VolumesSpecial Issue: Translating 18th and 19th Century European Travel WritingSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiSpecial Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratestiNewsNewsNewsSpecial Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IVSpecial Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IVSpecial Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IVSpecial Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IVSpecial Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IVSpecial Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IVSpecial Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IVSpecial Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IVSpecial Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IVSpecial Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IVSpecial Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IVNewsNewsCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyCommemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna SkyNewsNewsNewsNewsNewsNewsNewsSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingNewsNewsNewsNewsSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingSpecial Issue: New Insights into Translator TrainingNewsTranslationsNewsVolumesNewsNewsVolumesNewsNewsTranslationsVolumesNewsNewsSpecial Issue: Le ragioni del tradurreNewsReviewsVolumesVolumesSpecial Issue: Transit and Translation in Early Modern EuropeSpecial Issue: Transit and Translation in Early Modern EuropeSpecial Issue: Transit and Translation in Early Modern EuropeSpecial Issue: Transit and Translation in Early Modern EuropeNewsNewsSpecial Issue: Transit and Translation in Early Modern EuropeSpecial Issue: Le ragioni del tradurreSpecial Issue: Transit and Translation in Early Modern Europe

User profiling in audio description reception studies: questionnaires for all

By Irene Tor-Carroggio & Pilar Orero (Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain)

Abstract & Keywords

Defining disability is not an easy task due to its multidimensionality. This paper begins with a revision of some of the most common models to define disability. The second part of the article examines end user profiling in articles, European funded projects and PhD thesis’ related to one of the media accessibility modalities: audio description. The objective is to understand the approach taken by researchers. The final part of the article will propose a new approach in the study of end users in experimental research in Translation Studies, Audiovisual Translation, and Media Accessibility. This new approach gives a response to the International Telecommunication Union’s suggestion of leaving the biomedical approaches behind. Our suggestion is based on Amartya Sen’s capabilities approach, which has not yet been applied to user profiling in media accessibility studies. The article finishes by illustrating how this approach can be applied when profiling users in media accessibility questionnaires.

Keywords: media accessibility, capabilities, models of disability, audio description

©inTRAlinea & Irene Tor-Carroggio & Pilar Orero (2019).
"User profiling in audio description reception studies: questionnaires for all"
inTRAlinea Volumes
Edited by: {specials_editors_volumes}
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2410

1. Introduction

Defining disability is a daunting task given its connotations when applied to human conditions: physical, cognitive and social. Disability holds a human element in regards to a medical condition, associated with social and financial backgrounds that cannot be measured or simplified by one single definition or theoretical model (Albrecht et al. 2001). Theoretical models are useful and necessary, although it is important not to overlook the fact that they are simplistic and imperfect (Albrecht et al. 2001). Yet, models and definitions facilitate the task of researchers, as they offer a theoretical background and a methodology to work with. There are several models disability can be framed by, the medical one being among the earliest. Nonetheless, since studies into Disability began in 1994 at Syracuse University, there has been a radical, academic departure from it. This change of mindset has facilitated the emergence of other models that see disability as the result of a plethora of factors that have little or nothing to do with the person’s impairment.

This paper is divided into five sections. First, it will present some of the most popular models of disability. Second, it will look at research performed using these models. Third, it will describe a new approach from which to investigate disability within Media Accessibility (MA) studies. Fourth, some examples on how to apply this new model will be provided. Finally, some conclusions are drawn.

1.1. Models of disability

Fisher and Goodley (2007) explain the medical approach to disability:

A growing preoccupation with ‘normality’ meant that illness and disability became separated from everyday life and were constructed as forms of individual pathology. In this process the medical profession came to exert almost complete jurisdiction over the definitions of normality and abnormality (Fisher and Goodley 2007: 66).

The Medical Model is still dominating research in general. This is reinforced by our following of its linguistic composition, with the prefix “dis” changing the meaning of the word “ability”. In line with this, the lack or limitation on the capability of a person is classified by their condition. The Medical Model focuses on a biological reality being the cause of the impairment and it sees impairments as a personal condition that needs to be prevented, rehabilitated, or taken care of (Marks 1997). Despite its popularity, this model has been criticized on different grounds by activists and academics, for its failure “to acknowledge the defects in the environment” (Marks 1997: 87).

In contrast, the Social Model shifts the focus from health to society. It was mainly developed by Michael Oliver, who “sees disability, by contrast with impairment, as something imposed on disabled people by oppressive and discriminating social and institutional structures” (Terzi 2005: 201). This model has at least nine different versions (Mitra 2006) and deals with human diversity (Edler 2009). Disability is not the result of having a physical impairment, but the failure of society to consider individual differences (Bøttcher and Dammeyer 2016). Therefore, disability is not an attribute of the individual, but an environmental, social creation (Mitra 2006). However this model is not exempt from drawbacks. On one hand, and according to Shakespeare, “the simplicity which is the hallmark of the social model is also its fatal flaw” (Shakespeare 2010: 271). This author claims that the denial of impairment is an important factor in many disabled people’s lives and that the unrealistic concept of a barrier-free utopia, in which all barriers are removed are among the weaknesses of this model. On the other hand, Terzi (2005) considers there to be an aspect of over-socialization of sources and causes of disability, as well as the model overlooking the complex dimensions of impairment.

Even though these two models are paradigmatic, there are others worth mentioning. The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) was initially drafted as a human rights convention that aimed to substitute the Medical Model for the Social Model. Yet, according to Degeners (2016), the drafters went beyond the Social Model and wrote a treaty based on a new approach: the Human Rights Model of Disability, to be implemented by the CRPD. It encircles many human rights: political, civil, economic, social and cultural. It goes beyond the anti-discrimination rights of disabled persons (Degeners 2016). Regarding its weaknesses, Berghs et al. (2016) underline that lack of enforcement has been issue and in turn, the lack of defined penalties. This is true for some world regions, but is not the case for the US, Australia or Europe, where laws have been enforced through heavy penalties applied by the CRPD. The Netflix caption lawsuit is a good example. In June 2011, the National Association of the Deaf (NAD) filed suit against Netflix for their lack of closed captioning for video streaming as a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The judge ruled in favor of the NAD and Netflix was ordered to provide captions in its video streaming library in 2014, and to continue captioning content published from that moment on, along with having to pay a hefty sum for legal fees and damages.

The Nagi Model (Nagi 1991) has a dynamic approach based on the differences between four different but interrelated concepts: active pathology, impairment, functional limitation, and disability. Disability is an “inability or limitation in performing socially defined roles and tasks expected of an individual within a sociocultural and physical environment” (Nagi 1991: 315). These roles and tasks are organized into spheres of life activities, such as work, education, family, etc. For instance, think of a 10-year-old girl with a severe hearing impairment who does not attend school but stays at the farm where she lives with her parents helping with farming chores. If she lives in a society where young girls are not expected to go to school, then she cannot be labelled as “disabled” under this model. Conversely, she will be labelled ‘disabled’ if she lives in a place where girls her age go to school, as she is therefore not performing her socially expected role.

The Biopsychosocial Model is a response to the over-medicalisation of the International Classification of Impairments, Disabilities and Handicaps (ICIDH). The UN World Health Organisation in 2001 published the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). The ICF was intended to complement its sister classification system, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) (Brown and Lent 2008). The ICF Model sees disability as the result of a combination of individual, institutional and societal factors that define the environment of a person with an impairment (Dubois and Trani 2009). It is set in motion by the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule II (WHODAS II), and covers all types of disabilities in various countries, languages and contexts, which makes it suitable for cross-cultural use. Dubois and Trani (2009) consider the ICF to be limited in its scope and use, since its primary purpose is classification. They believe the complexity of disability requires a wider and more comprehensive analytical view. Ellis (2016) also raised this issue, highlighting the difference between disability and impairment.

In 2017, the UN agency International Telecommunication Union (ITU) released a report addressing access to telecommunication/ICT services by persons with disabilities and with specific needs that stated the following:

Besides the more commonly used “medical model of disability”, which considers disability “a physical, mental, or psychological condition that limits a person’s activities”, there is a more recent “social model of disability,” which has emerged and is considered a more effective or empowering conceptual framework for promoting the full inclusion of persons with disabilities in society. Within this social model, a disability results when a person (a) has difficulties reading and writing; (b) attempts to communicate, yet does not understand or speak the national or local language, and (c) has never before operated a phone or computer attempts to use one – with no success. In all cases, disability has occurred, because the person was not able to interact with his or her environment. (ITU 2017: 2)

Contextualised within the realm of research in MA; this implies that simply knowing whether or not the person has a hearing or a visual impairment is of little to no use. The ITU is calling for a new approach that analyses different aspects of each individual that might have an influence on what researchers are testing. This has already been found relevant in previous studies (Romero-Fresco 2015). Romero-Fresco (2015) pointed out that reading subtitles was related to a person’s educational background rather than to their hearing impairment. This is the point from which we depart. How to approach the question of demography among persons with disabilities when the objective of the study is not to restore their sensory impairment.

2. Approaches followed by previous researchers on audio description (AD)

User profiling is often carried out through questionnaires which gather demographic information. How to formulate questions is very often related to the model of disability adopted (Berghs et al. 2016). The following 14 publications, which focus on user-centred research in AD, have been analysed: Fernández-Torné and Matamala 2015; Szarkowska 2011; Szarkowska and Jankowska 2012; Walczak 2010; Romero-Fresco and Fryer 2013; Fresno et al. 2014; Fryer and Freeman 2012; Fryer and Freeman 2014; Szarkowska and Wasylczyk 2014; Udo and Fels 2009; Walczak and Fryer 2017; Walczak and Fryer 2018; Walczak and Rubaj 2014; Chmiel and Mazur 2012a. Three experimental PhD dissertations were also included in the analysis (Fryer 2013; Cabeza-Cáceres 2013; and Walczak 2017 (framed within the EU-funded project HBB4ALL), as well as other research results from major/extensive/wide-scale projects such as DTV4ALL,[1] ADLAB,[2] the Pear Tree Project (Chmiel and Mazur 2012b), OpenArt (Szarkowska et al. 2016), and AD-Verba (Chmiel and Mazur 2012).

The studies in question show different approaches to the profiling of users with disabilities as part of the demographic questionnaire prior to any test. There are two questions common to all: gender and age. When asking about gender, there is always a choice between “male”/”female” but the option of not answering the question or selecting another option is never offered. In relation to age, it is often asked by offering intervals; although in some cases it can also be an open question where a figure has to be entered.

Most questionnaires also query level of education. This is presented in various forms: items can be very detailed (Fernández-Torné and Matamala 2015), with a choice of three options (primary education, secondary education, and higher education) (Szarkowska 2011) or contain a moderately detailed list (primary, vocational, secondary, college/university student, university degree) (ADLAB project).

As for the occupation of the participants, it is not generally asked for but with the exception of one study (Fernández-Torné and Matamala 2015).

With regards to the language participants generally use, the majority of questionnaires do not refer to it. The exceptions are the questionnaires in DTV4ALL and the Pear Tree project.

Technology and AD exposure of participants were asked in most questionnaires. The objective of such questions was to corroborate whether the participants were familiar with a given technology and service, how well they knew it, and how frequently they used it. Information about participant habits regarding consumption of audiovisual content was also a point in common for all questionnaires, by means of closed or multiple-choice questions.

Regarding how disability is profiled, researchers take two approaches: self-reporting (Szarkowska ahd Jankowska 2012, Walczak and Fryer 2017) or responding to a question regarding physical condition (Fernández-Torné and Matamala 2015; Fresno and Soler-Vilageliu 2014). How the condition is classified also has three different approaches:

  1. Using WHO binary classification: blind and low sighted (Fernández-Torné and Matamala 2015; Fresno and Soler-Vilageliu 2014, Szarkowska and Jankowska 2012).
  2. Adopting RNIB classification (Szarkowska 2011, TV3 in the DTV4ALL project, and the AD-Verba Project):[3] “Which of these best describes your sight with glasses or contact lenses if you normally use them but without any low vision aid? Imagine you are in a room with good lighting and answer yes, no or uncertain to each part, please. Can you see well enough to: Tell by the light where the windows are?/ See the shapes of the furniture in the room?/ Recognise a friend across a road?/ Recognise a friend across a room?/ Recognise a friend if he or she is at arm’s length?/ Recognize a friend if you get close to his or her face?/ Read a newspaper headline?/ Read a large print book?/ Read ordinary newspaper print? (Possible answers: ‘yes’, ‘no’, ‘uncertain’)”.
  3. Beyond WHO and RNIB, Walczak and Fryer (2017) included:
    • self-reported sight loss (mild, considerable, complete) and visual acuity specification;
    • age when registered as visually impaired;
    • and the medical name of the visual condition.

Also, all researchers requested information regarding the origin of the condition. In most cases the question of whether the sight loss is congenital or acquired was included, sometimes by giving two options (congenital/acquired), and other times (less often) by giving more options, such as intervals (e.g. from birth/for between 1 and 10 years, etc.).

After analysing the most recent experimental research with end users in the field of AD, it can be said that all demographic questions follow the medical approach when profiling. Although other sociological oriented questions are also present, still the ultimate matching of disability and technology proficiency is performed by an inductive inference by the researcher.

3. The Capabilities Approach

Amartya Sen, Nobel laureate economist, developed the Capability Approach, which has been used as a framework to analyse different concepts in welfare economics (Mitra 2006). It was later complemented by philosopher Martha Nussbaum (Terzi 2005). This approach can be useful in other disciplines, such as Disability Studies (Mitra 2006). The Capabilities Approach revolves around two main concepts:

  1. “capabilities”, which are seen as a person’s “practical opportunities”, such as having the chance to eat something if you feel hungry, and
  2. “functionings”, viewed as “actual achievements”, such as actually eating. In Sen’s words:
Functionings represent parts of the state of a person–in particular the various things that he or she manages to do or be in leading a life. The capability of a person reflects the alternative combinations of functionings the person can achieve, and from which he or she can choose one collection. (Sen 1993: 31)

Sen (1993) claims the interaction between these concepts can have an impact on peoples lives. This author illustrates his point through an example, contrasting the two terms: two women have the same functioning (not being well nourished) but very different capabilities. One has the capability, this is, the opportunity to be well nourished but decides to starve for her religious beliefs, whereas the other cannot afford to buy any food. It can, therefore, be seen that a person’s capabilities and functionings are influenced by external factors (in that particular example, religious beliefs), which can be grouped into three categories: commodities, personal characteristics and structural factors (see figure 1 for a simplified version of how the Capabilities Approach works).

Figure 1. A simplified version of Sen’s Capabilities Approach (Mitra 2006: 240)

Sen (1993) emphasized the plurality of purposes for which the capability approach can have relevance. Mitra (2006) suggests applying the Capabilities Approach to Disability Studies to define “disability” on a conceptual level:

Under Sen’s approach, capability does not constitute the presence of a physical or a mental ability; rather, it is understood as a practical opportunity. Functioning is the actual achievement of the individual, what he or she actually achieves through being or doing. Here, disability can be understood as a deprivation in terms of capabilities or functionings that results from the interaction of an individual’s (a) personal characteristics (e.g., age, impairment) and (b) basket of available goods (assets, income) and (c) environment (social, economic, political, cultural). (Mitra 2009: 236-237)

Mitra (2006) understands that disability may occur when there is a health impairment, but also other factors that result in a deprivation of capabilities or functionings. If a person is deprived of practical opportunities because of an impairment, Mitra believes we are talking about what she calls “potential disability”, whereas if the person’s functionings are restricted by the impairment we are talking about “actual disability”. The difference between these two types of disability can be seen through an example. If an 18-year-old visually impaired person wants to attend college but lacks the opportunity, they can be seen as a “potential” disabled person in comparison with someone who has a similar background. In this case it can be seen that health impairment reduces a person’s practical opportunities, and this can lead to disability. A person is actually disabled if they cannot do something they value doing or being, which, in this example, would be going to college.

The Capability Approach contributes to a new and useful insight on disability by differentiating between the two levels of the problem: the capability level and the functioning level. It proves to be a different approach because, for instance, unlike the Social and Medical Models, it provides a comprehensive account of the variety of factors that might lead to deprivation. In contrast to the Medical Model, the impairment is not always the cause of disability, and, unlike the Social Model, the environment is not always the reason for disability (Mitra 2006). The ICF, although initially thought of as an integration of the strengths of the two main models, it fails to achieve its objective and could benefit from becoming open-ended. It should also recognise that not all dimensions of life may be specified and classified, and thus the classification does not, and cannot be expected to offer an exhaustive account of the lived experience of health deprivations (Mitra 2018). It can therefore be concluded that this new disability approach conforms to what the ITU has recently required and can be applied to studies dealing with disability, such as those working on MA.

4. Applying the Capabilities Approach

The Capability Approach developed by Sen is a useful framework for defining disability and understanding its consequences (Mitra 2006). Its usefulness in defining disability and formulating disability policies was considered by Mitra (2006) but to date no applications regarding the methodological approach have been followed in MA studies. This is what this section will deal with.

The way to implement this model in any discipline is by drafting a list of capabilities and functionings that are relevant to the object of study:

The full range of the disability experience can then be covered, by shifting the focus away from the restricted view of identifying types of impairment. The fact that each individual is asked about the level of difficulty he/she experiences in functioning in the various dimensions of well-being makes it easier to assess the level of disability in a comprehensive manner. [...]However, specific information is required to assess and measure disability within this paradigm. Data are related to individuals’ potentialities, the possibilities that they can “be” what they wish to be, their aspirations and what they value. It also entails gathering information about vulnerability, which expresses the risk of suffering a reduction of the capability set, measured by the probability of falling to a lower state of well-being. Finally, it requires information about the opportunities offered by the environment. (Dubois and Trani 2009: 198).

Sen’s theoretical Capability Approach proposal is open. It does not offer an application model since it does not make a complete list of capabilities functionings, personal characteristics, commodities and environmental factors (Mitra 2006). Sen does not propose a prescriptive method to rank capability sets (Mitra 2006; Terzi 2005). This voluntary incompleteness makes the capability approach difficult to implement operationally, but in turn allows for adaptation to every scenario. For example, in the field of Media Accessibility, it should be adapted to the tested technology. The capabilities and functionings may vary according to relevant personal factors, resources, and structural factors. It will also vary depending on the object of study. Therefore, the demographics of the study should be adapted to the study characteristics.

In the field of MA, researchers could implement the following steps:

  1. Think of an access service that could prevent one or more groups of persons from being potentially or actually disabled whilst accessing audiovisual content. Measuring disability is perhaps an impossible task, but for research purposes, where the focus is not on how to restore medical conditions, selecting relevant capabilities or functionings to form an “evaluative space” is needed (Mitra 2006). What needs to be done is drafting a set of functionings (or capabilities) that our access service can provide.
  2. Carefully analyse the group or groups of persons that could benefit the most from this service. This should be achieved by not only taking into account their sensorial impairments, but also the personal, structural and environmental factors. For example, a person with sight loss may not be able to access a TV series because the menu EPG (Electronic Programme Guide) is not accessible and they cannot activate the AD function. The same situation can occur for someone with reduced motor skills such as dexterity, or a person with learning disabilities who finds it challenging to interact with the TV remote control. The final result is that neither the person with sight loss, learning disability nor dexterity can enjoy a TV programme.
  3. Carry out, for example, some focus groups in which all the target groups are represented to confirm which particular service could amplify their capability set and, therefore, avoid disability from occurring or from being a possibility. These occasions should also be used to elicit more information regarding what features the service requires in order to offer a better and more enhanced experience. Listing relevant functionings and capabilities should be a user-centered activity. However, members of groups may be so deprived in specific dimensions that they lack self-critical distance. A good example is the addition of subtitles in some opera theatres (Oncins 2015). While sighted people enjoy subtitles, people with sight loss may have an audio description but not audio subtitles. Blind and partially sighted audience members may not be aware of the existence of subtitles and subsequently do not request the service.
  4. Develop the service according to what the target groups have requested.
  5. Test the service to ensure that what has been developed complies with what users require so that they are no longer disabled in that particular field or occasion. Obviously, the users taking part in the tests should come from all the various target groups that were considered initially.

It is precisely in this last stage that questionnaires should reflect the variety of users taking part in the tests and, therefore, the need to mainstream accessibility. This can only be done by expanding the section that contains the demographic questions. Were this to be done, the plethora of factors leading to disability could be better observed. As we have seen, MA research tends to include questions regarding physical impairments but does not always consider other factors that could cause or are already causing a person to be disabled. This is precisely what needs to be solved but, again, we cannot provide a one-fits-all solution because the questions depend on the object of study, i.e., on the particularities of the technology or service tested.

Questions asked in focus groups or questionnaires should not mix health issues with impairments, functionings and capabilities because they would reduce the empirical relations between the different concepts of the Capabilities Approach. The question “are you limited to the number of movies you can watch due to a visual impairment?” would be an example of the type of question that should be avoided. Also, in MA studies, there is no reason beyond statistic to ask for gender-related information, unless a capability falls under a cultural or religious category. Regarding age, most studies request age as with gender, in order to have a statistically comparable representative group. In some cases, requesting age was associated to the origin of the condition, for the researcher to assume some impact on the object of study. According to Sen’s model, requesting age will have a direct implication on questions such as: “do you consume AD?”.

The EU-funded EasyTV project (https://easytvproject.eu/) aims at easing the access of audiovisual content and the media to the functionally diverse and to the growing ageing population of Europe. This will be achieved by developing new access services, such as customised subtitles, subtitles for colour-blind users and a crowdsourcing platform with which videos in sign language can be uploaded and shared. These access services are expected to grant an equal and better access to audio-visual content in terms of both choice and quality. The project was started off by discussing with users precisely what capabilities they would like to have when consuming audiovisual content. For the initial focus groups, “super end users” were recruited. Not all of them suffered from a physical impairment. In addition to being regular users, they had some knowledge on the technologies that would be tested. This knowledge was deemed crucial since they were requested to advance their expectations to match the innovation. It would have made no sense to consult end users with no prior knowledge or experience of functional diversity or technological background because at that stage what we required was not their acceptance of the final service, but issues related to technology development. This allowed us to apply Sen’s theory to a concrete case. During the focus groups carried out at that stage, the following list of questions were drafted:

  1. How is your current experience using TV?
    “It is not easy to access the TV”.
    “It is very difficult to use the remote control”.
  1. Which modalities do you use to interact with the TV?
    “Using the remote control is very difficult without audio feedback”.

The response to the difficulty to access TV elicited possible technologies and the following opinions.

  1. For image magnification two important issues emerged:
    - “It would be useful to magnify a specific portion of the screen (for example objects that need to be recognized) or overlaying text that is not clear, so I can read it better”.
    - “It is important to stop playing the image to let me magnify the screen or a portion of it”.
  1. For audio narratives the following features are considered crucial for blind and low vision persons:
    -“It is useful to have this service available both automatically (without user interaction) and manually (using the remote control or speech commands) to manage the volume of available audio tracks”.
    - “For example, when listening to opera I am only interested in the music, so I should be able to lower the volume of the audio description”.
    - “During live programs, it is very useful to know what is happening and what the TV is showing during silent time. When I am with my family they tell me what is going on, but when alone, nothing can be done”.
  1. Regarding the speech interface to control TV functionalities, blind people consider voice control and audio feedback to be very important when using the remote control. It is also very important to export content (audio and video) into a mobile device.

The above are all practical opportunities (capabilities) that end users would like to have and should be taken into account by developers. The beneficiary of these solutions is not isolated to the collective of persons with disabilities, since these solutions will be of great help also to the ageing population, people with reading issues, and by default to all. This universal approach has already been accepted with subtitles, which are no longer for the deaf and hard of hearing community, but also for the 80 per cent of people who watch media content in public spaces with the volume turned off.[4]

Testing in Easy TV has profiled the user requirements of people with sensorial disabilities: deaf and hard of hearing and visually impaired. Yet, results from tests do not correspond to sensorial disabilities. An example is the use of Smart TV functionalities and access to set up controls. Expectations and needs defined by user interaction with Smart TV are in fact related to age or behaviour, rather than disability. This real example extracted from test results in the EasyTV project show the need to adopt the Capability Approach. If it were to be implemented, in future stages, for each capability detected, a list of demographic factors surrounding it should be drafted. Another good example suggested while testing object-based audio (OBA) was to develop audio description on 360º video. It was found that OBA will benefit audio description since layers of information are added regarding sound directionality (Orero, Ray and Hughes forthcoming). Since OBA can be mixed by the audience, it turned out that people with hearing loss enjoyed OBA as mixing the dialogue track with the sound track allowed for a better dialogue intelligibility, producing a clean audio effect. This goes to show that a technology developed for one group was also beneficial for another group, something that would have never been tested if users were selected on the basis of their disability. 

5. Conclusions

MA research has been using the medical model to profile end users for their experimental research. This is probably due to research being framed within the UN CRPD, where accessibility is considered a tool towards achieving a human right (Greco 2016). The UN convention CRPD motto “nothing about us without us” has also conditioned participants for accessibility tests. After a decade following this research approach, results point towards the need to consider a wider audience for testing. Ellis (2016) has already clarified the difference between impairment and disability. Research data gathered from visually impaired persons apply to society in general. By applying the Capability Approach, research will not consider disability/health conditions as individual attributes. Focusing on impairments resources, structural and personal factors should yield data closer to the research objective than to a medical solution of health restoration. Failure to use an interactional model may generate an unnecessary focus on prevention/rehabilitation through the Medical Model or social oppression through the Social Model (Mitra 2018). The Capability Approach can be used by MA researchers and technology developers, since they need to find out what capabilities and functionings users would like to have. They also need to verify whether the technology they develop provides opportunities the target groups that are currently missing. This approach is also interesting for them as they can start recruiting users with a more varied profile and not just people with physical impairments. MA academic researchers are also within the stakeholders, since they are often the ones in charge of testing access services within projects or PhD thesis’ and need to be aware of the fact that sometimes the results yielded are due to the informants’ personal or environmental factors rather than them being partially sighted.

The Capability Approach will also work towards solving a negative feature in most existing research: the low number of participants. Profiling beyond medical prognosis opens participation to a wider audience and a higher potential participation. This Capability Model will also do away with the user representativeness required for statistical validity. For example, the number of blind people in a country will no longer have to be taken into consideration to determine the number of users needed in the tests. Mainstreaming accessibility will have an impact not only in research but also in its application to industrial sectors working within investment frameworks. MA services are valid to society and especially to persons with disabilities. This reduced sector should be the gatekeeper for quality, since in some cases access marks the threshold to deprivation.

Acknowledgements

This paper was funded by the EasyTV project (GA761999), RAD (PGC2018-096566-B-100), and ImAc (GA 761974). Both researchers are members of the research group TransMedia Catalonia (2017SGR113).

References

Albrecht, Gary, Katherine Seelman, and Michael Bury (2001) Handbook of Disability Studies, California, Sage Publications: 97-119.

Berghs, Maria Jeanne, Karl Michael Atkins, and Hillary Graham (2016) “Scoping models and theories of disability. Implications for public health research of models and theories of disabilities: a scoping study and evidence synthesis”, Public Health Research, 4(8): 23-40.

Bøttcher, Louise, and Jesper Dammeyer (2016) “Beyond a biomedical and social model of disability: a cultural-historical approach”, Development and learning of young children with disabilities. International perspectives on early childhood education and development, 13, Cham, Springer: 3-23.

Brown, Steven, and Robert Lent (eds.) (2008) Handbook of Counseling Psychology, New Jersey, Wiley: 217.

Cabeza-Cáceres, Cristóbal (2013) Audiodescripció i recepció. Efecte de la velocitat de narració, l’entonació i l’explicitació en la comprensió fílmica, PhD diss., Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain.

Chmiel, Agnieszka, and Iwona Mazur (2012a) “Audio description research: some methodological considerations”, in Emerging topics in translation: audio description, Elisa Perego (ed.), Trieste, EUT: 57-80.

Chmiel, Agnieszka, and Iwona Mazur (2012b) “Audio Description Made to Measure: Reflections on Interpretation in AD based on the Pear Tree Project Data”, in Audiovisual translation and media accessibility at the crossroads. Media for all 3, M. Carroll, Aline Remael, and Pilar Orero (eds.), Amsterdam/New York, Rodolpi: 173-88.

Degeners, Theresia (2016) “Disability in a Human Rights Context”, Laws, 5(3): 5-35.

Dubois, Jean-Luc, and Jean-François Trani (2009) “Extending the capability paradigm to address the complexity of disability”, ALTER, European Journal of Disability Research, 3: 192–218.

Edler, Rosita (2009) “La clasificación de la funcionalidad y su influencia en el imaginario social sobre las discapacidades”, in Visiones y revisiones de la discapacidad, P.Brogna (ed.), México D.F., Fondo de Cultura Económica: 137-54.

Ellis, Gerry (2016) "Impairment and Disability: Challenging Concepts of “Normality”, in Researching Audio Description, Anna Matamala and Pilar Orero (eds.), London, Palgrave Macmillan: 35-45.

Fernández-Torné, Anna, and Anna Matamala (2015) “Text-to-speech versus human voiced audio description: a reception study in films dubbed into Catalan”, The Journal of Specialised Translation, 24: 61-88.

Fisher, Pamela, and Dan Goodley (2007) “The linear medical model of disability: mothers of disabled babies resist with counter-narratives”, Sociology of Health & Illness, 29 (1): 66–81.

Fresno, Nazaret, Judit Castellà, and Olga Soler-Vilageliu (2014) “Less is more. Effects of the amount of information and its presentation in the recall and reception of audio described characters”, International Journal of Sciences: Basic and Applied Research, 14(2): 169-96.

Fryer, Louise (2013) Putting it into words: the impact of visual impairment on perception, experience and presence, PhD diss., University of London, UK.

Fryer, Louise, and Jonathan Freeman (2012) “Cinematic language and the description of film: keeping AD users in the frame”, Perspectives. Studies in Translatology, 21(3): 412-26.

Fryer, Louise, and Jonathan Freeman (2014) “Can you feel what I’m saying? The impact of verbal information on emotion elicitation and presence in people with a visual impairment”, in Challenging presence: Proceedings of the 15th international conference on presence, edited by A. Felnhofer and O.D. Kothgassner, 9-107. Wien: facultas.wuv.

Greco, Gian Maria. 2016. “On Accessibility as a Human Right, with an Application to Media Accessibility”, in Researching Audio Description, Anna Matamala and Pilar Orero (eds.), London, Palgrave Macmillan: 11-33.

Hughes, Bill, and Kevin Paterson (2006) “The social model of disability and the disappearing body: Towards a sociology of impairment”, in Overcoming Disability Barriers, London, Taylor and Francis: 325-40.  

International Telecommunication Union (2017) Question 7/1: Access to telecommunication/ICT services by persons with disabilities and with specific needs, https://www.itu.int/dms_pub/itu-d/opb/stg/D-STG-SG01.07.4-2017-PDF-E.pdf

Marks, Deborah (1997) “Models of Disability”, Disability and Rehabilitation, 19(3): 85-91.

Mitra, Sophie (2006) “The Capability Approach and Disability”, Journal of Disability Policy Studies, 16(4): 236-47.

Mitra, Sophie (2018) Disability, Health and Human Development, New York, Palgrave: 10-45.

Nagi, Saad (1991) “Disability Concepts Revisited: Implications for Prevention”, in Disability in America: Toward a National Agenda for Prevention, AM. Pope, and R. Alvin (eds.), Washington, DC, National Academy Press: 309–27.

Oncins, Estella (2015) The tyranny of the tool: subtitling live performances, Perspectives, 23(1):42-61.

Orero, Pilar, Sonaly Rai and Chris Hughes (2019) "The challenges of audio description in new formats", in Innovation in Audio Description Research, Sabine Braun (ed.), London: Routledge.

Orero, Pilar, and Anna Matamala (2016) "User-centric Audio Description: A Topsy-turvy Research Approach", in Scrittura brevi: segni, testi e contesti. Dalle iscrizione antiche ai tweet, Alberto Manco, and Azzurra Mancini (eds.), Naples, Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale": 376-87.

Orero, Pilar, Stephen Doherty, Jan-Louis Kruger, Anna Matamala, Jan Pedersen, Elisa Perego, Pablo Romero-Fresco, Sara Rovira-Esteva, Olga Soler-Vilageliu, and Agnieszka Szarkowska (forthcoming). “Conducting experimental research in audiovisual translation (AVT): A position paper”, Jostrans, 30.

Romero-Fresco, Pablo, and Louise Fryer (2013) “Could audio described films benefit from audio introductions? A reception study with audio description users”, Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness, 107(4): 287-95.

Romero-Fresco, Pablo (2015) The Reception of Subtitles for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing in Europe, Bern, Peter Lang: 350-53.

Sen, Amartya (1991) “Capability and well-doing”, in The Quality of life, Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum (eds.), New York, Oxford: 30-53.

Shakespeare, Tom (2010) “The Social Model of Disability”, in The Disability Studies Reader, J. Lennar (ed.), New York, Routledge: 266-73.

Szarkowska, Agnieszka (2011) “Text-to-speech audio description: towards wider availability of audio description”, The Journal of Specialised Translation, 15: 142-63.

Szarkowska, Agnieszka, and Anna Jankowska (2012) “Text-to-speech audio description of voice-over films. A case study of audio described Volver in Polish”, in Emerging topics in translation: audio description, Elisa Perego (ed.), Trieste, EUT: 81-98.

Szarkowska, Agnieszka, and Piotr Wasylczyk (2014) “Audiodeskrypcja autorska”, Przekladaniec, 28: 48-62.

Szarkowska, Agnieszka, Anna Jankowska, Krzysztof Krejtz, and Jarosław Kowalski (2016) “OpenArt: Designing Accessible Content in a Multimedia Guide App for visitors with and without sensory impairments”, Researching Audio Description: New Approaches, Anna Matamala and Pilar Orero (ed.), London, Palgrave: 301-20.

Terzi, Lorella (2005) “A capability perspective on impairment, disability and special needs: Towards social justice in education”, Theory and Research in Education, 3(2): 197–223.

Udo, John-Patrick, and Deborah Fels (2009) “Suit the action to the word, the word to the action. An unconventional approach to describing Shakespeare’s Hamlet”, Journal of Visual Impairment and Blindness, 103(3): 178-83.

Walczak, Agnieszka (2013) Immersion in audio description. The impact of style and vocal delivery on users’ experience, PhD diss, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain.

Walczak, Agnieszka, and Louise Fryer (2017) “Creative description. The impact of audio description style on presence in visually impaired audiences”, British Journal of Visual Impairment: 6-17.

Walczak, Agnieszka, and Louise Fryer (2018) “Vocal delivery of audio description by genre”, Perspectives. Studies in Translatology, 26(1): 69-83.

Walczak, Agnieszka, and Maria Rubaj (2014) “Audiodeskrypcja na lekcji historii, biologii i fizki w klasie uczniów z dysfunkcja wzroku”, Przekladaniec, 28: 63-79.

About the author(s)

Irene Tor-Carroggio is a Ph.D student in Translation and Intercultural Studies at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) and is also a member of the research group TransMedia Catalonia (2017SGR113). She holds a B.A. in Translation and Interpretation from the UAB (2013) and also an M.A. in International Business from Shanghai University of Finance and Economics (2017). She is part of the EU-funded project EasyTV, http://easytvproject.eu.

Dr. Pilar Orero, (http://gent.uab.cat/pilarorero), PhD (UMIST, UK), teaches at Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spain). Member of TransMedia Catalonia research group (2017SGR113). Recent publications: Anna Maszerowska, Anna Matamala and Pilar Orero (eds) (2014) Audio Description. New perspectives illustrated. Amsterdam. John Benjamins. Anna Matamala and Pilar Orero (eds) (2016) Researching Audio Description. London: Palgrave Macmillan. Leader of numerous research projects funded by the Spanish and Catalan Gov. Participates in the UN ITU agency IRG AVA http://www.itu.int/en/irg/ava/Pages/default.aspx Membe.r of the working group ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 35. Member of the Spanish UNE working group on accessibility. Led the EU project HBB4ALL http://pagines.uab.cat/hbb4all/ Leads. the EU projects ACT http://pagines.uab.cat/act/ and UMAQ (Understanding Quality Media Accessibility) http://pagines.uab.cat/umaq/ She i.s the UAB leader at the 2 new H2020 projects EasyTV (interaction to accessible TV) http://easytvproject.eu and ImAc (Immersive Accessibility) http://www.imac-project.eu 2017-2021. She is an active external evaluator for many worldwide national agencies: South Africa, Australia, Lithuania, Belgium, Poland, Italy, US, and UK. Co-founder of the Media Accessibility Platform MAP http://www.mapaccess.org

Email: [please login or register to view author's email address]

©inTRAlinea & Irene Tor-Carroggio & Pilar Orero (2019).
"User profiling in audio description reception studies: questionnaires for all"
inTRAlinea Volumes
Edited by: {specials_editors_volumes}
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2410

Translating Echoes

Challenges in the Translation of the Correspondence of a British Expatriate in Beresford’s Lisbon 1815-17

By António Lopes (University of the Algarve)

Abstract & Keywords

In 1812 the Farrer family established their wool trading business in Lisbon. Samuel Farrer and, a couple of years later, James Hutchinson remained in regular correspondence with Thomas Farrer, who owned a textile mill in the vicinity of Leeds, then centre of the wool trade in England. Their correspondence, spanning the period 1812-18, offers a vivid account of life in Lisbon and its hardships and troubles in the aftermath of the Peninsular War. Those letters mirror the turbulent politics of the time and articulate an attempt to narrate otherness and the way it kept challenging their gaze. The translation of the letters has posed some challenges, especially on a stylistic level. In order to confer a sense of historical authenticity on the target-language text and to attend to the stylistic features of the source-language text, the translator has been forced to revisit the Portuguese language of the period as it was spoken and written by the urban middle class in Lisbon. In this article I discuss some of the issues, both theoretical and practical, that have arisen in the course of the translation process.

Keywords: travel writing translation, commercial correspondence, private sphere, estrangement, displacement, double disjuncture, Peninsular Wars

©inTRAlinea & António Lopes (2013).
"Translating Echoes Challenges in the Translation of the Correspondence of a British Expatriate in Beresford’s Lisbon 1815-17"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: Translating 18th and 19th Century European Travel Writing
Edited by: Susan Pickford & Alison E. Martin
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/1967

1. Introduction

The world is a book, and those who do not travel read only a page.
Saint Augustine

During my research for the British Travellers in Portugal project – an ambitious initiative that has been carried out for almost three decades by the Anglo-Portuguese Studies group at the Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies (Lisbon and Oporto) –, I chanced upon a rather curious collection of letters housed at the National Archives in Kew.[1] Written by James Hutchinson Jr. (1796 - ?), a young Yorkshire merchant working in Lisbon, and addressed to his brother-in-law, Thomas Farrer, who headed the family’s wool business back in Farnley, Leeds, these letters span a period of approximately two and a half years (from 22 July, 1815 to 29 November, 1817), at a time when Portugal was struggling hard to stand on its feet after the scale of destruction caused by the Peninsular War.

Originally, the primary purpose of my undertaking was to contribute to an anthology of translated accounts of the city of Lisbon by British travellers. This meant that a considerable portion of the original text, most of it dwelling on private affairs or matters of commerce, would have to be excised in order to leave only those passages where explicit references were made to the Portuguese capital. However, it soon became evident that the scope of the content of these letters called for a differentiated approach and so the editor commissioned me to translate the complete set. The investment in an unabridged translation would give readers the opportunity not just to satisfy their curiosity about Lisbon, but above all to gain a sense of the complexity of the historical, social and economic issues with which the letters engaged, all the more so because translation is not about impoverishing the original, but about giving it a new lease of life: translation is not just a question of making a text accessible to another community of readers by acquiring a new linguistic and cultural dimension, but above all of allowing the letters to transcend their immediacy and the original purpose for which they were written, and inscribing them in new discursive practices.

So, instead of publishing excerpts of the letters in the anthology, both the editor and I decided to publish the complete set in two issues of the Revista de Estudos Anglo-Portugueses (CETAPS, Lisbon) (see Lopes 2010). This would allow us to preserve the integrity of the letters and, given the fact that the Revista is aimed at a scholarly readership (historians, philologists, cultural anthropologists, sociologists, and so on), to invest in a more detailed and in-depth approach, marked by philological accuracy and by a consciousness of the challenges posed by the hermeneutical inquiry. This would also give me the opportunity to set my own translation agenda, not just in terms of style and method, but also in terms of the future of this project. As a matter of fact, the files contain dozens of other letters and papers written by other members or friends of the family which, in view of their historical value, are also worth translating. I decided to amass all of them with the aim of publishing the whole collection in one single volume. That work is now underway.

Since translation is necessarily always a reflexive process (in more than one sense: on the one hand, the translator has to speculate about the meanings that the source text does not immediately disclose and about the readers’ responses to his/her choices; on the other, the target text always presents itself as a mirror image of the source text), the task of rendering this piece of nineteenth-century English prose into contemporary Portuguese prompted a series of theoretical and empirical questions which I set out to explore in the present article. The next section seeks to set the letters in their political, social and economic context. The meanings they contain are rooted in a specific historical setting, which has to be revisited so as to enable the text to function simultaneously as a piece of documentary evidence and as an instance of resistance: in the case of the former, substantiating that which historiography has already validated; in the case of the latter, defying or even rebutting historical theories. The third section (‘An Englishman in Lisbon’) touches on issues of estrangement, displacement and the quest for a sense of belonging, all of which are central to travel writing. The fourth section (‘Prying into a Gentleman’s Private Correspondence’) discusses the ethics and the challenges of translating the intimacy and confidentiality of private correspondence, and how the author’s objectivity gives the translator a foothold in the factual validation of his translation. The last full section (‘Translation as a Double Disjuncture’) focuses on issues of spatiality, temporality, representation and re-representation, as well as on some of the solutions to the problems posed by the historical dimension of the texts (modes of address; anachronisms; outdated terminology; formulaic language; and the need for historical research).

2. The Letters in Context: Portugal and her British Ally 1809-20

The Farrers were one among many of the local families whose lives revolved around the woollen and worsted manufacture and trade in Yorkshire. The success of their business went hand in hand with the economic growth and technological development of the period, a process which would leave an indelible mark on the landscape of the Midlands and the North of England. These developments led to major changes in the social structure, with a generalised phenomenon of rural-urban migration meeting the industry’s need for labour (Fletcher 1919: 77-84). The Yorkshire region soon became the chief export centre for manufactured woollen goods. In a world of cut-throat competition, those who succeeded in business were of an unrelenting entrepreneurial and ambitious spirit that often looked beyond the confines of Britain.

Industrial expansion forced traders to look further afield and open up new markets; Portugal swiftly became a key destination. Since Napoleon’s Continental Blockade, decreed in 1806, was firmly in place, the first industrial nation found itself in a worrying predicament. Portugal, where Britain’s commercial stakes ran high, was also left particularly exposed. It was only through Lisbon that it was possible to gain access to the Brazilian market, which had long become the mainstay of the intensive southern Atlantic economy, responsible for the capitalisation of the European market in the Early Modern period. Besides, the Portuguese could not afford to lose the support of the old ally, whose navy provided protection for the trade routes between the metropolis and its colonies. The French invasions of Portugal pushed it to the periphery of the very empire it had founded. If the demise of both commerce and industry had a terrible impact on the economy, the destruction the war wrought in the provinces proved no less damaging. Looting, extortion and massacres left a trail of blood, hatred and revulsion across the whole nation that was to remain unabated for generations. Wellington’s scorched earth policy – aiming to deprive the French troops of victuals and other supplies – aggravated the situation even further. Agriculture and husbandry practically ground to a halt and farmers were unable to produce the foodstuffs required to feed the urban centres. Famine set in and with it a period of demographic stagnation.

Freeing Portugal from the chains of Napoleonic imperialism was not without its costs. Unable to overcome such complete vulnerability, the nation was at the mercy of British interests. Certainly a significant part of the Portuguese economy had for a long time depended on Britain. Whether Portugal benefited from this trade relationship or not is a matter of controversy (Borges de Macedo 1963; Bethell 1984; Maxwell 2004; Pijning 1997; Pardo 1992). However, at least since the Methuen Treaty (1703) Britain had been undermining the Portuguese industry with a substantial influx of cheap manufactured goods undercutting all competition. In January 1808 the opening of the Brazilian ports to Britain represented a fatal blow. Two years later, the protective mechanism of customs duties was removed precisely when the Portuguese economy was most in need of it. The prospects for the manufacturing sector grew dimmer as British cotton and wool cloths flooded the Portuguese market.

The political power that William Carr Beresford, commander-in-chief of the Portuguese troops during the invasions, held during this crucial period in the country’s history played a decisive role in protracting this position of economic subordination. He ended up gaining considerable ascendancy over the representatives of the Prince Regent. In the post-war years he headed the military government, a position which rapidly eroded his earlier prestige as a war hero. People started protesting against the way public funds were being squandered to pay for the presence of British troops on national territory. Portuguese officers likewise harboured deep-seated resentment towards the British officers, who were now apparently being granted all sorts of privileges and promotions (see Glover 1976). Beresford’s radical intransigence in politics led to the repression of those who advocated a more liberal agenda, namely those who were suspected either of sympathising with the ideals of the French Jacobins, or of defending a constitutional monarchy. As a stern defender of Tory absolutism, his views were in line with the ones shared by two other Anglo-Irish potentates, namely Wellington and Castlereagh (Newitt 2004: 107). His absolutist values, along with his thirst for power, left him isolated in a world riven by deep-rooted hatreds. The revolutionary clamour heard in Oporto on 24 August 1820 was to put paid to Beresford’s ambitions. Paradoxically, partly thanks to the influence of the British officers, the British tradition of liberalism ended up taking root in a country lacking in ideological coordinates to define its political future.

When James Hutchinson first set foot in Lisbon, the country was going through a period of economic depression. His letters mirror the upheavals and the social unrest of the period and therefore help to shed light on historical processes, since they testify to the way in which individuals perceived reality and (re)acted accordingly. Popular reactions to the new king, news of the uprising in Pernambuco (Brazil), political persecutions, and hangings are well documented elsewhere,[2] but here we are given a view from the inside. Moreover, rather than just affirming the picture that the extensive historiographical literature on the subject has already established, the letters also disclose new facets. They prove that, despite the impressive growth of Britain’s exports in this period, British trade did not run smoothly in Portugal. Hutchinson could hardly be said to be the definitive model of the successful businessman. His efforts, nonetheless, were mostly undermined by factors that lay beyond his reach. General poverty, scarcity of money, shortages of food and other essentials, and rationing, for example, became recurrent, if not obsessive, subjects in his letters, betraying his sense of frustration and underachievement. Moreover, Hutchinson was forced to deal with fierce competition within the Portuguese market and the incompetence of the Customs officials, not to mention liabilities and bad debts, marketing obstacles and, curiously enough, an increasingly demanding clientele, all of which imposed psychological costs he found ever more difficult to cope with. And although he was not so forthcoming in discussing political issues, such as Beresford’s repression, his fears and silences about the persecutions are no less telling.

Each letter contains, as it were, the very essence of history and, through the picturesque and sometimes disconcerting episodes they feature, they help us recreate a reality long buried by time. Precisely because this is a genuine voice that has remained hidden amidst other archival material for almost two centuries, unscathed by later misappropriations or misinterpretations, we are able to salvage pristine fragments of the historical experience and to retrieve for our collective memory some of the particularities and singularities that are usually overlooked in the construction of the historical grand narratives of the nation. In a letter dated 18 October 1816, for instance, Hutchinson speaks of the funeral ceremonies of Queen Maria I and clearly enjoys recounting the peculiar causes of the accidental fire that burned down the church where those ceremonies were being held. In a later letter (22 October 1817), he provides a first-hand testimony of the horrendous hanging of the men who followed Gomes Freire de Andrade in his revolt against Lord Beresford’s roughshod rule. Elsewhere he laments the shortage of foodstuffs and the rise in prices which mercilessly strike the poor (letter dated 25 January 1817), but he cannot help relishing the story of a woman arrested for stealing bodies from the cemetery to produce black pudding to be sold to the local shops (9 August 1816). In another letter he speaks of an earthquake that threw the city ‘into the most dreadful alarm’ and the scenes of panic that ensued, while rejoicing at the fact that he remained ‘during the whole of the night in a sound slumber’ (3 February 1816).

3. An Englishman in Lisbon: Estrangement, Displacement and the Quest for Belonging

Notwithstanding the rapid decline of the Portuguese economy during and after the Peninsular War, British traders rapidly resumed their investments in the country. Samuel Farrer & Sons were amongst them. Samuel Farrer Jr. established the family’s business in Lisbon in 1812. The family’s entrepreneurial effort must have paid off somehow, for upon his death, in February 1815, they decided to keep on investing in their Portuguese venture. It would be up to young James Hutchinson Jr. to take up the business. His inexperience notwithstanding, James was not entirely at a loss. The need to account for every transaction and to keep his brother-in-law posted about how business was being conducted resulted in a correspondence of considerable length, which lasted until his departure from Lisbon at the end of 1817. The letters were permeated by the young man’s comments, remarks and anecdotes about life in the Portuguese capital. Being an outsider in customs, language and feelings, Hutchinson tried hard to accommodate himself to his new setting.

In his letters, however, the affectionate attachment he exhibits towards his sister and the other members of his family indicates that his stay in Lisbon was, emotionally speaking, hard to bear. He often complained about her silence and the fact that she now seemed to have forsaken him altogether. But then, it was not just the separation from his loved ones that threw him into a state of melancholy. His life in the Portuguese capital was infused with a sense of estrangement he was unable to overcome. He felt uprooted and disengaged.

It becomes all too apparent that his gaze is that of an outsider, of someone struggling to succeed in a strange, disturbing world, whose social and political environment contrasts in many respects with that of his native land. He soon realised it would not be easy to fit in. Despite the support that other British expatriates residing in Lisbon gave him, he complained to his family about living conditions there. Blatantly ironic, he confessed that he ‘suffer[ed] very much from the Muschetos [sic], Bugs & other filth with which this sweet City so much abounds’ (11 August 1815).

His difficulty in understanding the Portuguese is particularly visible when he is faced with the lack of patriotic fervour of the man in the street, a fervour one should expect from a nation that had been recently freed from the Napoleonic terror:

On Saturday last the King was proclaimed throughout the City and Sunday was appropriated for the acclamation.—The Troops were reviewed by Marshal Beresford, yet never did I witness their going through their manoevres [sic] in such an inanimate manner:—never was such a Viva given by the Portuguese to their Sovereign; scarcely did one Soul open his mouth, excepting the Marshal and his Staff Officers:—it was a complete ‘Buonapartean Viva’ a forced shout of applause dying away in a groan. (11 April 1817)

Since most of the time he was consumed by work, it becomes difficult for the contemporary reader to detect such feelings of estrangement in the midst of commercial jargon and ledger accounts. He sought to be meticulous in his book-keeping and reports and sensitive to changes in market conditions, especially as far as fashion, trends, tastes and purchasing power went. He struggled to prove himself worthy of the trust and respect not just of his brother-in-law, but also of other foreign merchants who had already established their names in the Portuguese market. He even got carried away by the idea of opening his own establishment in order to fend off competition and to tackle the problem of low bids, which often forced him to keep the bales in store for unusually long periods of time.

In order to perceive how displaced he felt, one has to read between the lines. When his enthusiasm waned or his health gave way, an undeclared anxiety and irritation would surface. His less than flattering comments on Portuguese customs officials and the tone of his replies to his brother-in-law whenever suspicion of laxness or mismanagement hung in the air prove the point. He became impatient when ships from Brazil, New York or Falmouth were unduly delayed. He was unnerved by the negligence of long-standing debtors, who often turned a deaf ear to his entreaties. Besides, in spite of the considerable sums of money that passed through his hands, James was far from leading an easy and comfortable life. In a sense, it was through his own body that he first measured the degree of his maladjustment. He was constantly ill, poorly dressed, and found his lodgings uncomfortable. The weather did not suit him and he feared death might creep up on him. For some time he had to resign himself to ‘a Bed Room fitted up for me in the Warehouse, without any other convenience or sitting room’ (11 April 1817). He would wear the same clothes for months on end, winter and summer alike. Disease would take hold of him and he would be confined to bed for several weeks. His neat copperplate handwriting would then degenerate to illegible scribbling. In the spring of 1817 he would confess that ‘I have suffered very materially in my health since I came here’. Convinced that he was no longer fit for the job, he would then ask Thomas to let Ambrose Pollett, a friend of the family, replace him in the firm. His physical condition would not let him endure another winter in Lisbon. In his last letter, dated 29 November, he once more complained about his health, saying that the cold weather caused him to ‘spit blood in considerable quantities from the lungs’ and that he was afraid he would never be able to return to his homeland again ‘since I fell [sic] persuaded I shall never get better of the severe illness I had in the Spring of the year 1816’. To him Lisbon, thus, ended up representing the proximity of death, that ultimate moment of displacement. His fears, however, were unfounded and he went back to England where he remained in convalescence, before returning to Portugal. But once more the climate did not agree with him. His health worsened, especially after hearing the news of his nephew’s death in December 1818, and he was compelled to leave Lisbon one last time.[3]

In the course of his stay, James was badly in need of a focal point to keep things in perspective and letter writing served such a purpose. More than anything else, it allowed him to keep his sense of belonging alive. These letters ended up being the only bridge not just to his origins, but above all to his own identity. He felt so helpless when his sister failed to reply to his letters that ‘it even grieves me to the heart when I reflect upon it’ (17 February 1816). This sentimentality towards his family is in marked contrast with his attitude as an observer. Although Hutchinson cannot entirely detach himself emotionally from what he witnesses, there is a kind of Verfremdungseffekt in his writing, a journalistic objectification of the topics he covers, whereby the distance between himself and the other is never to be entirely spanned.

4. Prying into a Gentleman’s Private Correspondence: Issues of Intimacy, Confidentiality and Objectivity in Translation

Translating something as intimate and confidential as private letters has the potential to border on voyeurism. It raises issues that concern the ethics of translation, since the translator, unlike the casual reader, is supposed to leave no stone unturned in his struggle to reach communicative effectiveness. His labour consists in unveiling all meanings, in ransacking the secrets of the author’s mind, and, if necessary, in exposing the frailties of his body. The innermost thoughts are not fenced off from the translator’s dissecting tools. In this sense, translation is to be viewed as an act of intrusion and, simultaneously, of extrusion (in other words a disclosure and a close examination of that which pertains to the private sphere). The former constitutes a form of violation, of disrupting that which belongs to the realm of the confessional and becoming, to borrow the words of St. Augustine, ‘privy to the secrets of conscience’; whereas the latter manifests itself in the form of violence, destroying the integrity of the textual body, vivisecting it and exhibiting it to the public gaze. Nevertheless, such violence is mitigated by the transmutational properties of time. Over time, these texts have acquired the status of archaeological evidence, which does not necessarily mean that in this respect the position of the translator is less delicate. After all, he was not the addressee of the letters and that fact alone poses some problems. An outsider may find it difficult to penetrate the referential fabric of the letters. Unlike travel accounts or autobiographies written for publication, these texts were not intended for a wide readership. They were personal in tone and content, and the writer knew what responses to expect from his only reader living across the English Channel. The writer did not project an ideal or fictional reader to whom he might grant full right of access to the world recreated in his prose. As a consequence, his world remains sealed off from a larger audience and the translator is forced to break into the textual space like a trespasser. Implicatures lie hidden within this corpus of letters but they can never be entirely unravelled: whatever inferences the translator may draw, he or she will always lack the necessary background knowledge to establish their validity. Such implicatures, one must not forget, are a symptom of the close relationship existing between the two correspondents. Implicit meanings result from a common experience, excluding other readers. Fortunately, the text in question is generally far more objective and factual than one would suppose, and this alone gives the translator significant leverage over the hidden aspects of the correspondence. It is in the terrain of factuality and narrativity that the translator moves free from major constraints, although it is certain that the faithfulness of the representation can never be taken for granted (see Polezzi 2004: 124).

Of course one cannot expect to find in such letters a precise and exhaustive portrait of Beresford’s Lisbon, systematically organised in such a way as to cover all possible angles. What we get instead is a myriad of disparate images that can hardly be coalesced into one single picture. The reason is obvious: the stories he tells do not follow any thematic pattern, other than the fact that all of them revolve around the city itself. Apart from the town of Sintra, a popular tourist resort in the nineteenth century, where he spent some time ‘for the benefit of my Health which, thank God I have recovered beyond my expectation’ (14 June 1816), he never set foot outside of the capital (or at least there is no archival evidence of him doing so) and therefore he apparently did not know what was going on in the rest of the country. His letters lack the ‘horror and pity’ William Warre experienced as he crossed the country chasing after the fleeing French army and encountering ‘many people and children absolutely starving and living upon nettles and herbs they gathered in the fields’ (Warre and Warre 1909: 222). Not even Sintra, that ‘glorious Eden’ with its ‘views more dazzling unto mortal ken than those whereof such things the Bard relates’, as Byron wrote in his celebrated Childe Harolds Pilgrimage (1812), succeeded in enrapturing our author, who preferred to remain faithful to whatever notable occurrences Lisbon had to offer the outsider’s gaze.

Hutchinson’s short narratives appear scattered throughout the letters in a rather random way, and it is their reading as anecdotal collages, rather than as a set of tightly-woven, interrelated stories, that allows the reader to gain a taste of the spontaneity of the narration and the ingenuousness of the narrator. Although the anecdotal episodes themselves are self-contained and refer only to fragments of both individual and collective experiences in early nineteenth-century Lisbon, they play an important part in the process of historiographical reconstruction of the past. The historiographical value of the letters lies in the fact that they contain accounts that were neither censored nor doctored: no one ever scrutinised or edited the stories, which were simply committed to paper without any concern for accuracy, trustworthiness or factuality. The ensemble of letters forms a sort of scrapbook containing clippings or mementos that were never meant to be published. Such moments, however, were bound together by a common genetic code: they all emerged out of the drive for novelty, a drive partly explained by the way the processes of cultural displacement affected the author.

However, when it comes to Hutchinson’s values and ideological assumptions, they are not readily easy to detect. He preferred to position himself as an observer rather than as a commentator, and avoided getting entangled in elaborate considerations. If the translator wants to gain a glimpse of his ideas and opinions, then he/she must proceed by engaging in a symptomatic reading of the letters, observing, for example, the way he framed and skewed the subject matter, or how he got himself more or less emotionally involved with the events he narrated, or simply how he refrained from passing judgement on what he saw. Far from highly opinionated, the letters nonetheless give us the chance of peering into his personality, albeit obliquely.

Sometimes, however, he felt compelled to take sides, such as when he dared to air his own opinion on Beresford:

...being the weaker power & finding himself defeated in all his projects, it is reported that he is about leaving [sic] the Country, which in my opinion is the wisest step he can take, else a worse fate may attend him. (11 April 1817)

Such explicitness was rare. Shortly after the rebellion in Pernambuco, Brazil, Hutchinson censured himself for letting slip his views on the political turmoil that had gripped the country and decided to not to return to the issue for fear of reprisals:

You are well aware that it is necessary to be very cautious how we treat upon political subjects in this Country, for which reason I avoid any thing of this nature, only sofar [sic] as I suppose it may be connected with the interests of Mercantile Affairs. (4 July 1817)

His fears over the consequences of political dissent were not wholly misplaced. The horrific hanging of the Conspirators he watched on 22 October 1817, shortly before his departure, left a lasting impression on him:

[C]uriosity led me to be one of the spectators of this awful scene & however disgraceful hanging may be in England I can assure you it is not less so here. The Executioner is obliged to ride astride the shoulders of every man he hangs.—It was about four O’Clock in the Afternoon when the Prisoners arrived at the foot of the Gallows & was about midnight when this melancholy scene closed.—After the Execution of all 7 out of the 11 were burnt on a Funeral Pile on the spot.

Here, his voyeurism matched his horror as he came to the full presence of death—that dark character that kept resurfacing in his writing.

5. Translation as a Double Disjuncture

As we have seen, what was once private acquires, over time, an archaeological value: the status of artefact is conferred on language as privacy metamorphoses into historical evidence. In translation, chronological distance is of the essence: one might even argue that every translation has embedded in its genes an indelible anachronism. In sharp contrast with our contemporary world, where synchronous forms of communication and instantaneous access to information seem to have taken hold of the way we communicate with each other, the art and craft of translation necessitates the slow transit of time. It is a painstaking process of problem-solving, reflection and maturation. It takes time and perseverance. And when it involves the representation of past historical phenomena, as in the present case, the temporal dimension acquires critical significance. On the one hand, the translator cannot help excogitating his own condition as a historical subject: he becomes conscious of the relativity of values, of the differentials separating lifestyles, habitus (in the Bourdieusian sense) and Weltanschauungen. On the other, the target text ends up constituting the representation of a representation and, as such, it is, as Althusser once stated of ideology, a representation of an ‘imaginary relationship of individuals to their real conditions of existence’ (Althusser 1971: 162). And here, in the translation process, the time gap separating source and target texts functions not so much as a thread linking both acts of writing along a historical continuum but rather as a lens, generating several simultaneous optical effects, where light shifts in unsuspected ways and where appearance must be understood in its composite and elusive nature. The world of the (author’s) ‘present’ can never be reconstructed as such in the target text. The translator necessarily operates in the time gap between two ‘presents’ (his/her own and the author’s). That is why the translator’s labour must be that of a conscious re-representation of history. This, of course, entails much scrupulous work of detailed historical research, as well as the ability to articulate it within the translational process.

The crux of the matter lies in being able to dwell in the interstices between two languages, two cultures and two historical periods. This is the translator’s privilege and the source of many of his tribulations. To be able to lay claim to the ability to contemplate the insurmountable differences that separate not only languages but also cultures, one is required to perceive how far one’s own consciousness depends not only on λόγος and on the chains of meanings that help one make sense of the world, but also on the points of rupture of discourse, those points where signifiers and signifieds (regardless of the language) can no longer encompass those phenomena that keep resisting appropriation, including the culture of the other. In other words, one must learn to come to terms with the undecidability which undermines the certainties offered by our ingrained logocentrism.

As the translator shifts, in the course of the translation process, from one logosphere (in the Barthesian sense) to another, he realises that the movement itself does not (actually, cannot) entail the loss or gain, subtraction or addition of meanings. Meaning does not constitute some sort of universal currency (that is, manifestations of a universal language common to all human beings) that can be subjected to a process of direct exchange or transaction. Meanings cannot migrate freely from one language to another. I can only subtract meanings within the system they belong to. Languages weave their own networks of meanings and the exact value of each meaning, if it can ever be assessed, is to be determined only symptomatically by the effects generated by its presence or absence in one particular social and cultural context. To believe in the transferability of the meaning and its capacity to survive as a whole in two distinct linguistic and cultural environments (as in a process of ecesis) is not to realise something that Derrida pointed out: that even within the same language meanings not only differ (a problem of spacing), but are forever deferred (which is the condition of their temporality). One of the main problems of translation, therefore, is not just spatiality but also temporality, particularly the historical condition of the texts.

And this, I think, poses an obstacle far more difficult to overcome, since it has to do with the impossibility for the translator to render two externalities compatible in one single (target) text. Just as Hutchinson was compelled, as an expatriate, to come to terms with the social and cultural reality of his host country[4] (which is, for all purposes, a question of spatiality), so the translator, like a migrant travelling through time, is forced to come to grips with an ancient world governed by laws long forsaken and now irretrievable (the question of temporality). And since both writer and translator are forever barred from a fully unmediated contact with the unconsciously lived culture of the Other, both seeing it as something external to themselves, though not necessarily negative, their attempts to assimilate cultural elements and national idiosyncrasies can only take place on the terrain of the imaginary, which enables them to crop, select, filter and reshape elements and idiosyncrasies in order to discursively tame the otherness. It is when the translator is trying to tackle texts of this nature that he feels – to allude to one of Derrida’s most quoted metaphors, borrowed from Shakespeare – that ‘time is out of joint’, namely that he is supposed to take up the writer’s voice, but without being able to adjust either to the discursive and ideological framework within which the texts once gained their coherence, or to the past ‘structure of feeling’ (to use one of Raymond Williams’s concepts of cultural analysis) that informed the emotions, thoughts and actions of the original writer (Williams 1965: 64-6).

Translators of travel writing therefore have to operate on a double disjuncture. On the one hand, they have to deal with the cultural gap that exists between the author and the people he visits (Hutchinson and the Portuguese), a gap which over-determines the perceptions, constructs, responses and projections of otherness of the British expat, but which -- since it is barely made explicit in the text -- can only be detected by means of a symptomatic reading. On the other hand, translators have to negotiate the disjunction that will always separate them from the time and the concrete conditions under which the texts saw the light of day -- a disjunction that is further amplified by the impossibility of mapping the exact location of the intersection of cultures which gives the letters their characteristic intercultural tension (see Cronin 2000: 6). Therefore, the translator is left with no choice but to try to overcome these two disjunctions, both of which constitute distinct moments of resistance to interpretation.

The translator’s path is strewn with obstacles, for the minute he or she starts translating the text that distinction is no longer clear: the two moments overlap and the barriers between them become blurred, since his or her gaze is constructed in and through the gaze of the expatriate. How can we then circumvent the limitations to translation that such a double disjuncture imposes? Of course a careful, detailed investigation into the empirical elements offered by the letters and the issues broached therein must always be conducted, but this is not enough: it can only be through a critical awareness of these tensions and resistances that translators may decentre themselves and avoid the pitfalls of identification and idealisation. It is this decentring at the core of translation that ends up being in itself a form of travelling. After all, ‘translatio’ in Latin means ‘carrying across’, ‘transporting’, ‘transferring’, and, in contrast to what we may think, it is not the source text that is ‘carried across’ to a target culture. It is rather the translator and his reader who are invited to venture across a frontier -- the frontier that sets the limits to their identities, values and representations, and that is both spatial and temporal.

In fact, the main challenges to the translation of these letters were posed by the problem of temporality, that is, by the difficulties of bridging the time gap. The first issue to be tackled was the stylistics of the Portuguese target text. It was not just a matter of finding the best equivalents and transferring contents from the source text into the target language without major semantic losses. It was also a matter of finding a style and a register that could somehow match the original ones. In order to do that, I compared the letters to similar archival and bibliographical sources in Portuguese. Two manuals of commercial correspondence proved invaluable: Arte da correspondência commercial ou modelos de cartas para toda a qualidade de operações mercantis [The Art of Commercial Letter Writing or Letter Templates for all Sorts of Trade Operations] (Anon.; 1824) and Monlon’s Arte da correspondência commercial ou escolha de cartas sobre o commercio [The Art of Commercial Letter Writing or a Selection of Business Letters] (1857), the only key style manuals of the day in this area still available for consultation in the Portuguese National Library. The analysis of the examples of letters allowed me to determine the way in which the target text was to be drafted.

One of the most complicated aspects I had to deal with was choosing the mode of address: the original letters invariably start with ‘Dear Brother’, and then the addressee is always referred to with the second person personal pronoun ‘you’. In Portuguese, this is not so linear. In the early nineteenth century, modes of address would have varied according not only to social class, age or degree of familiarity, but also to written language conventions. ‘You’ could be translated either as ‘Tu’ (too informal; the verb is conjugated in the second person singular), ‘Você’ (slightly more formal; the verb is conjugated in the third person singular), ‘Vossa Mercê’ (idem), or ‘Vós’ (more formal; verb conjugated in the second person plural), among several other possibilities. Back then, a relationship with a brother-in-law, close as it might have been, did not necessarily imply the use of the informal ‘tu’, since informality and closeness are not synonyms. The way Hutchinson closed the letters (‘Your ever Affectionate Brother’) bears witness to such emotional proximity, but it is far from being indicative of a relaxed, informal manner. The solution to the difficulty in ascertaining whether we were dealing with informality or politeness was partly given by the 1824 manual. The plural ‘Vós’ is used when addressing both singular and plural persons, but in some cases all we have is the initial ‘V—’, which could stand either for ‘Vós’, ‘Você’ or ‘Vossa Mercê’. When the ‘V—’; form occurs, the verb is conjugated in the third person singular, midway between formality and affable politeness. This was the form I resorted to throughout.

Another difficulty had to do with wording. The manuals proved useful in guiding my lexical choices. I wanted to give the translation a distinctive period flavour to represent the historical dimension of the original letters. For example, ‘company’ could be translated either as ‘sociedade’ or ‘empresa’, but these words barely appear in the 1824 manual, especially when referring to one’s own company. Instead, the commonest word is ‘caza’ [House] sometimes ‘caza de commercio’ (dated spelling), which I decided to adopt. Many more old-fashioned or outdated Portuguese words that appear in the manual were likewise retrieved: ‘embolço’ [imbursement]; ‘estimar’ [to believe; to guess];  ‘fazer-se de vella’ [to set sail]; ‘governo’ [management]; ‘sortimento’ [assortment]; ‘sortir’ [to sort; to provide]; ‘praça’ [exchange or financial centre; market]; ‘rogar’ [to beseech]. The manual was equally useful in providing formulaic language that was pretty close to some passages in Hutchinson’s letters: ‘Sacámos hoje sobre vós pelo importe da factura (…) L... a 60 dias á ordem de…’ [Today we drew on you for the sum of £… at sixty days]; ‘Vosso reverente servidor’ [Your very Obedient Servant]; ‘Por esta confirmamos a nossa circular de (…) desde a qual ainda não tivemos a satisfação de receber alguma vossa…’ [Without any of your Favors since mine of the … I have now to inform you…].

Another challenge was related to the commercial jargon both in English and in Portuguese. Nowadays commercial terminology in both languages is much more complex, but most of the neologisms that currently exist in Portuguese are English words. Back then, that influence was more tenuous. In any case, the search for the right equivalent would have always been time-consuming. ‘Bill’ alone, for instance, could be equivalent to as many things as ‘letra’, ‘letra de câmbio’, ‘saque’, ‘promissória’, ‘papel comercial’, ‘título de comércio’, ‘factura’, or ‘facturação’. If we multiply this by the wide spectrum of nomenclatures related to those areas of economic activity Hutchinson was directly or indirectly involved in, we have an idea of the complexity of the task.

To start with, there were the inner workings of the wool trade business. I had to unwind the ball of yarn of the English wool and worsted industry, including all the details concerning the different stages of the manufacturing process: recognising the provenance and differences in quality of the raw wool available in both the Portuguese and Spanish markets, the various patterns of the warp and weft, the way the cloth should be cut or dressed, specific types of woollen cloths, their designs and colours, and so on. One particular stumbling block was the enigmatic ‘37 R., 6 F., 4 S., 1 T. & 11 A.’ (letter dated 9 August 1816). It took me a while before I learnt from a magazine published in London in 1804 (Tilloch 1807: 239-42) that the initials did not stand for any English or Portuguese words, but for Spanish ones. They referred to the way Spanish wool (which also included Portuguese wool) was classified: Primera or Refina (R.), Fina (F.), Segunda (S.), Tercera (T.) and Añinos (A.).

Moreover, since conducting business ventures overseas back then was not without its risks, I had to acquaint myself with the idiom used in cargo and shipping insurance, learn about risk-assessment, shipping deadlines, storage conditions, bills of lading, types of merchant ships crossing the Atlantic, and so on. But then there are also taxes and duties, customs procedures and the requirements of port authorities, the valuation of the bales in the Cocket,[5] goods lodged at the Custom House not yet dispatched -- all of this wrapped up in a language of its own, which has to be patiently disassembled, explored, digested, and then reassembled and fine-tuned in the translation process. In order to penetrate that language I had to resort to historical research once more. I visited the ‘Torre do Tombo’ (the Portuguese National Archives) and consulted the records from the customs houses that existed in Lisbon at that time: the ‘Alfândega Grande do Açúcar’, the ‘Alfândega das Sete Casas’, the ‘Alfândega da Casa dos Cinco’ and the ‘Casa da Índia’, the first of which provided invaluable information about the duties on wools and worsted, the classification of wools and of all sorts of cloths, their quantities and provenance, and so on. In the records of the ‘Casa da Índia’, the inventory of the cargo of the French ship Le Commerciant [sic], seized in the summer of 1809, reminds us of the risks faced by merchants like Hutchinson.

I adopted a domesticating approach to a certain extent, adding explanatory footnotes whenever words, phrases or referents might challenge the modern reader’s understanding of the target text. However, since the Revista de Estudos Anglo-Portugueses is aimed at a scholarly readership, it proved unnecessary to insist on the explanation of cultural or linguistic aspects that they are supposed to be already acquainted with. Differences in style between early nineteenth-century and early twenty-first-century Portuguese are noticeable, but they do not make the text less intelligible. In any case, stylistic conventions should not pose a problem for all the scholars who are used to working with documents of that period. So I kept the footnotes to a minimum. The future publication of a book containing the complete correspondence of the Farrer family, this time aiming at a more general readership, will entail a different explanatory methodology, but not a different stylistic treatment.

6. Conclusions

Writing narratives of displacement and travel is in itself a translational act, where the author is always seeking to translate into his mother tongue the manifestations of the culture of the other.[6] The translator of travel writing, in turn, operates on a double disjuncture – the gap between the author and the visited culture, on the one hand, and the gap between the translator and the author, on the other – threefold if you include the inevitable temporal disjuncture. In the process, the translator is forced to question his identity, values and the representations of his own nation and people, especially if the original text is non-fictional and therefore stakes a claim to the immediacy and truthfulness of the experience. The translator thus has to achieve a tour-de-force in bridging all three gaps and rendering the text accessible to the contemporary reader. However, the meanings in the target text will always have but a spectral relation with the ones in the source text: they are constructed at the same time as a re-apparition of a former presence (that does not present itself as full presence) and as the apparition of a new presence –a new text in its own right. This distance between the source and target texts becomes more difficult to span when historical time – fissured as it has been, in this particular case, over these past two centuries by sudden ruptures and discontinuities – keeps eroding the paths that could render the source text recognisable to the reader: hence the importance of the translator’s historical consciousness and the necessity of articulating historical research with the translation process, since any translation of historical material that disregards the intelligibility of historical processes lacks the authority to stake claims to accuracy and credibility.

References

Althusser, Louis (1971) Lenin and Philosophy and Other Essays, trans B. Brewster, London, New Left Books.

Bethell, Leslie (1984) Colonial Brazil, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Borges de Macedo, Jorge (1963) Problemas da História da Indústria Portuguesa no Século XVIII, PhD diss, University of Lisbon, Portugal.

Casas Pardo, José (ed.) (1992) Economic effects of the European expansion, 1492-1824, Stuttgart, Steiner Verlag.

Cronin, Michael (2000) Across the Lines: Travel, Language, Translation, Cork, Cork University Press.

Fletcher, J. S. (1919) The Story of the English Town of Leeds, New York, Macmillan.

Gentzler, Edwin (1993) Contemporary Translation Theories, Clarendon, Multilingual Matters.

Glover, Michael (1976) “Beresford and His Fighting Cocks”, History Today 26, no. 4: 262-8.

Lopes, António (2009) “Cartas inéditas de um jovem burguês 1815-1817” (1.ª parte) [“Unpublished letters of a young bourgeois 1815-1817” (1st part)], Revista de Estudos Anglo Portugueses, no. 18: 93-133.

--- (2010) “Cartas inéditas de um jovem burguês 1815-1817” (2.ª parte) [‘Unpublished letters of a young bourgeois 1815-1817’ (2nd part)], Revista de Estudos Anglo Portugueses no. 19: 175-204.

Maxwell, Kenneth (2004) Conflicts and Conspiracies: Brazil and Portugal, 1750-1808, London, Routledge.

Newitt, Malyn (2004) Lord Beresford and British Intervention in Portugal, 1807-1820, Lisbon, Imprensa de Ciências Sociais.

Pijning, Ernst (1997) “Passive resistance: Portuguese diplomacy of contraband trade during King John V’s reign (1706-1750)”, Arquipélago – História 2, no. 2, 171-191.

Polezzi, Loredana (2004) “Between Gender and Genre: The Travels of Estella Canziani” in Perspectives on Travel Writing, Glenn Hooper and Tim Youngs (eds), Aldershot, Ashgate: 121-37.

Tilloch, Alexander (1807) The Philosophical Magazine: Comprehending the Various Branches of Science, the Liberal and Fine Arts, Agriculture, Manufactures and Commerce. vol. 27. London, R. Taylor.

books.google.pt/books?id=fp9JAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false (accessed 15 April 2011)

Warre William, and Edmond Warre (1909) Letters from the Peninsula, 1808-1812, London, John Murray.

Williams, Raymond (1965 [1961]) The Long Revolution, Harmondsworth, Penguin.

Notes

[1] Ref. No. E 140/34/1. Records of the Exchequer: King's Remembrancer: Exhibits: Farrer (and another) v Hutchinson (and others). Scope and content: Letters to Thomas Farrer from his brother-in-law, James Hutchinson (Jnr.), in Lisbon. Covering dates: 1815-1817.

[2] Manuel J. G. de Abreu Vidal. Análise da sentença proferida no juízo da inconfidencia em 15 de Outubro de 1817 contra o Tenente General Gomes Freire de Andrade, o Coronel Manoel Monteiro de Carvalho e outros... pelo crime de alta traição. Lisboa, Morandiana, 1820; José Dionísio da Serra. Epicedio feito, e recitado em 1822 no anniversario da sempre lamentável morte do General Gomes Freire de Andrade. Paris, 1832; Joaquim Ferreira de Freitas. Memoria sobre a conspiraçaõ [sic] de 1817: vulgarmente chamada a conspiração de Gomes Freire. London, Richard and Arthur Taylor, 1822.

[3] He outlived Thomas (who died circa 1820) and was appointed executor of his brother-in-law’s estate.

[4] A process E. Gentzler (1993: 37) calls ‘domestication’.

[5] A customs office in Britain where detailed records of exports were kept.

[6] On the relation between travel and translation see Lesa Scholl (2009) “Translating Culture: Harriet Martineau’s Eastern Travels” in Travel Writing, Form, and Empire: The Poetics and Politics of Mobility, Julia Kuehn and Paul Smethurst (eds), London, Routledge; Susan Bassnett and André Lefevere (1998) Constructing Cultures: Essays on Literary Translation, Clevedon, Multilingual Matters; and Susan Bassnett (2002) Translation Studies, London, Methuen.

 

About the author(s)

Antonio Manuel Bernardo Lopes, PhD in English Culture, MA in Anglo-Portuguese Studies (specialty in English Literature) and BA in Modern Languages and Literatures
(English and German), is Senior Lecturer (Professor-Adjunto) in English Studies with the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures at the School of Education
and Communication, University of Algarve, where he teaches English language, literature and culture, literary analysis and supervises ELT postgraduate projects. He is
also the director of studies of postgraduate programmes in ELT and translation. He is a researcher at the Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies
(FCHS/UNL and FLUP), working with the following research groups: Anglo-Portuguese Studies; Literature, Media and Discourse Analysis; British Culture and History. He
has also participated in several European-funded projects related to teacher training and computer-assisted language learning. He is currently the EUROCALL
representative in Portugal. His doctoral dissertation is entitled The Last Fight Let Us Face: Communist Discourse in Great Britain and the Spanish Civil War.

Email: [please login or register to view author's email address]

©inTRAlinea & António Lopes (2013).
"Translating Echoes Challenges in the Translation of the Correspondence of a British Expatriate in Beresford’s Lisbon 1815-17"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: Translating 18th and 19th Century European Travel Writing
Edited by: Susan Pickford & Alison E. Martin
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/1967

La traduzione e i suoi paratesti: introduzione

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"La traduzione e i suoi paratesti: introduzione"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2484

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"La traduzione e i suoi paratesti: introduzione"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2484

Di scarpe, di vestiti e di nobili svestiti:

usi e costumi nella traduzione dei titoli di Andersen

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Di scarpe, di vestiti e di nobili svestiti: usi e costumi nella traduzione dei titoli di Andersen"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2483

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Di scarpe, di vestiti e di nobili svestiti: usi e costumi nella traduzione dei titoli di Andersen"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2483

Le traduzioni dell’Evgenij Onegin di Ettore Lo Gatto (1925 & 1937) e il loro paratesto

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Le traduzioni dell’Evgenij Onegin di Ettore Lo Gatto (1925 & 1937) e il loro paratesto"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2482

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Le traduzioni dell’Evgenij Onegin di Ettore Lo Gatto (1925 & 1937) e il loro paratesto"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2482

Le note del Belli ai “popolari discorsi”

Polifunzionalità del paratesto nei sonetti romaneschi

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Le note del Belli ai “popolari discorsi” Polifunzionalità del paratesto nei sonetti romaneschi"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2481

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Le note del Belli ai “popolari discorsi” Polifunzionalità del paratesto nei sonetti romaneschi"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2481

Hapax traduttivi: titoli senza contesto

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Hapax traduttivi: titoli senza contesto"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2480

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Hapax traduttivi: titoli senza contesto"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2480

Una nota a margine

Giaime Pintor e Rilke: storia delle edizioni

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Una nota a margine Giaime Pintor e Rilke: storia delle edizioni"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2479

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Una nota a margine Giaime Pintor e Rilke: storia delle edizioni"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2479

Tradurre Hofmannsthal nell’Italia del secondo dopoguerra:

i paratesti delle edizioni Cederna e Vallecchi

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Tradurre Hofmannsthal nell’Italia del secondo dopoguerra: i paratesti delle edizioni Cederna e Vallecchi"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2478

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Tradurre Hofmannsthal nell’Italia del secondo dopoguerra: i paratesti delle edizioni Cederna e Vallecchi"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2478

Il paratesto dei traduttori di teatro contemporaneo dal francese verso l’italiano

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Il paratesto dei traduttori di teatro contemporaneo dal francese verso l’italiano"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2477

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Il paratesto dei traduttori di teatro contemporaneo dal francese verso l’italiano"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2477

Cortigiano, politico e uomo di mondo

Titolo e destinatario nelle traduzioni dell’Oráculo manual y arte de prudencia di B. Gracián (1647)

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Cortigiano, politico e uomo di mondo Titolo e destinatario nelle traduzioni dell’Oráculo manual y arte de prudencia di B. Gracián (1647)"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2476

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Cortigiano, politico e uomo di mondo Titolo e destinatario nelle traduzioni dell’Oráculo manual y arte de prudencia di B. Gracián (1647)"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2476

Il lettore del contesto

Visione e responsabilità di un editore di progetto alla luce dei paratesti di traduzione

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Il lettore del contesto Visione e responsabilità di un editore di progetto alla luce dei paratesti di traduzione"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2475

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Il lettore del contesto Visione e responsabilità di un editore di progetto alla luce dei paratesti di traduzione"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2475

Cappotti e ispettori generali: un Gogol’ italiano

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Cappotti e ispettori generali: un Gogol’ italiano"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2474

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"Cappotti e ispettori generali: un Gogol’ italiano"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2474

“Traduire est chose vile”: l’Avis au Lecteur nella traduzione francese secentesca

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"“Traduire est chose vile”: l’Avis au Lecteur nella traduzione francese secentesca"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2473

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"“Traduire est chose vile”: l’Avis au Lecteur nella traduzione francese secentesca"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2473

“Il traduttore a chi legge?”

La fenomenologia della prefazione alle traduzioni italiane del Settecento

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"“Il traduttore a chi legge?” La fenomenologia della prefazione alle traduzioni italiane del Settecento"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2472

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2020).
"“Il traduttore a chi legge?” La fenomenologia della prefazione alle traduzioni italiane del Settecento"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: La traduzione e i suoi paratesti
Edited by: Gabriella Catalano & Nicoletta Marcialis
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2472

Fluid Images — Fluid Text:

By The Editors

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & The Editors (2019).
"Fluid Images — Fluid Text:"
inTRAlinea News
Edited by: {specials_editors_news}
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2471

©inTRAlinea & The Editors (2019).
"Fluid Images — Fluid Text:"
inTRAlinea News
Edited by: {specials_editors_news}
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2471

Transmedial turn? Potentials, Problems, and Points to Consider

By The Editors

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & The Editors (2019).
"Transmedial turn? Potentials, Problems, and Points to Consider"
inTRAlinea News
Edited by: {specials_editors_news}
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2470

©inTRAlinea & The Editors (2019).
"Transmedial turn? Potentials, Problems, and Points to Consider"
inTRAlinea News
Edited by: {specials_editors_news}
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2470

Using Corpora in Contrastive and Translation Studies (6th edition)

By The Editors

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & The Editors (2019).
"Using Corpora in Contrastive and Translation Studies (6th edition)"
inTRAlinea News
Edited by: {specials_editors_news}
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2469

©inTRAlinea & The Editors (2019).
"Using Corpora in Contrastive and Translation Studies (6th edition)"
inTRAlinea News
Edited by: {specials_editors_news}
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2469

Introduction: New Perspectives in Dialect and Multimedia Translation

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"Introduction: New Perspectives in Dialect and Multimedia Translation"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2467

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"Introduction: New Perspectives in Dialect and Multimedia Translation"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2467

Subtitling dialect in Inspector Montalbano and Young Montalbano

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Abstract & Keywords

[N.B. Abstract and keywords required]

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"Subtitling dialect in Inspector Montalbano and Young Montalbano"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2466

Introduction

A growing number of audiovisual products are multilingual films, where the co-existence of more than one language reveals recurrent use of code-switching and intralinguistic and interlinguistic translation. They suggest natural aspects of human communication not only in a multicultural context where different cultures come into contact, but also for the switch between dialects and sociolects within the same language community. When talking about multilingualism, Delabastita and Grutman (2005: 15) include the presence of dialects as substandard varieties of language ‘existing within the various officially recognized languages, and indeed sometimes cutting across and challenging our neat linguistic typologies.’ The scholars underline the importance of the ‘textual interplay’ (2005: 16) of languages, that is the function and effect they produce in the definition of character and in the development of the plot.

A regional language variety is identified by its own specific lexicon, non-standard grammar and distinctive accent, and, above all, it is closely related to a specific place and social group (Díaz Cintas & Remael 2009: 191). Therefore, the use of dialect often carries strong socio-cultural and connotative implications, charged with emotional and phatic meaning, besides its mere referential and denotative function, determining a ‘translation crisis point’ (Pedersen 2005: 1) in the tension between centrifugal forces of normalization, on one hand, and the desire to convey the communicative force of the original text, on the other.

The aim of the paper is to describe the sociocultural function and effect expressed by Sicilian dialects on the representation of identity and analyse the strategies used to convey the linguistic variation in the English subtitles of the popular and widely exported Italian TV series Il Commissario Montalbano/Inspector Montalbano and of its equally fortunate prequel Il Giovane Montalbano/ Young Montalbano. The research aims to analyse culturally embedded language elements, which is the use of dialectal lexicon and syntax, of figurative language and register in order to highlight alterations produced in the representation of Sicilian culture through deletion or reinforcement of old stereotypes. Is it possible to detect any compensation strategies put forward to mitigate such transformations and losses and to retain the pragmatic force of dialect?

1. The translation of dialect between foreignization and domestication

The multimedia translation of dialect represents an evident challenge and a complex matter that pertains sociolinguistics and ideological values of normative behaviour, with a pressing urge for creativity through the discharge of unexpected translation solutions (Armstrong and Federici 2006; Federici 2009; 2011; Marrano, Nadiani and Rundle 2009; Ranzato 2010; 2016). The recent trend is for films to exploit regional language varieties and dialects to communicate cultural otherness and reinforce credibility. While the source audience is exposed to a very specific geographical and socio-cultural setting, translators, as cultural mediators (Katan 2004), balance the core tension of their demanding task between the necessity to convey the source text (ST) intentions and a commitment to fluency and clarity in the target text (TT).

Issues of intercultural communication and of a multicultural approach to translation come to the fore when dealing with such a complex and composite topic as the one of subtitling dialect. Being deeply embedded in a specific socio-cultural and geographical context, dialects represent independent linguistic systems belonging to specific speech communities and cultures. Therefore ‘(t)he issue is no longer that of technical explanations of a different term, but that of explaining different sets of behaviours and culture-bound practices’ (Katan 2014: 61). The conventional view of language transfer based on a mono-cultural approach to translation relies on the existence of subjective framing of external experience. In order to depart from an ethnocentric approach to translation, the Venutian parameters of foreignizing and domesticating translation strategies (Venuti 1995) have proved useful indicators of distancing of the TT from the ST. However, as argued by the Danish scholar Henrik Gottlieb (2014), when it comes to account for the translation of culturally embedded language, the choice of a foreignizing strategy, like for instance retention of a foreign word, might not be sufficient to avoid misinterpretations and to ensure visibility to the translator, but may contribute to reinforce common stereotypes. On the other hand, as the intentions and values conveyed by the use of dialect in translation resist categorical solutions, a domesticating strategy may provide more effective adaptation. Therefore ‘foreignizing strategies in subtitling may lead to invisibility instead’ (ibid. 32). This happens not only in the case of what he calls downstream translation, that is from a dominant language like English to a secondary language, but it is also true for upstream translation, as in this case, from Italian into English, where retention or direct translation of a dialectal lexeme may reinforce misperceptions and stereotypical traits.

2. Subtitling strategies

As pointed out by many scholars, subtitling is the result of a diamesic shift from speech to writing where the end product has undergone a considerable process of reduction due to the different nature of the target medium bound by time and space constraints. This implies standardization of language varieties and of the prosodic features of spoken discourse, as well as alterations in register variation, accounting for language used in a specific context of situation. On the other hand, Ivarsson and Carol (1998:157) recommend that the language register should be appropriate to the spoken word, manifesting an evident challenge for the subtitler who should find ways of suggesting the presence of language variation and code-switching without forgetting language correctness. Although the use of dialect expresses the core of the interpersonal and emotional relationship between interlocutors, this inevitably finds alteration in translation. As pointed out by David Katan (2004), the context of situation is interconnected with the context of culture, which is determined by subjective beliefs and values framing an individual perception of the world. Therefore, linguistic meaning can only be fully conveyed if both contexts are familiar to the translator.

Decisions concerning text reduction are closely linked to the principle of relevance (Gutt 1991), which supersedes linguistic issues, concerning not only the translation of meaning, but also of the purpose and function of the ST. The role of dialects and code-switching in the construction of characters’ identities is evident and it challenges the general concern for readability. As suggested by Gottlieb (2012), the central concern is to retain the translation of ‘speech acts’, that is to say ‘verbal intentions and the corresponding paraverbal and visual features’ (ibid. 50), more relevant than single words in understanding the core of the source language (SL).

2.1. Levels of analysis

Culturally embedded language refers to two levels of analysis, which are the encyclopaedic and the linguistic levels (Gottlieb 2014). Culture-bound lexical items that refer to an additive and culture-specific knowledge of the world pertain the encyclopaedic level of language. Among the Translation Studies scholars addressing this matter, Pedersen (2011) labels them as Extralinguistic Cultural References (ECR). They are extralinguistic context related words since they refer to entities outside language, while still verbally expressed, and are closely related to a specific culture. In other words, an ECR is a ‘reference that is attempted by means of any cultural linguistic expression, which refers to an extralinguistic entity or process’ (Pedersen 2011: 43). This will be immediately recognized as belonging to the encyclopaedic knowledge that is shared by the ‘relevant audience’. In offering a categorization of ECRs, Pedersen intentionally avoids using the term taxonomy, because of the hierarchical connotation of the word and of the non-exhaustive nature of his list. Instead, he chooses to speak of different domains that ‘could be regarded as the top hypernym of the ECRs in that domain’ (2011: 58). They are weights and measures, proper names (personal, geographical, institutional, brand names), professional titles, food and beverage, and so on (Pedersen 2011: 59-60), whose translation will be determined by a set of different influencing parameters.

At the linguistic level, culture-bound language pertains to the semantic and syntactic levels of language-specific features including the use of dialects, sociolects, ethnolects, that is specific lexicon and set phrases. The latter category includes phraseological units such as similes, metaphors, clichés, idioms and proverbs, frequently occurring in regional language. Besides the degree of fixedness of the constituents and the obscurity of meaning they may produce if considering the separate morphemes, they represent semantic and syntactic units without clear-cut definitions. In fact, as for most idioms, Gottlieb (1997: 315) suggests that, far from being opaque and fixed, they resemble ‘a metaphorical phrase with unmistakable connotations’ and after analysing different definitions, he takes the argument further by saying that ‘it would be tempting to define idioms as “expressions” which cannot be translated word for word’ (1997: 316). In translation, idioms and other phraseological units are considered not only in terms of decoding but essentially of encoding processes that besides formal, stylistic issues also consider the intended effect on the reader.

2.2. Subtitling taxonomies

A taxonomy of translation strategies will refer to the model developed by Gottlieb (2014: 38) in consideration of previous research (Nedergaard-Larsen 1993; Leppihalme 1997; Pedersen 2005: 2011). The microstrategies are arranged in relation to the macrostrategies of foreignization and domestication, indicating respectively a higher of lower degree of fidelity to the source culture (SC). At the encyclopaedic level of ECRs, Retention is the most foreignizing strategy followed by Direct translation, which refers to translating through calques or what is commonly referred to as word for word translation. Moderate domesticating strategies are Specification,[1] operating a semantic shift to a more specific meaning as for hyponymy, and Generalization that moves from the more specific to the general. At the opposite extreme to foreignization, Substitution indicates the deletion of the ST ECR with the use of either a better-known ECR, pertaining the SC or the target culture (TC), or a completely different solution. In the latter scenario substitution becomes very similar to omission that represents the least faithful type of transfer.

Macrostrategy

Degree of fidelity

Microstrategy

ECRs

Dialectal lexemes and set phrases

Foreignizing

Maximum

Retention

High

Direct Translation

Domesticating

Moderate

Specification

Explicitation/Addition/Reformulation

Generalization

Reduction

Generalization

Condensation

Low

Substitution

Missing

Omission

Table 1: Translation and strategies for ECRs, dialectal lexemes and set phrases

At the linguistic level, the taxonomy is adapted to account for the transformations that occur for dialectal lexicon and set phrases. As already pointed out by Pedersen (2011: 79), the term Specification may be used in a broader sense as Explicitation, considering that a dialect word could be translated by a more specific term or that a linguistic element could be added or reformulated, making a word or a sentence more explicit by modifying their syntactical structure (Perego 2003).

Díaz Cintas and Remael (2009: 145-162) focus on the macrostrategy of Reduction that, at word level, becomes Generalization, through the use of near-synonyms or hyperonymy, or Condensation, simplifying verbal periphrases, reducing compound terminology, and so on. Whereas, at sentence level, the latter strategies account for changes in the grammatical structures, that is transforming questions into statements, simplifying modality, and so on.

A further thought concerns the strategy of substitution when it comes to the subtitling of set phrases. In his study on the translation of idioms, Gottlieb (1997: 320) suggested considering the macrocategory of ‘idiomatization’ to account for cases of substitution of a phrase with no particular idiomatic strength that is rendered idiomatically, to compensate for previous deletions in the ST. This is often more effective than trying to render a ST idiom by choosing stylistic resemblance that causes the loss of semantic equivalence. In this case, the ‘conceptual paradox’ suggests that ‘idiomaticity in translation sometimes means that idioms should not be rendered with idioms.’ (1997: 318) and therefore compensation strategies come as a resource to foster SC understanding.

3. Subtitling Montalbano

Both TV-series Inspector Montalbano and Young Montalbano are based on Andrea Camilleri’s novels centred on the investigations of the Sicilian inspector Salvo Montalbano. The author, who is also the screenwriter, has reached unprecedented popularity in Italy and has travelled worldwide, thanks to the translation of his novels in over 30 languages and to the positive response to the TV series. A number of authors have addressed the challenges posed by translating Camilleri’s ‘unpredictable and whimsical interspersing of the narrative’ (Cipolla 2006: 14-15) with a mixture of dialectal features, in literary translation (Consiglio 2008; Sartarelli 2004; Taffarel 2012; Tomaiuolo 2009). As for the TV-series, broadcast in 16 countries, Montalbano has been both dubbed and subtitled, although audiences worldwide have shown a preference for the latter mode of audiovisual translation that offers the possibility to gain some understanding of ST prosody. Previous research focused on how the translation of dialect affects character representation in the passage from the novel to the screen (Kapsaskis and Artegiani 2011). Also, different subtitled versions of the episodes produced in Anglophone countries have been the central focus of comparative analysis with particular reference to the translation of humour and food (Dore 2017, Dore 2019).

3.1 Understanding Sicilianità (being Sicilian)

The sense of Sicilianità and local identity, addressed by a number of critics as the main key to explaining Camilleri’s appeal (Pezzotti 2012), is conveyed through three main traits: first, a sense of place built through reference to real Sicilian locations and to fictional places that become familiar to the audience; second, a sense of local identity embedded in sociocultural features such as the use of a marked theatrical prosody and the inspector’s absolute pleasure for local cuisine; third, a unique use of language made up of a mixture of ‘Italianized Sicilian and Sicilianized Italian’ (Cipolla 2006: 18).

In an interview (Sorgi 2000: 79), Camilleri speaks of himself as ‘un artigiano della scrittura (a craftsman of writing)’ who regards dialect not as an alternative to standard Italian but as its most vital component and a language in its own right. Therefore, he invents a creative mixture, inspired by the one in use in his own family in the Agrigento region and calls it italiano bastardo (Pistelli 2003: 23), a homely and emotional language where the use of code-switching is not limited to specific situations and social class but belongs to the language texture. At a lexical level, the features are (Vizmuller Zucco 2001): (1) the hybridization of words produced by ‘the adaptation of a linguistic form to the morphological system of another linguistic code’ (Berruto 1987: 170, quoted in  Consiglio 2008: 50), for example the use of a Sicilian word, like taliari/to see, attached to a standard Italian verb suffix and becoming taliare; (2) the insertion of Sicilian buzz words into Italian utterances, that is cabbasisi, or frequent occurrence of ECRs for food and regional dishes, as for example: sfincione, cuddiruni, and so on. At a syntactical level (Sulis 2007), there are only minor changes that consist in the forward shift of the verb at the end of the sentence like for instance in the Inspector’s notorious introductory phrase Montalbano sono instead of the standard Sono Montalbano/I’m/It’s/This is Montalbano, and in the use of past tense instead of the standard present perfect that represents a typical trait of Southern regional speech. Besides this language mixture, Vitzmuller Zucco (2002) has identified four more language varieties present in the novels and in the TV-series: (1) standard Italian used by Montalbano’s superiors and in more formal interviews; (2) a hyper-formal bureaucratic language marked by obsolete words as for the use of exaggerated titles; (3) a more embedded local variety of Sicilian dialect modelled on the one spoken in Porto Empedocle, found in local phrases, idioms and proverbs, for example Matri, ca su beddi sti picciriddi/Mamma mia, che sono belli questi bambini/Mother of mine! Look at how cute these children are!; (4) Catarella’s idiolect made up of malapropisms and invented words. Furthermore, in the TV-series, the use of a marked Sicilian accent and intonation, as well as the frequent use of question tags (…, eh?, …, vero?...., va bene?) and repetitions becomes an essential trait for paratextual exegesis. Code-switching between varieties of dialect rarely produces misunderstandings in the Italian audience, but it clearly conveys the sense of cultural ‘otherness’ within the frame of standard Italian, generating the need for intralinguistic translation and, at times, occasional recourse to an unknown word. In some cases, intradiegetic explanation is provided through the use of repetition, insertion of Italian synonyms, or making a non-Sicilian character ask for clarification.

3.2 The role of dialect

According to Alfonzetti (1998: 181), Italian dialects should be viewed as ‘separate systems rather than mere varieties of the same linguistic system.’ As a consequence of this rich and multifaceted conversational repertoire, the use of code-switching represents not only a diaglossic movement between Italian and dialect, in well-defined external socio linguistic domains, but is better conveyed through the concept of dilalìa (Berruto 1987) which accounts for the switch occurring between different varieties used in overlapping communicative domains and displaying an array of different functions. Most of the characters switch between these varieties depending mainly on the relationship between interlocutors rather than on their social status. Dialects guarantee a socio-cultural context (Leppihalme, 2000:264) with the main aims of generating humour and showing emotional involvement.

Screen adaptation presents considerable reduction in the amount of dialect; therefore, the Italian audience requires less effort compared to the reader (Kapsaskis and Artegiani 2011). On the other hand, the language is marked by a distinctive accent, intonation, facial expressions, posture, kinesics, and so on (Culperer 2001). Montalbano and his peers mainly use Italian with occasional code-switching with italiano bastardo, whereas local Sicilian dialect is used by minor supporting characters, interpreted by Sicilian professional or semi-professional actors who, through their gestures and marked facial expressions, provide a sense of authenticity to the plot. Moreover, the presence of dialect does not necessarily involve a change of register from formal to informal language. Age, social distance, and respect for hierarchies determine the maintaining of a formal register in conversation even when the speakers are illiterate people.

4. The case study

The corpus used for the present study includes 4 episodes respectively from series 1, 3, 7 and 8 of Inspector Montalbano (M)[2] and 3 episodes including the first and the last of the prequel Young Montalbano (YM), all subtitled by Acorn Media, UK. The data was manually checked and the choice of the episodes from different series was dictated by the search for consistency in the use of dialect in the original dialogue.

Series

M episodes

Rai

BBC4

Duration

No. of utterances

Italian utterances

Dialect utterances

1

Il ladro di merendine

The Snack Thief (M/ST)

1999

2012

1h. 45m.

735

651

89%

84

11%

3

Gita a Tindari

Excursion to Tindari (M/ET)

2001

2008

1h. 55m.

778

662

85%

116

15%

7

La Vampa d’Agosto

August Flame (M/AF)

2008

2012

1h. 45m.

1,003

884

88%

119

12%

8

La caccia al Tesoro

Treasure Hunt (M/TH)

2011

2012

1h. 40m.

708

616

87%

92

13%

 

Subtotal

 

 

 

3,224

2,813

87%

411

13%

 

Series

YM episodes

Rai

BBC4

Duration

No. of utterances

Italian utterances

Dialect utterances

1

Il primo caso

The first case (YM/FC)

2012

2013

1h. 58m.

918

702

76%

216

24%

1

Ferito a morte

Mortally Wounded (YM/MW)

2012

2013

1h. 50m.

830

592

71%

238

29%

2

Un’albicocca

An apricot (YM/A)

2015

2016

1h. 45m.

730

618

85%

112

15%

 

Subtotal

 

 

 

2,478

1,912

77%

566

23%

 

Total

 

 

12h. 38m.

5,702

4,725

83%

977

17%

Table 2. The episodes in the corpus

Table 2, starting from the left, accommodates the titles of the episodes analyzed, the year of first broadcast on Italian Rai and British BBC4, the duration of each episode, and the number of utterances, in order to quantify the actual presence of dialect in relation to standard Italian. For the purpose of the present study, utterances, chosen as units of measurement for the analysis of spoken dialogue, correspond to the turns, i.e. ‘chunks of talk that are marked off by a shift of speaker’ (Traum and Heeman 1997: 125). Thus, a turn finishes when another speaker starts talking: this means that its length may vary considerably according speaker interruptions or earlier responses, nonetheless, it offers the advantage of presenting clear-cut boundaries. The figures show a higher percentage of dialect in YM, reflecting the intention of the author and the leading actor, Michele Riondino (2013), of feeling freer to use code-switching into the local dialect more than in the preceding TV series.

4.1 The methodology

For the purpose of the present study, the descriptive analysis will present both quantitative and qualitative data, focusing on the subtitling strategies used for the following domains: (1) ECRs, delimited to proper names, that are personal, geographical, institutional, brand names, professional titles and food; (2) language-specific features such as the use of a dialectal lexicon; (3) the use of dialectal set phrases including ways of saying, idiomatic expressions, proverbs and figures of speech such as metaphors and similes. These elements all carry the main function of enhancing the rethorical effect and signalling to the translator ‘matters as intended meaning, implied meaning, presupposed meaning’ (Hatim and Mason 1997: 33) of the ST embedded in a specific socio-cultural context. Moreover, the study will include a qualitative analysis of the subtitling strategies used for the following features: variation in the syntactical construction, use of dialectal grammar, language–specific pragmatic features such as forms of address, repetition, suprasegmental prosodic elements, such as intonation, stress and rhythm.

The tables 3 and 4 show, in bold, examples of dialect or Italianized phrases and, in italics, of Italian ECRs, with a back translation in square brackets, when necessary. Retention is the subtitling strategy that is mostly used for ECRs in particular when belonging to the domains of proper names and food. In (1), cuddiruni represents the only case of a Sicilian ECR maintained in the subtitle, whereas more frequent are the cases of retention of Italian ECRs for food such as focaccia and pecorino. The borrowing is motivated by the fact that Livia, Montalbano’s partner, is not Sicilian, triggering a necessary intradiegetic explanation of the term. In (2), there is the first instance of the food ECR panelle, that occurs twice in the whole corpus and is subtitled using different strategies. In YM, the ECR is retained. Excerpt (3) is the only case of borrowing of a set phrase; the proverb in the Genovese dialect Omo piccin, tutto belin, not meant to be entirely clear to the Italian audience, is maintained unintelligible to the target audience.

Episode

Character

Original dialogue

Subtitle

YM/A

Y. M.

Hummm, ‘o (1) cuddiruni

That’s cuddiruni.

Livia

Cosa?

What?

Y. M.

 

 

 

‘O cuddiruni.

È una focaccia tipica

ripiena di pomodoro, patate,

acciughe, pecorino, origano

[O cuddiruni is a typical focaccia…]

Cuddiruni

is a kind of focaccia

filled with tomatoes, potatoes,

anchovies, pecorino, oregano

YM/FC

 

Y. M.

Qui ci stava Peppino

che vendeva pane e (2) panelle

That’s where Peppino used to sell

bread and panelle.

YM/A

Fazio

 

 (3) Omo piccin, tutto belin.

[Short man, with a long penis]

 “Omo piccin, tutto bellin.”

Table 3. Retention samples

Examples of Direct translation of dialect words are shown in the excerpts below in the case of an ECR (4), Sicilian lexicon (5) and a simile (6) subtitled using the closest possible equivalent.

YM/A

Lady

(4) Vircoche?

Apricots?

YM/MW

Y. M.

 

E’ grande e grosso ma pare  (5) nu picciriddu

[He is big and large but he is like a kid.]

He’s a big boy, but he’s like a kid.

 

YM/MW

Gegé

(6) Bedda como il sole (…)

Beautiful like the sun (…)

Table 4. Direct translation samples

In M’s first episode, (7), the word is translated through specification, whereas in the previous example, coming from the prequel, it was retained (2), possibly because of the higher dialect occurrences of the prequel that encouraged foreignizing choices in translation. In (8), explicitation of the marked meaning of the dialectal word cammurrìa is compensated for by a metaphorical addition in the subtitles, and, in (9), the culturally embedded meaning of the Sicilian idiom ‘o carbone vagnato è chisto, resorts to specification with the metaphorical unit in the target language.

M/ST

 

M.

Tu puoi andare a vendere pane e (7) panelle

[You can go and sell bread and panelle.]

You’ll be selling Ø chicpea patties

YM/MW

Fazio

 

(8) Cammurrìa da medici.

[Nuisance from doctors]

The doctors are a pain.

YM/FC

Y. M.

(9) O carbone vagnato è chisto, ah?

[This is wet coal, isn’t it?]

Have you got a guilty conscience?

Table 5. Specification samples

In (10), the ECR sfincione, a particular type of focaccia made in Palermo, is an example of generalization, as it becomes pizza. The dialectal lexeme nipotuzzo (11) is an affectionate form obtained by adding the Sicilian diminutive suffix –uzzo attached to the Italian root nipote/nephew. In (12), the simile uttered in dialect and the reformulation of the original dialogue to increase the strength of the utterance is condensed and made more general through the metaphor and hyperbole in the subtitle.

M/ET

Old man

 

Su mughiere c’aveva preparato uno (10) sfincione per primo.

[His wife had made sfincione as first course]

His wife had made pizza for us Ø.

M/ET

Man

Japichinu, il mio  (11) nipotuzzo.

Ø My nephew.

YM/FC

Cat

(12) È muta come nu pesce. Nu vole parlare cu nisciuno.

[She is dumb like a fish. She doesn’t want to talk to anyone]

She won’t say a word to anyone.

Table 6. Generalization samples

In (13), the substitution of the ECR camorristi with mafiosi performs a radical socio-cultural shift in connotation between the two criminal organizations of the Camorra and the Mafia, whose geographical origins are respectively in Campania and Sicily, triggering completely different mental associations in the Italian audience. Mimì is reporting to Montalbano a comment made by their superior who generally turns a blind eye to crime, personifying the despicable attitude of some Italian institutions. The use of camorristi adds communicative force to the offensive charge in the original dialogue. The substitution with mafiosi holds a different socio-cultural connotation but becomes more easily recognizable as stereotypically associated to Sicily for a foreign audience, precluding however a deeper understanding of Italian society and culture. In (14), there is a play on the linguistic ambiguity of the old-fashioned, dialectal lexeme osso pizziddu/pointy bone, therefore Montalbano asks for clarification. The substitution with walnut bone reproduces in the audience an equivalent effect of lack of clarity and of suggesting the shape of the bone, although the semantic association to the malleolus is lost. In this case, retention of the Sicilian lexeme could have been justified by the intradiegetic explanation of the following scenes. Moreover, the humorous effect of this particular scene is generated by repetition (15) that is omitted in the subtitles. In the dialectal sentence (16), although the plural form of the reflexive verb is already explicit, the set phrase tutte roie remarks the fact that both the people fell asleep, whereas, in the subtitle the subject becomes singular and the meaning changes.

M/ET

Mimì

Ha detto che era ora che

questa banda (13) de camorristi

che era il nostro commissariato (…)

[He said it was time that this gang of camorristi which is our station (…)]

He said he was pleased

That this gang of mafiosi,

Meaning our station (…)

 

YM/MW

Y. M.

(14) L’osso pizziddu?

(15) Unne ha l’osso pizziddu?

[The pointy bone?

Where’s the pointy bone?]

Ø

Where’s the walnut bone?

M/ET

Lady

 

(16) Ce addormiscemo tutte roie.

[We fell asleep the two of us.]

He slept all the way home.

Table 7. Substitution samples

The following excerpts present examples of total omission. In (17), there is deletion of the Sicilian proper name and culturally connoted form of address in an inverted position in comparison to the standard word order. In (18), the omission of the Sicilian word criata and of the emphatically left dislocated object affects coherence of the subtitle and tones it down, as the deictic pronoun holds no immediate reference and word order is also standardised. In (19), the frequently used dialectal metaphorical image referring to the dominion of the basic literacy skills is omitted.

M/ET

M.

 

(17) Calogero carissimo, che cosa abbiamo di buono oggi?

[Calogero dearest, what do we have that is good today?]

Ø What do you recommend today?

YM/FC

Fazio

 

Mia moglie di (18) criate in casa non ne vuole sentire parlare.

[My wife of maids in the house doesn’t want to hear talking about]

My wife won’t hear of it. Ø

YM/A

Mimì

Guarda io, (19) per non sapere ne leggere ne scrivere, ora vado subito dal PM

[Look, although I can neither read nor write, I am going immediately to the Public Prosecutor]

Ø I’ll go and ask

The public prosecutor.

Table 8. Omission samples

Moreover, the presence of idiomaticity and culturally embedded set phrases as an important connotative feature of dialect may encourage the subtitler to employ compensation strategies, inserting idiomaticity in cases when this is not present in the source dialogue. Such cases have been included in the quantitative data as samples of substitution, although the dialectal sentence in the source dialogue does not really appear as a strong phraseological unit. In (20), the plain dialectal phrase is translated metaphorically and, in (21), the embedded dialectal sentence of the ST, which has no particular idiomatic strength, is translated with an idiom in the TT, through substitution and compensation. The subtitler changes the meaning of the source language moving from an expression of loneliness to one of extreme poverty supported by intersemiotic coherence to the image on screen, showing the old man living in a shed.

M/TH

Girl

 

(20) Nun me potto catamiare.

[I couldn’t move]

I was scared to death.

 

YM/MW

Old man

 

 (21) No aio a nuddu che me dona audienzia

[I don’t have anybody listening to me]

I don’t have

two pennies to rub together…

 

Table 9. Substitution/compensation samples

The longer dialogue reported in Table 10 provides a visual representation of the amount of code-switching in the ST, offering proof that, in the prequel, Montalbano uses dialect more freely and extensively when emotionally involved. It also suggests a number of comments on recurring syntactical and structural features of dialect that are usually omitted or normalised in the subtitles and will be used for a qualitative analysis. The over-inquisitive tone of the theatrical exchange between the housekeeper Adelina and Montalbano plays on the stereotypical obsession of southern Italian women for pasta and home-cooking. Busiate di pasta is a Sicilian type of fresh pasta from Trapani and it is traditionally served with a local variety of pesto. Therefore, finding them in Montalbano’s fridge implies that the inspector is going to eat something that was not homemade by Adelina, who takes it as a personal offence. In line (22), the subtitle offers a generalization losing the original connotation and an opportunity for retention of a dialectal word, whose meaning is clarified by the image of busiate on screen. The amount of code-switching between standard Italian and Sicilian lexicon and syntax used by the emotionally involved interlocutors is represented by the words in bold. In spite of the aggressive sounding tone, the dialogue maintains a formal register that represents the respectful distance, mandatory between people of different ages and class, increasing the humorous effect of the exchange. The scene starts with the frequently repeated title dottore, used in Southern dialects as a connotative epithet of respect for professional people, that is generalised in the subtitle. The differentiation between forms of address in Southern dialects and standard Italian, as a key sign of respect, is exemplified by Adelina’s dialectal use of the second person plural pronoun vossìa in lines (24) and (28) in comparison to Montalbano’s answers in formal Italian using the third person singular senta in line (30). They are both standardised in translation. Moreover, the prosodic feature of intonation conveyed by the use of the question tag eh?, in line (25), is omitted, whereas, in line (30), the marker of intonation va bene? is generalised and domesticated. Examples of dialectal syntax are present in the use of the past tenses trovai (line 22), nacqui (line 23), so scurdò (line 31) instead of the present perfect tense ho trovato, sono nato, si è scordato and in the forward shift of the verbs in lines (28) and (32). As stressed by Gutt (1991: 151, quoted in Leppihalme 1997: 53), proverbs ‘express popular insights’ and in case in which they do not get recognized as proverbs they may well lose their communicative force in translation. As we said, the use of proverbs, idiomatic expressions, clichés is a frequent trait of dialect. The dialogue shows examples of omission of phraseological units that reinforce emotional tension like mancu morta (line 29) and the interjection talea a chista in line (35). The substitutions of the regional proverbs impincimento porta giovamento (line 33) and of the metaphorical expression cose da n’escere pazzo proprio (line 36) maintain functional equivalence in translation.

(22) Dottore! Nel frigo ci trovai queste

busiate di pasta.

(23) E siccome che non nacqui aieri.

(24) Vossìa se le vuole sbafare

(25) con il pesto alla trapanese, eh?

[Sir, I found these busiate of pasta in the fridge and since I wasn’t born yesterday you want to eat them with Trapani-style pesto, don’t you?]

Sir, I found this pasta in the fridge.

 

I wasn’t born yesterday.

You were going to eat it

With Trapani-style pesto Ø.

(26) Da quando in qua mi si mette a perquisire magari il frigorifero?

(27) E poi a mìa, ‘o pesto me piace assai.

[How long have you started also searching my fridge?And then, I love pesto very much]

Ø Are you searching my fridge now?

 

Anyway, I love pesto.

(28) Peggio pevossìa. Io persona seria sono

(29) Né lo faccio, né manco mo mangiasse, mancu morta il pesto.

[It serves you right. I am a serious person.

I don’t do it and I wouldn’t eat pesto, not even if I was dead]

Too bad for you! I do things properly

And I’ll never make pesto or eat it. Ø

 

(30) Senta io le busiate me le sbafo come meglio credo, va bene?

(31) E poi tanto Dindò ‘o pesto so scurdò

[Can you listen? I am eating busiate as I hink it is better, all right? Anyway, Dindò forgot the pesto]

Look, I eat pasta how I want, OK?

Dindò forgot the pesto anyway.

(32) Meglio è.

(33) Impincimento porta giovamento

(34) Ce le faccio col sugo mio,

che pure meglio de chiddautro è

[It is better. Obstacles bring benefit. I’ll cook it to you with my sauce, that is better than the other].

Good.

Every cloud has a silver lining.

I’ll cook it with Ø sauce.

It’s much better than that stuff.

(35) Ma talea a chista!

(36) Cose da n’escere pazze proprio.

[But look at her! Things to go mad]

Ø

It’s enough to drive you crazy.

Table 10. From YM/MW – Busiate di pasta

When talking about translation and intercultural communication, Katan adopts Hall’s (1990 quoted by Katan 2014) triadic image of culture as icebergs, where the lexical level of ECRs still belongs to the tip of the iceberg, being a ‘technical level’ where the translation dilemmas are visible. What is less evident and, therefore, subtler is to be found under the surface where ‘the issue is no longer that of technical explanation of a different term, but that of explaining different sets of behaviours and culture-bound practices’ (Katan 2014: 61). At this level, register alteration often brings about a different perception of characters and of the context of situation. In the dialogue between Adelina and Montalbano, besides linguistic formal distance that is not conveyed in the subtitle, dialect code-switching conveys a sense of caring affection between the interlocutors: therefore, Montalbano’s first reply da quando in quando si mette a perquisire magari il frigorifero (line 26) sounds milder and less aggressive than the subtitle. Also in line (34) ce lo faccio col sugo mio is left with no personal reference, through the omission of the personal pronoun and the possessive adjective. Normalization in subtitling may reproduce misperceptions in the target audience, guided by unconscious sets of beliefs and behaviours, intensifying ‘already well–inculcated stereotypes regarding Italians.’ (Katan 2014: 62). The interpersonal dimension and the speakers’ intentions embedded at the linguistic level, once sanitized, will find barely enough elements in the interplay of the other semiotic channels to be grasped by the audience.

5. Results

Table 11 shows a summary of the total occurrences of culturally-embedded language in the corpus used for the quantitative analysis. The categories include ECRs, dialectal lexical items and set phrases considered in the seven episodes. In the data, occurrences of ECRs are higher, compared to Sicilian lexical items and set phrases, and include mainly regional terminology, that is culture-bound Italianized words, rather than specific dialectal lexicon, only present in the domain of food. ECR occurrences are subtitled through Retention, therefore maintaining maximum fidelity to the source language, but also through Generalization and Omission, whose percentages are quite significant. At the linguistic level, where the ST presents frequent code-switching into dialect, lexical items are mainly domesticated, whereas set phrases undergo a more moderate form of domestication with high percentages of Specification that at sentence level includes processes of Explicitation, Addition and Reformulation in order to reach functional equivalence. Moreover, the use of substitution includes a few interesting cases of Compensation where the communicative connotation of idiomaticity is inserted in the translation of dialectal phrases with no particular idiomatic strength, in order to counterbalance the toning down of previous cases. Therefore, Substitution and Compensation become important strategies for the purpose of communicating the source text intentions.

 

 

Foreignizing

Domesticating

 

 

maximum

high

moderate

low

missing

Episodes

 

Total

Retention

Literal translation

Specification

Generalization

Substitution

Omission

M/ST

 

 

 

 

ECRs

178

64

35.9%

15

8.4%

4

2.2%

30

16.8%

26

14.6%

39

21.9%

M/ET

208

69

33.1%

12

5.7%

-

-

48

23%

33

15.8%

46

22.1%

M/AF

159

45

28.3%

6

3.7%

4

2.5%

44

27.6%

29

18.2%

31

19.4%

M/TH

101

22

21.7%

5

4.9%

2

1.9%

39

38.6%

16

15.8%

17

16.8%

YM/FC

196

46

23.4%

11

5.5%

10

15.1%

54

27.5%

37

18.8%

38

19.3%

YM/MW

178

38

21.3%

26

14.6%

1

0.5%

49

27.5%

35

19.6%

29

16.2%

YM/A

154

43

27.9%

28

18.1%

9

5.8%

11

7.1%

24

15.5%

39

25.3%

M/ST

 

 

 

Lexical items

42

-

-

4

9.5%

4

9.5%

26

61.9%

2

4.7%

6

14.2%

M/ET

68

-

-

2

12.9%

11

16.1%

38

55.8%

3

4.4%

14

20.5%

M/AF

43

-

-

-

-

3

6.9%

30

69.7%

2

4.6%

8

18.6%

M/TH

49

-

-

-

-

4

8.1%

37

75.5%

-

-

8

16.3%

YM/FC

54

-

-

-

-

-

-

33

61.1%

-

-

21

38.9%

YM/MW

114

-

-

1

0.8%

25

21.9%

58

50.8%

3

2.6%

27

23.6%

YM/A

49

-

-

3

6.1%

5

10.2%

22

44.8%

4

8.1%

15

30.6%

M/ST

 

 

 

Set phrases

 

 

16

-

-

1

6.2%

10

62.5%

3

18.7%

1

6.2%

1

6.2%

M/ET

17

-

-

-

-

4

23.5%

6

35.2%

4

23.5%

3

17.6%

M/AF

10

-

-

-

-

3

30%

5

50%

-

-

2

20%

M/TH

22

-

-

3

12.6%

6

27.4%

11

50%

1

4.5%

1

4.5%

YM/FC

17

-

-

-

-

3

17.6%

12

70.5%

-

-

2

11.7%

YM/MW

38

-

-

5

13.1%

16

42.1%

10

26.3%

1

2.6%

6

15.7%

YM/A

14

1

7.1%

1

7.1%

3

21.4%

6

42.8%

1

7.1%

2

14.2%

Table 11. Summarizing table of subtitling strategies

The ECR domains are listed in table 12. Professional titles stand out with the highest number of entries, due to the common trait of title repetition in regional language. However, since their use is culturally embedded, these are mainly subtitled through the domesticating strategies of Generalization, Substitution and Omission. On the other hand, foreignizing strategies are mainly used in the domains of brand names, geographical and personal names and in the case of words related to food, where, besides the internationally recognized nouns of pasta and pizza, we also find frequent retention of regional words like cuddiruni, caponata, cassatelle, arancini, and so on.

 

Foreignizing

Domesticating

 

maximum

high

moderate

low

missing

ECRs (1,172)

Retention

Literal translation

Specification

Generalization

Substitution

Omission

Personal

names (59)

41

 

69.4%

9

15.2%

3

5.5%

1

1.6%

1

1.6%

4

6.7%

Geographical

names  (240)

194

80.8%

16

6.6%

-

-

-

-

1

0.5%

29

12.1%

Institutional

names (53)

6

11.3%

18

33.9%

3

5.7%

6

11.4%

17

32.1%

3

5.6%

 

Brand

names (10)

10

 

100%

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Professional

titles (726)

13

1.7%

57

7.8%

22

3.1%

261

35.9%

176

24.3%

197

27.2%

Food (71)

47

66.2%

6

8.5%

1

1.4%

7

9.8%

4

5.7%

6

8.4%

 

Currency (12)

12

 

100%

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Measurements (1)

-

 

-

-

-

1

100%

-

-

-

-

-

-

Table 12. ECRs’ domains and subtitling strategies

As for the language-specific features of dialect, at the linguistic level, lexical items and set phrases are generally subtitled using domesticating strategies. In particular, Generalization and Omission are the main strategies used for specific dialectal lexemes. As for the level of set phrases, domestication tends to be more moderate considering the lower percentage of Omission. Set phrases are frequently translated through Specification, demonstrating an effort to maintain functional equivalence, where literal correspondence is not possible. However, as the homogenising convention tends to be the general norm (Chiaro 2009), language variation is generally omitted or normalised with loss of code-switching.

 

Foreignizing

Domesticating

 

maximum

high

moderate

low

missing

Language-specific features of dialect

Retention

Literal translation

Specification

Generalization

Substitution

Omission

Lexical items (416)

-

-

10

2.5%

52

12.5%

244

58.6%

14

3.4%

96

23%

 

Set phrases (132)

1

0.7%

 

10

7.5%

45

34%

52

40.1%

7

5.2%

17

12.5%

Table 13. Language-specific domains and subtitling strategies

As suggested by Gottlieb (2009), subtitling from a lesser-known language like Italian into English is considered a case of ‘upstream translation’, in which the language transfer tends to lean more towards domestication into the stronger language. In line with the scholar’s thinking, the cases of retention present in the corpus mainly pertain to the technical level of ECRs and loan words belonging to the domain of food and organized crime, which do not challenge the level of familiarity with the Sicilian culture in the foreign audience. Moreover, omission of the formal register and of the connotative elements that show social distance, produce a shift to an informal tone that confirms the stereotypical images of southern Italian immigrant and of their bare mastery of the English language.

6. Conclusions

Standardization and omission of language variation and code-switching affects characters’ representation with the result of ‘de-emphasising of the sicilianità’ (Kapsaskis and Artegiani 2011: 96) and of the socio-cultural elements of the ST. Therefore, the pursuit of readability remains the norm even in cases when retention of dialectal lexemes would be fostered by intersemiotic support from the visual channel. On the other hand, the presence in the subtitle of a very limited number of ECRs only pertaining to the familiar domains of food and organized crime reinforces the stereotypical traits normally associated with the Sicilian culture. Moving beyond the technical level of language translation, the deletion of specific features of dialect such as repetition and register alteration thoroughly involves what Katan describes as ‘impression management’ (2014: 62) of the foreign audience in intercultural communication, producing a misperception of the emotional impact of characters and of the context in which they act.

Moreover, if we consider the translation strategies used for language variation and code-switching, according to the canonical prism of foreignization and domestication, it can be argued that Retention and Direct translation of regionalism are not necessarily a signal of moving the audience towards the SC but rather they may just force awkwardness in the TT without unravelling the communicative force of the original. Thus, the use of domesticating strategies like Compensation and Adaptation may be more adequate to this purpose. This is to be achieved by the subtitler through the construction of a personal subtext of colloquialisms and irregular syntactical structures, not to be inserted in correspondence to the ones found in the ST but rather when more appropriate to the target language (Cipolla 2006). The balancing act between the two tendencies may add to the construction of intercultural understanding and to the recognition of the role of the translators/subtitlers called to be active ‘agents of change in a culture’ (Cronin 2003: 68) or rather ‘mindful mediators’ (Katan 2014: 66) able to make decisions on what needs to be translated.

References

Alfonzetti, Giovanna M. (1998) “The conversational dimension in code-switching between Italian and Dialect in Sicily” in Code-switching in conversation. Language, interaction and identity, Peter Auer (ed.), London and New York, Routledge: 180-211.

Armstrong, Neil and Federico M. Federici (eds) (2006) Translating Voices, Translating Regions, Roma, Aracne.

Berruto, Gaetano (1987) Sociolinguistica dell’italiano contemporaneo, Roma, Carocci.

Chiaro, Delia (2009) “Issues in Audiovisual Translation” in The Routledge Companion to Translation Studies, Jerome Munday (ed.), Oxford, Routledge: 141-165.

Cipolla, Gaetano (2006) “Translating Andrea Camilleri into English: an Impossible Task?”, Journal of Italian Translation 1, no. 2: 13-23.

Consiglio, Maria C. (2008) “’Montalbano Here’: Problems in translating multilingual novels” in Thinking Translation: Perspectives from Within and Without: Conference Proceedings Third UEA Postgraduate Translation Symposium, Rebecca Hyde Parker and Karla Guadarrama García (eds), Boca Raton, Florida, Brown Walker Press: 47-68.

Cronin, Michael (2003) Translation and Globalization, London, Routledge.

Culperer, Jonathan (2001) Language and Characterisation: People in Plays and Other Texts, London, Longman.

Delabastita Dirk and Rainier Grutman (eds) (2005) Fictionalising translation and multilingualism. Special Issue Of Linguistica Antverpiensia New Series 4, Antwerpen, Hogeschool Antwerpen.

Díaz Cintas, Jorge and Aline Remael (2009) Audiovisual Translation: Subtitling, Manchester, St. Jerome Publishing.

Dore, Margherita (2017) “Subtitling Catarella: Camilleri’s humour Travels to the UK and the USA”, Volume of Proceedings of TRANSLATA II International conference on Translation and Interpreting Studies, Innstruck: 43-51.

---- (2019) “Food and Translation in Montalbano” in Food Across Cultures – Linguistic Insights in Transcultural Tastes, Giuseppe Balirano and Siria Guzzo (eds), Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan: 31-47.

Federici, Federico M. (ed) (2009) Translating Regionalised Voices in Audiovisuals, Roma, Aracne.

---- (2011) Translating Dialects and Languages of Minorities: Challenges and Solutions, Bern, Peter Lang.

Gottlieb, Henrik (1997) Subtitles, Translation & Idioms, Copenhagen, Center for Translation Studies and Lexicography.

---- (2009) “Subtitling against the current: Danish concepts, English minds” in New Trends in Audiovisual Translation, Jorge Díaz Cintas (ed.), Bristol, Multilingual Matters: 21-46.

---- (2012) “Subtitles – Readable dialogue?” in Eye tracking in Audiovisual Translation Elisa Perego (ed.), Roma, Aracne: 37-81.

---- (2014) “Foreign voices, local lines: in defense of visibility and domestication in subtitling” in Subtitling and Intercultural Communication, Beatrice Garzelli and Michele Baldo (eds), Pisa, Edizioni ETS: 27-54.

Gutt, Ernst-August (1991) Translation and Relevance: Cognition and Context, Oxford, Basil Blackwell.

Ivarsson Jan and Mary Caroll (1998) Subtitling, Simirishamn, TransEdit.

Katan, David (2004) Translating Cultures: An Introduction for Translators, Interpreters and Mediators, London and New York, Routledge.

---- (2014) “Intercultural Communication, Mindful Translation and Squeezing ‘Culture’ onto the Screen” in Subtitling and Intercultural Communication, Beatrice Garzelli and Michele Baldo (eds), Pisa, Edizioni ETS: 55-75.

Kapsaskis, Dionysios and Irene Artegiani (2011) “Transformations of Montalbano through Languages and Media: Adapting and Subtitling Dialect in The Terracotta Dog” in Media across Borders: Localising TV, Films and Video Games, Andrea Esser, Iain Robert Smith, and Miguel A. Bernal-Merino (eds), London and New York, Routledge: 85-98.

Leppihalme, Ritva (1997) Culture Bumps. An Empirical Approach to the Translation of Allusions, Clevedon, Multilingual Matters.

---- (2000) “The Two Faces of Standardization: On the Translation of Regionalisms in Literary Dialogue”, The Translator, vol. 6/2: 247-269.

Marrano, M. Giorgio, Giovanni Nadiani and Chris Rundle (eds) (2009)  “The Translation of Dialect in Multimedia”, inTRAlinea Special Issue, http://www.intralinea.org/specials/medialectrans (accessed 29 November 2017).

Nedergaard-Laarsen, Birgit (1993) “Culture-bound problems in subtitling”, Perspectives. Studies in Translatology 1, no. 2: 207-241.

Pedersen, Jan (2005) “How is Culture Rendered in Subtitles?, MuTra – Challenges of Multidimensional Translation: Conference Proceedings: 1-18.

---- (2011) Subtitling Norms for Television, Amsterdam and Philadelphia, John Benjamins Publishing Company.

Perego, Elisa (2003) “Evidence of Explicitation in Subtitling: Towards a Categorization”, Across Languages and Cultures 4, no. 1: 63-88.

Pezzotti, Barbara (2012) The importance of place in contemporary Italian crime fiction: A bloody journey, Plymouth, UK, Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.

Pistelli, Maurizio (2003) Montalbano sono: sulle tracce del più famoso commissario di polizia italiano, Firenze, Le Càriti Editore.

Ranzato, Irene (2010) “Localising Cockney: translating dialect into Italian” in New Insights into Audiovisual Translation and Media Accessibility, Jorge Díaz Cintas, Anna Matamala and Josélia Neves (eds), Amsterdam and New York, Rodopi: 109-122.

Riondino, Michele (2013) The Young Montalbano: Reinterpreting the detective, http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/tv/entries/a9571412-4997-3bfc-adab-d084840e3205 (accessed 29 November 2017).

Sartarelli, Stephen (2004) “L’alterità linguistica di Camilleri in inglese” in Il caso Camilleri: letteratura e storia. Palermo: Sellerio Editore: 213-219.

Sulis, Gigliola (2007) “Un esempio controcorrente di plurilinguismo. Il caso Camilleri” in Les enjeux du plurilinguisme dans la literature italienne: actes du colloque du 11 au 13 may. Cecile Berger, Antonella Capra and Jean Nimis (eds), Toulouse, Collection de l’Ecrit-Université Toulouse: 213-30.

Taffarel, Margherita (2012) “Un’analisi descrittiva della traduzione dei dialoghi dei personaggi di Andrea Camilleri in castigliano” InTRAlinea Special Issue: The translation of Dialects in Multimedia II, Giovanni Nadiani and Chris Rundle (eds), http://www.intralinea.org/specials/medialectrans2 (accessed 29 November 2017).

Tomaiuolo, Saverio (2009) “’I am Montalbano/Montalbano sono’: Fluency and Cultural Difference in Translating Andrea Camilleri’s Fiction”, Journal of Anglo-Italian Studies, 10: 201-219.

Traum, David R. and Peter Heeman (1997) “Utterance Units in Spoken Dialogue” Proceedings ECAI ’96 Workshop on Dialogue Processing in Spoken Language Systems, London, Springer-Verlag: 125-140.

Venuti, Lawrence (1995) The Translator’s Invisibility, London and New York, Routledge.

Notes

[1] Pedersen (2011) uses the term specification to refer to cases in which the ECR remains untranslated and further explanation is added through completion, that is the spelling out of acronyms, or addition through meronymy, polysemy or hyponymy. In this sense, Specification comes before Direct Translation in terms of the degree of fidelity to the ST.

[2] M includes 11 series and 30 episodes running from 1999 until 2017, whereas YM includes 2 series and 12 episodes running from 2012 until 2015.The capitalized initials will be used only in reference to the TV-series, whereas the full name will be used when addressing Montalbano within the text and the abbreviation M. in the tables of excerpts.

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"Subtitling dialect in Inspector Montalbano and Young Montalbano"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2466

Revoicing Otherness and Stereotypes via Dialects and Accents in Disney’s Zootopia and its Italian Dubbed Version

By Margherita Dore (University of Rome "La Sapienza")

Abstract & Keywords

Since the founding of the Walt Disney Company in 1923, animated feature films have been a pillar of the cinema industry, telling fascinating, timeless stories, and appealing to children all over the world. Over the years, however, these tales have undergone significant changes, variously due to sociocultural development, different perceptions of childhood, and above all the economic need to broaden their target audience. Mono-dimensional drawings and fairy tales have evolved into the computer-generated imagery of films, completely modern in their cinematography and narrative approach.

The growing importance and popularity of these movies has also attracted the interest of translation scholars who have turned their attention to the study of audiovisual texts for children and analysed at length the needs of this specific audience and the strategies adopted in dubbed and subtitled versions. As far as translation is concerned, one of the most interesting and challenging aspects of animated movies in general and Disney animated films in particular is the use of linguistic variation to construct the characters, highlight their geographical origins or generate humorous effects. Therefore, this study investigates how foreign accents and diatopic varieties of US English have been employed in the 2017 Academy Award-winning movie Zootopia (Byron Howard and Rich Moore, 2016) and dealt with by the Italian dubbing team during its translation. As the analysis demonstrates, some of the translation choices adopted for the Italian target text (i.e. using local dialects and accents) seem to foster stereotypes regarding the receiving culture and its social stratification, thus subverting in part the ST’s original moral message of inclusion and mutual tolerance.

Keywords: dubbing, otherness, Zootopia, stereopyes, diatects, accents, animated films

©inTRAlinea & Margherita Dore (2019).
"Revoicing Otherness and Stereotypes via Dialects and Accents in Disney’s Zootopia and its Italian Dubbed Version"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2465

1. Introduction

The twenty-first century has witnessed a continuation in the so-called ‘Disney Renaissance’ of the 1990s (Booker 2010: 37), which paved the way for a series of animated films that, while maintaining the narrative formula rooted in magic and fairy tales, were more mature than their predecessors in terms of content, references and humour. The turning point of the animation genre could be related to changing cultural perceptions of childhood (i.e. what children can or should understand), and therefore seen as a natural response to the evolution of the Western child and their ‘loss of innocence’ (ibid. 6, and passim). Put more simply, since nowadays children grow up faster, they can be exposed to more complex elements in animation. In more practical terms, however, this development was most probably a simple response to the commercial need for a broader audience after a period of creative stagnation and low box office sales (ibid. 40). Nonetheless, since then animation has been more directly addressed to children and their parents, thus creating audiovisual texts that operate on different layers of meaning and, in some cases, may even be defined as ‘ambivalent texts’ (Shavit 1986: 63-92). In other words, they can be interpreted by a child in a literal sense, but also read in a more sophisticated and satirical key by adults (some noteworthy examples are literary works like Gulliver’s Travels and Alice in Wonderland, but also more recent films such as Aladdin; cf. O’Connell 2003).

Critically acclaimed for delivering a positive message of acceptance and tolerance and for telling a story that both kids and adults can emotionally invest in, Zootopia (Byron Howard and Rich Moore, 2016) is a computer-animated comedy-adventure produced and distributed by Walt Disney Animation Studios. In a nutshell, the story is set in a modern mammal metropolis called Zootopia, a fantastic city inhabited by English-speaking animals who wear clothes, listen to mp3 music, own computers and smartphones, use the latest apps and take selfies. The most relevant fact regarding Zootopia is that it is a place where both predators (e.g. lions, cheetahs, foxes etc.) and prey (e.g. bunnies, shrews and so on) live in harmony and where ‘anyone can be anything’. The film features a heroine, Judy Hopps[1] (voiced by Ginnifer Goodwin) who is in stark contrast with the Disney princesses of the past (cf. Streib at al. 2016 and their analysis of female characters in 36 mostly animated movies, which were ‘G-rated’ because suitable to be seen by children). Judy is the first bunny (rabbit) to join the city police force and, despite all prejudices, she solves a mysterious case (several preys have suddenly disappeared leaving no trace) with the help of a fox and con artist Nick Wilde (voiced by Jason Bateman), thus proving that things are never what they seem. Most importantly, the film has a complex, dynamic plot and adult themes that carefully construct a metaphorical subtext mirroring our society and its contradictions. For instance, Judy soon discovers that life in Zootopia is not as utopic as she thought. Since prey make up 90% of the population, there are prejudices and discrimination against the predator minorities, which are considered genetically prone to revert back to their primal instincts. This predator/prey dichotomy is the most important allegory in the film and has been used to broadly tackle contemporary issues such as racism and prejudice. Although the anthropomorphic animals may not be identified as belonging to any particular ethnic group, discriminatory references are made that range from forms of nativism and chauvinism to the general stereotyping of behaviour aimed at forcing the characters into meeting certain social expectations. Throughout the movie, stereotypes and biases are challenged and eventually defied.   

Considering the context Zootopia strives to depict (i.e. one of mammals coming from virtually any part of the world), the audience does not need accents to be reminded of Zootopia’s multi-ethnic nature, although this has been found to be the main function of linguistic variation in Disney animated films (Lippi-Green 2012: 115). Nonetheless, the film does employ a wide set of foreign accents and diatopic varieties of US English in order to construct the characters, highlight the animals’ geographical origins or generate humorous effects. Whereas the protagonists Judy and Nick speak Standard American English, Gideon and Judy’s parents (Bonnie Hunt and Don Lake), who live in the rural neighbourhood of Bunnyburrow, have a slight southern accent; Duke Weaselton (Alan Tudyk) speaks New York City English; Mr. Big (Maurice LaMarche) and his daughter Fru Fru (Leah Latham) have an Italian mobster accent; Chief Bogo (an African buffalo dubbed by Idris Elba) has a East London accent that occasionally includes a South African accent; the Asian elephant Nangi (Gita Reddy) has an Indian accent.

Since the transposition of the linguistic varieties is worthy of special attention, in this study I examine the Source Text (ST) against its Italian dubbed version, or Target Text (TT), to verify what type of strategies and approaches were adopted to tackle this specific issue. Before proceeding, it seems also worth mentioning that the Italian TT follows the Disney tradition of assigning most of the characters’ voices to local celebrities to achieve immediate recognition and a sense of familiarity: actors Massimo Lopez (Mayor Lionheart), Diego Abatantuono (Finnick) and Tuscan TV host Paolo Ruffini (Yax) are just some of the cast members. As the analysis below demonstrates, choosing to revoice some characters by means of local actors and dubbers sporting specific accents has led to some criticism (i.e. mischievous Duke Weaselton is dubbed by Italian actor and comic Frank Matano using a heavy Neapolitan accent and some overt use of dialect). Consequently, the Italian TT appears to foster stereotypes regarding the receiving culture (Dore 2009), its social stratification and in particular ‘the Otherness of the South’ (Iaia 2015), thus in part subverting the ST’s original moral message of inclusion and mutual tolerance.

2. Otherness and Language Variation in Animated Films

In order to properly understand the process of dubbing in recently released animated films, it is necessary to underline how animation has evolved over time in terms of storytelling, audience and ideology. As mentioned earlier, Booker (2010: 6 and passim) argues that developments in animated films may be the result of changes in modern children or rather, of their ‘loss of innocence’ in comparison with the past. New formulas have also been adopted by non-Disney companies, like Pixar Animation Studios or DreamWorks Animation, which have been even braver in their challenges to tradition. An example that is worth mentioning is Pixar’s Toy Story (John Lasseter, 1995), which was the first feature-length computer-animated film and also the first children’s movie to include explicit adult themes and references.

If having a dual audience is by now a fundamental feature of animation, the specific target of children cannot be neglected, together with its educational value. Thanks to the technological boom, nowadays animated films can be easily purchased and watched over and over again, so that the messages and morals transmitted become deeply ingrained especially in the minds of very young children. Drawing on Nielson Company report (2009)[2], Lippi-Green (2012: 102) explains that, for instance, US children aged 2-5 watch more than 32 hours of television per week, while the 6–11-year-olds watch slightly less. In particular, the effect of animation on children’s view of ‘otherness’ has become a popular topic of concern, seeing that Disney producers have made it their habit to set their stories in faraway lands (both in time and space); and in many instances their representation of the Other – visually, acoustically, and in a narrative sense – is somewhat problematic. Di Giovanni (2007) has highlighted the rather asymmetrical relationship that has formed between the narrating and the narrated culture in the Disney movies of the 1990s. In her opinion, cultural otherness remains paradoxically in the background, being referenced only in the form of global stereotypes and metonymies mainly created by the Western world. Meanwhile, American culture and ideology gain the upper hand, as they are projected in the depiction of Others in order to anchor the story to a familiar reality and prevent younger viewers from feeling a sense of strangeness or confusion. Therefore, the elements adopted to reference Otherness and/or establish a foreign environment are those commonly used in the West as symbols of these foreign cultures. For instance, food references are particularly common: visual and verbal references to the baguette are almost a must to construct a French socio-cultural context (ibid. 211). Other strategies include the modification of familiar idioms or exclamations to fit the culture portrayed (e.g. in Aladdin the line ‘Hold on to your turban!’ plays on the more straightforward ‘hold on tight’) and the random addition of elements and expressions belonging to contemporary Western civilisation (e.g. in the case of the ancient Greek protagonist of Hercules (Tate Donovan, 1997) by using colloquial expressions such as ‘How you boys doing?’; ibid. 213).

It is also useful to remember that Americanisation strategies are a part of a bigger picture. Disney is accustomed to depicting Otherness because its movies are often based on non-American tales (Charles Perrault, the Brothers Grimm, Carlo Collodi, Hans Christian Andersen are just some of their sources). This also means that, in order to appropriate cultural icons and claim authorial rights (and allow the subsequent production of gadgets, toys, accessories and merchandising), some significant changes are bound to be made: that is the reason why in One Thousand and One Nights Aladino becomes Aladdin (Ron Clements, 1992), property of Disney and therefore untranslatable (Zabalbeascoa 2000: 25).

However, what really stands out in the portrayal of Otherness in animated movies is the use of linguistic variation, which contributes fundamentally to the construction of ‘exotic’ stereotypes. Lippi-Green’s (2012: 101-29) study of a corpus of 24 full-length animated Disney films has shed light on the linguistic patterns that emerge from the comparison of settings and characters. Her findings show that most Disney characters speak Standard American English (SAE), with the general exception of movies set in places like France and Italy: in that case, some of the secondary characters speak with a foreign accent to remind the audience of the setting and create an ‘exotic’ feeling. Most interestingly, about 40 per cent of these characters are portrayed as evil. Aladdin provides a blatant example, with the Arabic protagonists looking and talking like Americans and all the evil Arabic characters portrayed with darker skin and heavy accents (ibid. 107). Even when they are not overt villains, non-SAE speakers are almost always simplified into stereotypes that prove to be limiting and problematic: for instance, African American speakers are often depicted as negative characters (like Louie in The Jungle Book or the crows in Dumbo) and Native Americans as savage and uncivilised (Peter Pan, Pocahontas; ibid. 118-119). Linguistic variation certainly poses a problem when transferring animated films across language and culture, especially in a country like Italy where accents and dialects bring about positive and negative connotations regarding its social stratification.

3. Dubbing Animated Films (in Italy)

Even in subtitling countries, audiovisual texts for children (from animated movies to TV cartoon series) are (almost) always dubbed given that they need to guarantee entertainment and comprehension for kids who cannot read or still do not read fast enough to keep up with subtitles (Chaume 2012: 6-10). The strategies and procedures chosen by translators are influenced by many factors beyond the technical issues of dubbing. For instance, problems arise when considering the needs of such a specific and composite audience; also, the different functions (mainly pedagogical and humorous) performed by this type of text pose many challenges to their transfer across language and culture. Therefore, dubbers have had to figure out new solutions to deal with new kinds of content and issues. In turn, many scholars have investigated the strategies employed to tackle language variation and accents in dubbed and subtitled versions of animated movies (Zabalbeascoa 2000, Di Giovanni 2003, 2007, Bruti 2009, Leonardi 2008, Minutella 2016). As far as dubbed Italian versions are concerned, these linguistic features have mostly been erased: standard language is used for all characters, especially when it comes to translating American accents and dialects, whose connotations are certainly tricky to convey through localised varieties.

It has long been remarked that dubbing in general, and Italian dubbing in particular, is characterised by standardisation and normalisation to ease the comprehension of the target audience. The term ‘doppiaggese’ (in English dubbese; cf. Pavesi and Perego 2006, Romero Fresco 2006), which is loaded with negative undertones, has consequently been used to evoke the artificial, clichéd way of speaking found in dubbed films. It could be argued that, in the case of animated films, using normalising strategies may have positive effects, as they usually lead to the omission of racist stereotypes and prejudices. For example, in the Italian version of Aladdin there are no differences between the language of the protagonists and that of the villains, which consequently eliminates the original, implicit notion that people with an Arabic accent should not be trusted (Leonardi 2008: 169; cf. Zabalbeascoa 2000: 28 for similar considerations regarding the Spanish dubbed version). Nonetheless, these strategies may also pose problems, as linguistic variation is generally part of characterisation, providing important clues on the place of origin, social background or personality of the main characters (Hodson 2014: 5-6), and therefore may need to be kept or transposed in some way. Echoing Camuzio (1993, quoted in La Polla 1994), La Polla has proposed the use of ‘doppiaggio creativo’ (creative dubbing), which entails the introduction into the TT of Italian accent inflections (usually relating to southern dialects) or other elements that are familiar to the target audience. For instance, one example may be found in Thomas O’Malley from Disney’s The Aristocats (Wolfgang Reitherman, 1970) (together with Jock from Lady and The Tramp) as he is a male hero who speaks a socially marked variety of US English rather than the ordinary SAE. The Italian version, which has been critically acclaimed and remains a masterpiece of Italian dubbing, manages to domesticate the original variety in a way that maintains the protagonist’s characterisation and makes him extremely appealing to the audience: O’Malley becomes Romeo, ‘er mejo der Colosseo’ (the best in the Colosseum), and speaks a funny Roman dialect which replaces the original Irish, maintaining the sociolinguistic associations that portray him as a friendly, laid-back alley cat who is at home anywhere, thus making him easy to relate to and memorable for the target audience (Bruti 2009). Similarly, Minutella (2016) shows how a host of regional Northern and Southern accents and dialects have been used to dub language varieties in Gnomeo and Juliet (Kelly Asbury, 2011). Raffaelli (1994: 285) has pointed out that the use of creative dubbing is not limited to animated films as it can be found in light-hearted productions such as Many Rivers to Cross (1956, Roy Rowland, Un napoletano nel Far West) as well as more ‘serious’ ones like Trash (1970, Paul Morrisey, Trash. I rifiuti di New York). Ferrari (2006) argued that creative dubbing can contribute to the success of the film or programme at the local level, as demonstrated in her analysis of the dubbing of the TV series The Nanny (Fran Drescher, 1993-1999, La Tata). Elsewhere, I have examined the application of creative dubbing in The Simpsons (1987- , Matt Groening), concluding that localising the original varieties into the dialects and languages of the target culture can be justified if it helps to maintain the humour and atmosphere of the ST (Dore 2009: 153). Nonetheless, it is important to note that in all the examples reported above creative dubbing seems to serve humour-related or characterising purposes; no negative connotations are directly or indirectly implied, as some cases reported below also show. Conversely, when translation choices aiming to represent Otherness also contribute to fostering stereotypes regarding the receiving culture and its social stratification, then it may be said that the means does not justify the end (i.e. entertaining the audience); part of the following analysis demonstrates how this happens.

4. Data Analysis

The 2017 Academy Award winning Walt Disney Zootopia was released and distributed in the US and worldwide in 2016. The title Zootopia is a compound word stemmed from the union of ‘zoo’, in reference to the animal population, and ‘utopia’, designing both the fantasy environment and the perpetuated illusion about the welcoming, open-minded nature of the city. For its UK release, this animated movie was renamed Zootropolis, and the title has been kept in several European countries, including Italy. The title derives from the words ‘zoo’ and ‘metropolis’, merely creating a reference to a large city or conurbation inhabited by animals. The change is subtle, but Zootropolis sounds more appropriate for an international audience (since non-US speakers pronounce ‘zoo’ and ‘utopia’ differently than Americans), despite losing the foreshadowing in the original title. A spokesperson for Disney also explained that: ‘In the UK we decided to change the US title to Zootropolis to merely allow the film to have a unique title that works for UK audiences’ (Lee 2016). However, another reason for this change was that in Europe the name Zootopia has already been adopted by many pre-existent brands (from a large-scale zoo in Denmark to a CD of children’s songs in England; ibid.). Therefore, the title change has helped avoid the risk of conflicting trademarks. Zootopia is set in a civilised fantasy world where humans have never existed, and animals have evolved and taken their place, becoming an allegory of our reality, including the flaws and attitudes that characterise our society. From this setting, a plot unfolds that entertains children while also developing an original subtext. As mentioned earlier, Zootopia’s protagonist Judy Hopps is a strong police officer nowhere near the prototype of the classic Disney princesses. Most importantly, she is an active heroine who manages to get acknowledged for her intelligence and hard work by trying over and over again until she eventually succeeds. However, she is also deeply flawed, and past experiences have instilled in her a latent mistrust of predators that occasionally emerges with Nick the fox. Eventually, Nick proves his worth to the world and becomes Judy’s best friend and colleague.

That said, and despite its positive message against stereotypes and linguistic profiling, Zootopia is not significantly innovative when compared to the classical stereotypes that Disney movies generally attach to their portrayal of dialects and foreign languages. In the analysis that follows, I will first examine how the cultural representation of Otherness in Zootopia is conveyed on the basis of stereotyped behaviours and attitudes. I will then go on to consider how stereotyping is fostered through linguistic variation and how it has been tackled in translation. By considering the Italian dubbed version, I will show some examples of localisation (e.g. the transposition of American varieties into Italian dialects) that are undoubtedly funny and creative but run the risk of enhancing negative stereotypes related to the target culture.

4.1. Stereotyping and Prejudice

The general attempt to subvert stereotypes in Zootopia is achieved by using characters that visually defy expectations. For instance, sergeant Benjamin Clawhauser (voiced by Nate Torrence) plays against the stereotype of the slender, fast cheetah, as he is so big and slow he cannot even catch an otter (‘I tried to stop her, she’s super slippery! … I gotta go sit down’). However, all the characters are subject to some form of bias and have to face different kinds of injustice, starting with the protagonists. Judy is underestimated and bullied solely because she is a bunny, which classifies her as ‘cute’ (see example (1) below), ‘weak’, and generally not suitable for a job in the police department. When she was little, she was harassed and beaten by a fox who called her ‘a stupid, carrot-farming, dumb bunny’. It is only thanks to her determination and strength that she managed to turn things around, becoming the first bunny police officer. Yet, her achievements do not protect her from prejudice as Chief Bogo clearly biased against her, assigns her to parking duty despite her attempts to show him she is ‘not some token bunny’. Example (1) below offers an extremely fitting description of Zootopian society and its contradictions. In this scene, Judy has just arrived at the Zootopia Police Department Headquarters and meets Clawhauser at the front desk for the first time:

ST

TT

Gloss

CLAWHAUSER: I gotta tell ya, you are even cuter than I thought you’d be.

E devo dire che sei più tenera di quanto pensassi.

 

I must say you’re more tender than I thought you’d be.

JUDY: Oh, ah. You probably didn’t know … but a bunny can call another bunny ‘cute’ … but when other animals do it … it’s a little …

Oh, ah. Forse non lo sai … ma se un coniglio dice a un altro coniglio ‘tenero’ va bene, ma se a dirlo è un altro animale è un po’…

Oh, ah maybe you don’t know but if a bunny calls another bunny ‘tender’ is OK, but if another animal says it, it’s a bit…

CLAWHAUSER: I am so sorry. Me, Benjamin Clawhauser, the guy everyone thinks is just a flabby, donut-loving cop, stereotyping you...?

Mi dispiace tanto. Mi chiamo Benjamin Clawhauser, colui che per tutti è solo un grasso poliziotto patito di ciambelle che fa brutte figure

I am so sorry. My name’s Benjamin Clawhauser, and everybody thinks I’m just a fatty donut-loving cop who commits embarrassing 

gaffes… 

Example 1

As hinted at earlier, Zootopia’s main allegory relies on the prey/predator contrast, which could be identified with the white/black racial dichotomy. Yet, such a dichotomy is imperfect, and any race could be identified with the characters, as this example shows. However, since the producers’ aim was not to tackle one single issue, but to send a universal message about preconceived notions and discrimination, these fallacies may be overlooked. From a linguistic point of view, the word ‘cute’ recalls ‘nigger’ along with its different connotations, as Judy’s embarrassed reaction demonstrates. This offensive term used to refer to a black person is often used self-referentially by African Americans in a neutral and familiar way. Although Italian culture is rapidly opening up to other cultures and becoming multi-ethnic, the reference implied in the ST may only be partly understood as Italy does not have a deeply rooted African community that struggled against slavery for centuries. Nonetheless, the Italian translation of ‘cute’ as ‘tenero’ conveys the double meaning that still bears an important message of tolerance. It implies a notion of sweetness and cuteness if used figuratively, but it is also often applied to food with the meaning of ‘easy to chew’, which explains a bunny’s dismay at being called that by a cheetah. Clawhouser’s immediate apology includes a self-deprecating comment on the way he thinks others perceive him (‘a flabby, donut-loving cop’) and an overt remark on the way everyone is a victim of stereotyping. Interestingly, the Italian TT has replaced this remark with an even more self-disparaging comment (‘fa brutte figure’, ‘commits embarrassing gaffes’), which unfortunately erases the implied reflection on stereotyping in the original.

Many other instances of the characters’ stereotype-based attitude may be detected throughout the film. For instance, the condescending way Mayor Lionheart treats Assistant Mayor Bellwether, a sweet sheep belonging to the family of prey who, like the protagonist, is continuously neglected and humiliated. Bellwether herself explains to Judy that, in spite of her title, she is more of a ‘glorified secretary’ who ‘never gets to do anything important’, and even suspects that Lionheart gave her the job just to secure the sheep’s votes. 

While the mistreatment of these characters serves as a tool for showing how nobody is immune to social bias (even those who belong to the majority group), it may also be seen as a slight nod to misogyny. However, it seems to be no coincidence that the characters who engage in this type of career and must struggle against and put up with patriarchal attitudes are both female; and it is important to note that both Judy and Bellwether, in their refusal to accept the roles they have been relegated to, embody two different kinds of feminist characters (respectively the hero and the villain). Even more specific reference is made to sexist clichés about women, such as Nick’s statements: ‘Oh, you bunnies. You’re so emotional.’ or ‘Are all rabbits bad drivers?’. None of these items pose major translation problems but should be mentioned because they prove that gender-based bias is in fact one of the themes of the film.

4.2. Accents and Dialects

I would now like to examine some of the characters who are connoted in terms of accents and dialects, along with the possible implications this brings about. One case that stands out is that of the characterisation of Chief Bogo, whose name derives from the Swahili word for ‘cape buffalo’ (m’bogo). As mentioned earlier, he is voiced by Idris Elba, who used his native South African accent for the part in order to underline the animal’s ethnicity. There has been extensive discussion among academics of the portrayal of African American English (AAE) in Hollywood films. Bucholtz and Lopez (2014: 684) state that the dominant mediatised representations of AAE are usually based on a restricted set of grammatical, lexical and phonological features, and are often implicated in reinforcing racist stereotypes. Excluding a few exceptions, like Lilo & Stitch (Dean Deblois, Chris Sanders, 2002) and The Princess and the Frog (John Musker, Ron Clements, 2009), featuring the first African princess, Disney productions have often portrayed African Americans as frightening, evil characters or stereotyped them as ‘smart-mouthed, lazy, disrespectful’ tricksters (Lippi-Green 2012: 119).

Although Chief Bogo’s accent is clearly recognisable from phonological peculiarities like the dropping of consonants in syllable-final position (otter > otta) or the pronunciation of the final ng /ŋ/ as [n] (taking > takin), there are no stereotypical features in its grammar or lexis. He is introduced as close-minded and spiteful towards the protagonist, but he eventually comes to accept Judy and turns out to be a good chief. In the Italian translation, Chief Bogo speaks in standard Italian; therefore, any specific connotations regarding his ethnicity are erased.

Following Lippi-Green’s assessment that in animated films foreigners are generally portrayed as evil, Zootopia depicts the only non-American characters as a villain. Mr Big (whose name contrasts humorously with the shrew’s size) is a supposedly Italian crime boss[3] clearly inspired by Vito Corleone (The Godfather, Francis Ford Coppola, 1972) and is voiced by Maurice LaMarche, who affected an Italian accent to play the role. Mr Big is introduced as he threatens to ‘ice’ the protagonists (throwing them in cold water to kill them), surrounded by polar bears in suits who act like his personal bodyguards. The Italian portrayal of Mr Big perfectly adapts to the description made by Di Giovanni (2003) of the strategies adopted by Disney movies in the representation of Otherness: ‘Italianness’ is recreated using items that are familiar to the Western world and easily accessible to the original audience, starting from the reference to the Italian-American folk singer Jerry Vale and ending with the parody of the well-known movie The Godfather. In this scene, while speaking in his slow-paced raspy voice, Mr Big complains about Nick’s betrayal:

ST

TT

Gloss

MR. BIG: I trusted you, Nicky. I welcomed you into my home. We broke bread together. Gram-mama made you cannoli. And how did you repay my generosity? With a rug made from the butt of a skunk. A skunk-butt rug. You disrespected me. You disrespected my Gram-mama who I buried in the skunk-butt rug. I told you never to show your face here again and here you are, snooping around with this…[addressing Judy] What are you? A performer? What’s with the costume?

Io mi fidavo di te, Nicky. Tu sei stato accolto in casa mia. Hai mangiato alla mia tavola. La nonna t’ha preparato i cannoli. E tu come ricambi la mia ggenerrosità? Con un tappeto fatto con le chiappe di una puzzola. Un tappeto di chiappe di puzzola. Mi hai mancato di rrishpetto. Hai mancato di rrishpetto a me nonna, che ho seppellito nel tappeto di chiappe di puzzola. Ti ho detto di non farti rivedere mai più, ma tu ti fai trovare mentre ficchi il naso con questa… Chi è? ‘n’attrice? Pecché è in costume?

I trusted you, Nicky. You were welcomed into my home. You ate at my table. Grandma made you cannoli. And how do you repay my generosity? With a rug made from the butts of a skunk. A rug of the butts of a skunk. You disrespected me. You disrespected my grandmother, who I buried in the skunk-butt rug. I told you not to show your face ever again and here you are, snooping around with this… What is she? An actress? Why is she wearing a costume?

Example 2

Mr Big’s short speech serves a comic function: he accuses Nick of disrespecting him and his family, calling on the stereotypical Italian notions of ‘honour’ and ‘respect’ generally associated with the Sicilian mafia. The cultural reference to ‘cannoli’ (typical Sicilian pastries) is also used to construct the foreign context, since they are considered a symbol of Italian cuisine and food items are immediately recognised by the audience. The word ‘Gram-mamaserves the same purpose, modifying the informal English expression ‘grandma’ in order to make it sound more Italian, the labial /m/ assimilating the consonant cluster /nd/. Mr Big’s expressions ‘never to show your face here again’ and ‘snooping around’ also recall typical mobster jargon, thus evoking and reinforcing existing biases regarding Italian Americans and crime.

The Italian version adopts a literal approach to the translation of Mr Big’s speeches, with hints of informal spoken Italian (e.g. the contraction of ‘ti ha’ as ‘t’ha’, ‘chiappe’ for butt). In addition, actor and dubber Leo Gullotta emphasises his own Sicilian accent in order to achieve the maximum humorous effect. The most distinctive phonetic traits in his performance are connected to the use of typical Sicilian phonology in standard Italian words, e.g. the initial /g/ in ‘generosità’ is pronounced as the Sicilian cluster gg- (/dʒ/); a strongly trilled /r/ (rr- cluster) can be found in both central and initial position (respectively ‘generosità’ and ‘rispetto’); the use of the digraph ⟨sh⟩ (pronounced as /ʃ/) is found in ‘rispetto’ and ‘attrice’ where /c/ should instead be pronounced as /ʧ/ , whereas in Italian it is pronounced as /s/, the initial digraph ⟨tr⟩ in ‘trovare’ is pronounced as /ʈɽ/; and the assimilation in ‘pecché’ (/pekˈke/) where the /r/ of the standard Italian ‘perché’ (/perˈke/) is turned into /k/. From a lexical standpoint, Gullotta uses ‘me’ instead of the Italian standard possessive adjective ‘mia’, as well as the pronoun ‘chi’ instead of ‘che’ (what). Deleting initial vowel sounds when followed by a nasal sound (e.g. ‘n for ‘uno’ or ‘una’) as in ‘‘n’attrice’ is typical for both Sicilian and informal spoken Italian. It is also interesting to note that the religious reference in the ST ‘we broke bread together’ was replaced by ‘Hai mangiato alla mia tavola’ (You ate at my table), which retains the idea of gathering together as a family to share food as well as the religious/moral duty of helping whoever is in need. As can be inferred, the existing stereotypes regarding Italians in the source culture and Sicilians in the target culture are consequently maintained and reinforced.    

A similar approach is adopted in the creative transposition of Yax the Yak’s and Duke Weaselton’s voices. Respectively voiced by Tommy Chong and Alan Tudyk, in the original movie they are both characterised by particular speech patterns that are worth examining in detail. Yax is the owner of a naturist club where, much to Judy’s dismay, the animals are all completely naked, despite living in a world where mammals have evolved into wearing clothes. He is portrayed as a free spirit, living according to his own philosophy. Consequently, he features a ‘hippie’ style of English, marked by slow speech with prolonged vowel sounds and frequent use of the words such as ‘man’ and ‘dude’ to refer to others. In the Italian dubbed version Yax is voiced by Paolo Ruffini, who plays the role with his natural Tuscan accent and amusing adolescent language used to convey the character’s laid-back attitude. Example (3) is taken from the scene in which Judy and Nick visit Yax’s Mystic Springs Oasis, the last place Otterton (the missing otter) had been seen going:

ST

TT

Gloss

YAX: You know, I’m going to hit the pause button right there because we’re all good on Bunny Scout cookies.

Oh, bella zietta, tranquilla, ti stoppo prima di subito. Ce li abbiamo già i biscotti dei coniglietti scout.

Oh, cute little aunt, calm down, I am stopping you before right now. We already have bunny scout cookies

Example 3

 

Yax’s discourse is again an example of the ingrained stereotyped views held by the animals living in Zootopia: bunnies are more likely to engage in simple, trivial tasks such as selling biscuits rather than investigating a missing member of the community. From a linguistic standpoint, Yax’s idiomatic expressions ‘hit [or press] the pause button’ (meaning ‘hold on’, ‘wait’ or ‘slow down’[4]) and ‘we’re all good’ attempt to replicate the ‘hippie’ language that characterises him. What is more, the ST features the pun ‘Bunny Scout’, which is a play on the similar-sounding expression ‘Boy Scout’. The Italian translation ‘coniglietti scout’ loses the wordplay. However, the use of the Tuscan accent, marked for instance by the attenuation of the post-alveolar affricate /dʒ/ in ‘già’ (pronounced [ʒ]), accompanies the bovine’s peculiar physical appearance (he is unwashed, long-haired and surrounded by buzzing flies), compensating for this loss and providing an overall comic effect. The humorous function of the ST is also counterbalanced by the use of stereotypical Italian teen language, made of hyperboles, slang words, affixations and playful deformations (Ranzato 2015: 164). Examples in this sense are: the expression ‘bella zia’, a colloquial greeting from northern Italy emphasised here by the use of the diminutive suffix ‘-etta’ (as Yax is addressing Judy, who is much smaller than him); the idiom ‘hit the pause button’, translated into a form of the verb ‘stoppare’, deriving from the English ‘to stop’ and used with this meaning by teenagers or in the language of the media; finally, ‘prima di subito’ (before right now) is a forced, if not semantically incorrect, expression mainly used in advertising to convey a sense of urgency. In order to compensate for the loss of the original language varieties, Ruffini makes use of his Tuscan (Northerner) accent, which is usually perceived as humorous and is not loaded with negative connotations. Conversely, the dubbing team’s choice to connote the mischievous Duke Weaselton (dubbed by Italian actor and comedian Frank Matano) with a heavy Neapolitan accent and his overt use of dialect has proved to be more controversial. In the ST, Duke Weaselton speaks with a thick Brooklyn accent displaying recognisable features of English slang (e.g. the contractions ‘ain’t’ and ‘‘em’ and double negative; cf. Example (5) below). He is depicted as one of the antagonists: he is a thief, runs a stand of pirated DVDs, and declares that the only thing he cannot refuse is money. Example (4) below is taken from a scene in which Judy chases Duke after he has just robbed a store. While running away, Duke shouts:

ST

TT

Gloss

WEASELTON: Bon Voyage-e, flat foot!

Statt’ buon, sbirro!

Take care, cop!

Example 4

The mispronounced French expression ‘Bon Voyage-e’ has been replaced with the Neapolitan ‘statt’ buon’ (take care), thus probably aiming at producing laughs while also implying the character’s ignorance and low social status, or at least his lack of education. The words he uses to address Judy in both texts concur in conveying this diastratic connotation. The English American slang ‘flat foot’ for ‘police officer’ is coloured with derogatory undertones, as is the Italian translation ‘sbirro’, although ‘flat foot’ is often translated in dubbed Italian using the more literal and neutral ‘piedi piatti’. Weaselton’s overt dislike of the police force is also reaffirmed in Example (5) below. In this scene, Judy and Nick meet Weaselton while he is at his stand of pirated DVDs while trying to find a lead to solve the case:

ST

TT

Gloss

NICK: Well, well. Look who it is the Duke of Bootleg.

WEASELTON: What’s the deal, Wilde? Shouldn’t

you be melting down a popsicle or something?

Hey, if it isn’t Flopsy the Copsy.

JUDY: We both know those weren’t moldy onions I caught you stealing. What were you gonna do with those night howlers, Wessleton?

WEASELTON: It’s Weaselton. Duke Weaselton. And I ain’t talking, rabbit. And ain’t nothing you can do to make me.

Bene, bene. Guarda chi c’è. Il principe del contrabbando.

 

E tu che vuoi, Wilde? non hai da fare col business dei chiaggioli? Ehi, lei non è la coniglietta Zampepiatte?

 

 

Sappiamo entrambi che non ha rubato delle cipolle ammuffite. Perché volevi quegli ululatori notturni, Donnolino?

 

Donnolesi. Duke Donnolesi. E non ti dirò niente, coniglietta. E non riuscirai mai a farmi parlare.

 

Well, well. Look who’s here, the duke of smuggling.

 

What do you want, Wilde? Aren’t you busy with the popsicle business? Hey, isn’t she the flat foot bunny?

 

 

We both know you weren’t stealing moldy onions. Why did you want those night howlers, Donnolino?

 

 

Donnolesi. Duke Donnolesi. And I’ll say nothing to you, bunny. And you won’t make me.

Example 5

In the ST, Nick plays with Duke’s name and calls him ‘Duke of Bootleg’ to sarcastically comment on his illegal business. Weaselton therefore remarks on the fact that Nick is also involved in some kind of illegal business (melting large popsicles and reselling them as smaller ones). Weaselton then addresses Judy as ‘Flopsy the Copsy’, alluding to the character Flopsy in Beatrix Potter’s children book The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies (1909). Consequently, Judy intertextually refers to Duke as ‘Wezzleton’, and he immediately corrects her saying ‘It’s Weaselton’. Judy’s reply contains a reference to a character of the Disney movie Frozen (Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee, 2013). In the latter, the Duke of Weselton is constantly being called the ‘Duke of Weaseltown’; the humorous allusion stems from the fact that both the characters are voiced by Alan Tudyk, which is inevitably lost in Italian. The cultural reference to Beatrix Potter’s character is also lost, but the translators have attempted to compensate for it by coining the compound word ‘Zampepiatte’ (flatpaw), which recalls ‘piedi piatti’ (flat foot) omitted in Example (4). They have also added the diminutive ‘Coniglietta’ (little bunny) to retain the original mocking tone. Interestingly, Duke’s surname (Weaselton) is the only one that has been translated into Italian; using ‘Donnolesi’ allows the contrast to be maintained between Duke’s surname and Judy’s mispronunciation as ‘Donnolino’ (the suffix ‘–ino’ also seems to allude to his small size). Duke’s answer ‘Donnolesi. Duke Donnolesi’ recalls James Bond’s famous catchphrase. In this excerpt, Weaselton/Donnolesi speaks standard Italian, but the original Brooklyn accent is replaced with Neapolitan, featuring a particularly marked pronunciation of /u/ in ‘vuoi’ (which is closed) and ‘business’ as /bɪzɪnɪs/.

The Neapolitan dialect and accent chosen to characterise Weaselton fulfil the comic function of the film and can therefore be seen as an instance of what I call functional manipulation. Yet, it inevitably becomes problematic as it clashes with the film’s message. As a matter of fact, when released in Italian movie theatres Zootropolis was met with the protests of the Associazione Culturale Neoborbonica [Neoborbonic Cultural Association][5], whose spokesperson expressed his concerns regarding the use of the Neapolitan dialect and accent that could ultimately reinforce already existing clichés at the expense of Neapolitans (22 February 2016)[6].

5. Conclusions

Like translating children’s literature, dubbing animated films has always been challenging because of the specific audience it entails. Children cannot possibly understand difficult key themes, specific cultural references or overly sophisticated puns (Minutella 2016: 222-223). Until the 1990s Disney films followed very precise and ‘protective’ patterns, stemming from the ideas of the time about what children liked and what they should be taught: the storylines, the vocabulary and the humour were kept as simple and neutral as possible, with an almost total absence of popular or intertextual references. As a result, translators merely followed the same line, conforming to procedures of standardisation and lexical simplification.

Over time, things have changed considerably and films like Zootopia demonstrates that notable progress has been made particularly with respect to the way characters are depicted and conveyed through language. Zootopia’s display of many instances of linguistic variation (including regional varieties, foreign accents and sociolects) proves Disney’s attempt to be open to diversity and move away from the linguistic stereotypes used in the past (Lippi-Green 2012).

Consequently, the new content of movies like this requires a whole new level of creativity and balance to adequately convey the layers of meaning in the source texts, and the dual audience (children and adults) plays a fundamental role in the process of translation. All in all, it could be argued that the Italian translators have given special consideration to the comic skopos of Zootopia and the young audience it addresses. Italian dubbing often resorts to southern dialects in the translation of comedies, sitcoms and cartoons, thus producing humorous discourse and evoking the ‘Otherness of the South’ (Iaia 2015: 80). By the same token, in Zootropolis these strategies seem to compensate for the loss of the original language and may be easily excusable when they seek to convey the film’s sociolinguistics and its humorous function (Dore 2009). Notwithstanding this, this approach has the same merits and issues of the ST in relation to cultural representation. On the one hand, it has the merit of translating and maintaining the diversity of the ST (e.g. employing southern and northern accents and including features of sociolects like a range of teen language), in a way the target audience can understand and relate to. On the other hand, the choice to adopt a target-oriented strategy hinging on stereotypes and instances of linguistic profiling (especially related to southern Italy) seems to subvert the ST’s original message of inclusion and mutual tolerance. The dubbing of Duke Weaselton in particular seems to be one of those unfortunate cases in which the use of creative dubbing for comic purposes ends up perpetuating regional stereotypes related to the target culture, i.e. associating Naples (and southern Italy) with crime and theft.

Hence, far from suggesting that dubbing teams stop using creative dubbing altogether, I would propose considering its implications in more detail before opting for it.

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank Lydia Hayes for her insightful comments on Chief Bogo's accent.

References

Booker, Marvin Keith (2010). Disney, Pixar and The Hidden Messages of Children’s Films. Santa Barbara, CA, Praeger.

Bruti, Silvia (2009). ‘From the U.S. to Rome passing through Paris: accents and dialects in The Aristocats and its Italian Dubbed Version’. Marrano, M. Giorgio, Nadiani, Giovanni and Rundle, Christopher (eds.) The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia in Special Issue, inTRAlinea, http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/From_the_US_to_Rome_passing_through_Paris (accessed 06/08/2018)

Bucholtz, Mary and Lopez, Qiuana (2014). ‘Performing blackness, forming whiteness: Linguistic minstrelsy in Hollywood film’, Journal of Sociolinguistics 15, no. 5: 680–706.

Camuzio, E. (1993) ‘Voce/Volto. Problemi della vocalità nel doppiaggio cinematografico’, il verri marzo-giugno (1-2): 192-217.

Chaume, Frederic (2012). Audiovisual Translation: Dubbing. Manchester: St. Jerome Publishing.

Dore, Margherita (2009) ‘Target Language Influences over Source Texts: A Novel

Dubbing Approach, in The Simpsons, First Series, in Translating Regionalised Voices for Audiovisual, Federico Federici (ed.), Roma: Aracne editrice: 136-156.

Di Giovanni, Elena (2003). ‘Cultural Otherness and Global Communication in Walt Disney Films at the Turn of the Century’, The Translator 9: 207-223.

---- (2007). ‘Disney Films: Reflections of the Other and the Self’, in ‘Intercultural Communication’, in Special Issue, Culture, Language and Representation 4, José. R. Prado (ed.): 91-111.

Ferrari, Chiara (2006) ‘Translating Stereotypes: Local and Global in Italian Television Dubbing’, in Armstrong, N. and Federici, F. M. (eds.) Translating Voices, Translating Regions, Rome: ARACNE, pp. 123-142.

Hodson, Jane (2014). Dialect in Film and Literature. Houndmills, Palgrave MacMillan.

Iaia, Pietro Luigi (2015). The Dubbing Translation of Humorous Audiovisual Texts. Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

La Polla, Franco (1994). ‘Quel che si fa dopo mangiato: doppiaggio e contesto culturale’, in Il doppiaggio. Trasposizioni linguistiche e culturali, Baccoli, R., Bollettieri Bosinelli, R. M. and Davoli, L. (eds.), Bologna: CLUEB, 51-60.

Leonardi, Vanessa (2008). ‘Increasing or Decreasing the Sense of “Otherness”: the Role of Audiovisual Translation in the Process of Integration’ in Ecolingua: The Role of E-Corpora in Translation, Language Learning and Testing, Christopher Taylor (ed.), Trieste, EUT: 158-172.

Lee, Benjamin (2016). ‘Why are film titles being changed for international release?’, The Guardian, 9 March, https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2016/mar/09/why-are-film-titles-still-being-changed-for-international-release (accessed 15(09/2018).

Minutella, Vincenza (2016). British dialects in animated films: The case of Gnomeo & Juliet and its creative Italian dubbing. Status Quaestionis. Language, Text, Culture, 11: 222-259.

Lippi-Green, Rosina (2012). English with an Accent. New York: Routledge. 

O’Connell, Eithne (2003). ‘What Dubbers of Children’s Television Programmes Can Learn f rom Translators of Children’s Books?’, Meta 48 no. 1-2: 222-232.

Pavesi, Maria and Perego, Elisa (2006). ‘Profiling Film Translators in Italy: A Preliminary Analysis’, Journal of Specialised Translation 6: 99-114.

Raffaelli, Sergio (1994) ‘Il parlato cinematografico e televisivo’ in Serianni, L. and Trifone, P. (eds.) Storia della lingua italiana, II scritto e parlato, Torino: Einaudi, 271-290.

Ranzato, Irene (2015). ‘Dubbing Teenage Speech into Italian: Creative Translation in Skins’, in Audiovisual Translation: Taking Stock, Jorge Díaz Cintas and Josélia Neves (eds.), Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing: 159-175.

Rohrer, Finlo (2009) ‘How do you make children’s films appeal to adults?’, BBC News Magazine, 16 December.

Romero Fresco, Pablo (2006). ‘The Spanish Dubbese: A Case of (Un)idiomatic Friends’, The Journal of Specialised Translation 6: 134-151, http://www.jostrans.org/issue06/art_romero_fresco.php (accessed 05/08/2018).

Shavit, Zohar (1986). Poetics of Children’s Literature, Athens, Georgia: University of Georgia Press.

Streib Jessi, Ayala, Miryea and Wixted, Colleen (2016). ‘Benign Inequality: Frames of Poverty and Social Class Inequality in Children’s Movies’. Journal of Poverty: 1-19.

Zabalbeascoa, Patrick (2000). ‘Contenidos para adultos en el género infantil: el caso del doblaje de Walt Disney’ in Literatura infantil y juvenil: tendencias actuales en investigación Veljka Ruzicka, Vázquez, Celia and Lorenzo, Lourdes (eds.), Vigo: Universidad de Vigo, 19-30.

Zootopia. Directed by Byron Howard and Rich Moore. USA: Walt Disney Pictures, 2016.

Web sources

Associazione Culturale Neoborbonica, www.neoborbonici.it

Disney Wiki, http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/The_Disney_Wiki

Il Mattino, https://www.ilmattino.it

Nielsen Company, http://www.nielsen.com/us/en.html

Urban Dictionary, https://www.urbandictionary.com

Notes

[1] Here the pun involving Judy’s surname ‘Hopps’ is inevitably lost in Italian.’, as it also happens ‘Bunnyburrow’ above where the pun plays with the two homophonous nouns ‘burrow’ and ‘borough’.

[2] Nielsen Company Reports are available free of charge at: http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/search.html?q=2009+report&q1=Report&sp_cs=UTF-8&view=xml&x1=contenttypetag&i=1& (last accessed: 25/08/2018)

[3] However, cf. The Official Book of Zootopia that describes Mr Big as a self-made man of humble origins who runs a legitimate business, at http://disney.wikia.com/wiki/Mr._Big_(Zootopia) (accessed 20/08/2018).

[4] Cf. The definition provided by the Urban Dictionary for ‘press the pause button’, https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=press%20the%20pause%20button (accessed 07/11/2017). I am aware that the Urban Dictionary cannot be considered an entirely reliable source of information. However, I use it here to provide a general understanding of Yax’s speaking style.

[5] The Associazione Culturale Neoborbonica is a cultural movement aimed at reconstructing the history of southern Italy and promoting southern pride. More info at www.neoborbonici.it (accessed 05/09/2018).

 [6] Cf. ‘Neoborbonici contro la Disney: «Nel film “Zootropolis” luoghi comuni anti-napoletani», chiesto risarcimento”, Il Mattino, February 22, 2016 (accessed 05/09/2018).

About the author(s)

Margherita Dore is an Adjunct Lecturer at the University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’ and ‘Tor Vergata’. She holds a Ph.D. in Linguistics from Lancaster University, UK (2008), an MSc in Translation and Intercultural Studies from UMIST, UK (2002) and a BA in English and Latin American Studies from the University of Sassari, Italy (2001). In 2009-2010, she was Visiting Scholar at the University of Athens (Greece). She has (co)authored over fifteen papers and edited one essay collection on translation practice (Achieving Consilience. Translation Theories and Practice, Cambridge Scholars Publisher, 2016). She edited a special issue of Status Quaestionis on audiovisual retranslation (2018), one of the European Journal of Humour Research on multilingual humour and translation (2019) and co-edited a special issue of InTRAlinea on dialect and multimedia (2020). She is the author of Humour in Audiovisual Translation. Theories and Applications (Routledge, 2019). She has worked on the analysis of humour in a range of other contexts, including stand-up comedy.

Email: [please login or register to view author's email address]

©inTRAlinea & Margherita Dore (2019).
"Revoicing Otherness and Stereotypes via Dialects and Accents in Disney’s Zootopia and its Italian Dubbed Version"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2465

Fremdsprachliche Akzente im Animationsfilm Cars 2:

Vier synchronisierte Sprachfassungen im Vergleich

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Abstract & Keywords

English:

In contrast to subtitling and voice-over in dubbing the source-language soundtrack is completely eliminated and replaced by a target-language soundtrack. This gives translators, dialogue writers, voice actors and other parties involved in the synchronization process more freedom to deal with language varieties – to intensify, reduce, eliminate or add dialects or foreign accents because viewers do not have the possibility to compare the dubbing with the original film.

In cartoons Cars and Cars 2 the characters are personified cars of different origins; therefore, many of them are voiced and dubbed with foreign accents. The aim of the study is to investigate these foreign accents in the American film Cars 2 and in its German, Lithuanian and Russian dubbed versions. Phonetic, prosodic, lexical and morphosyntactic features are analyzed. In addition, attention is drawn to the interplay of other semiotic modes such as images and music, which serve to characterize characters of different nationalities.

The investigation shows that all characters, provided with foreign accents in the original film remain foreign in all analysed dubbed versions. However, different linguistic means are used to render the foreigness. Phonetic and prosodic means dominate, while the morpho-syntactic means occur primarily in the German dubbing. In addition, the nationality of the characters is enhanced by visual and acoustic non-verbal information.

German:

Im Unterschied zu untertitelten und mit Voice-over übersetzten Filmen wird bei der Synchronisation der ausgangssprachliche Soundtrack ganz eliminiert und durch einen zielsprachlichen ersetzt. Dadurch entsteht für Übersetzer, Synchronautoren, Synchronsprecher und andere an dem Synchronisationsprozess Beteiligte mehr Freiheit, mit Sprachvarietäten umzugehen – Dialekte oder fremdsprachliche Akzente zu verstärken, abzuschwächen, zu eliminieren oder hinzuzufügen, weil die Zuschauer keine Vergleichsmöglichkeit mit dem Filmoriginal haben.

In den Zeichentrickfilmen Cars und Cars 2 sind die handelnden Figuren personifizierte Autos unterschiedlicher Herkunft. So ist es selbstverständlich, dass viele von ihnen mit fremdsprachlichen Akzenten synchronisiert werden. Das Ziel der Untersuchung ist diese fremsprachlichen Akzente im amerikanischen Film Cars 2 und in seinen auf Deutsch, Litauisch und Russisch synchronisierten Versionen zu untersuchen. Beachtet werden dabei die phonetische, die prosodische, die lexikalische und die morpho-syntaktische Sprachebene. Außerdem wird auf das Zusammenspiel von anderen semiotischen Modalitäten (Zeichensystemen) wie Bild und Musik aufmerksam gemacht, die zur Charakterisierung von Figuren verschiedener Nationalitäten dienen.

Aus der Untersuchung geht hervor, dass alle Filmfiguren, die in der amerikanischen Originalversion mit fremdrpachlichen Akzenten versehen werden, auch in den untersuchten Synchronisationen mit entsprechenden Akzenten eingesprochen werden. Jedoch werden zur Charakterisierung von Figuren verschiedener Nationalitäten verschiedene sprachliche Mittel eingesetzt. Zu den dominierenden Sprachmitteln zählen phonetische und prosodische, während die morpho-syntaktischen vor allem in der deutschen Synchronisation vorkommen. Zusätzlich wird die nationale Zugehörigkeit der Figuren durch visuelle und akustische nonverbale Information verstärkt.

Keywords: synchronisation, animation, fremdsprachliche Akzente, Multimodalität, Charakterisierung von Figuren, dubbing, foreign accents, multimodality, characterization

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"Fremdsprachliche Akzente im Animationsfilm Cars 2:"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2464

1. Einleitung

Die Globalisierung und die daraus folgende Migration und Integration führen zu verstärktem Gebrauch verschiedenster Sprachvarietäten (Muysken 2010: 7). Da die Medien danach streben, die Realität mehr oder weniger abzubilden, werden Sprachvarietäten auch im audiovisuellen Material vermehrt eingesetzt. Sie erfüllen eine Reihe spezifischer Funktionen, die, wie Pavesi et al. (2015: 13) betonen, „not fully overlap with those of natural conversation and include moving the plot forward, providing background information, defining characters, and involving viewers emotionally and aesthetically.“ Besonders in der modernen Animation werden Varietäten häufig eingesetzt, um erstens einen möglichst authentischen Figurencharakter zu schaffen, um zweitens humoristische Effekte zu erzielen und um drittens stereotype Figurencharaktere zu schaffen, Stereotype erkennbar zu machen und zu verfestigen (vgl. Herbst 1994; Lippi-Green 1997; Ferber 2008; Parini 2009; Delabastita 2010; Corrius und Zabalbeascoa; 2011; Minutella 2014; Bruti 2014; Queen 2015).

Die Translation von Nicht-Standardvarietäten wird sowohl von den Übersetzern, als auch von den Übersetzungswissenschaftlern oft als ein gravierendes Problem gesehen, besonders in der audiovisuellen Übersetzung (Chaume 2012: 133; Pavesi et al. 2015: 13; Bruti 2014: 93). Eine besondere Herausforderung stellt die Übertragung von Dialekten im engeren Sinne in Untertiteln dar, weil hier das Gesprochene schriftlich wiedergegeben werden muss und viele Varietäten ausschließlich in mündlicher Form verwendet werden und erkennbar sind. In synchronisierten Filmen hat man bedeutend mehr Freiheiten. Arampatzis (2012: 67) formuliert dies treffend folgendermaßen: „In dubbing, where phonetic and paralinguistic markers may come into play through the audio channel the same way they do in the original text, there is a wide range of possibilities when it comes to translating language varieties.”

In der Translationsforschung herrscht im Allgeimenen Einigkeit darüber, dass Dialekte einer Sprache nicht ohne Konnotationsverluste durch Dialekte einer anderen Sprache übertragbar sind (Landers 2001: 117; Ellender, 2015: 180), weil ein Dialekt im engeren Sinne manchmal nur in einem konkreten Land erkennbar und mit bestimmten stereotypen Konnotationen verbunden ist, wie zum Beispiel Schwäbisch in Deutschland oder Niederlitauisch in Litauen. Eine etwas andere Situation besteht mit fremdsprachigen Akzenten, besonders, wenn es um L2-Sprecher geht, deren L1 zu großen oder in dem L2-Land weit verbreiteten Sprachen gehört. Darauf weist auch Herbst (1994: 125) hin:

Bei der Synchronisation ergeben sich hierbei jedoch weit geringere Schwierigkeiten als bei der Wiedergabe muttersprachlicher Varietäten, da ein direktes Äquivalent exisitert: „Französisches Englisch“ läßt sich bei der Synchronisation ohne weiteres als „französisches Deutsch“ wiedergeben.

Bei Übersetzung von Filmen, in denen nicht alle, sondern nur einige Figuren mit Akzent sprechen, unterscheidet Chaume (2012: 138) drei Möglichkeiten: a) denselben Akzent in der Synchronisation zu imitieren, denn fremde Figuren haben beim Sprechen in der Zielsprache ebenfalls einen Akzent; b) wenn es sich um Akzent der Zielsprache handelt, kann der Übersetzer ihn durch einen anderen Akzent ersetzen; c) Standardsprache in der Übersetzung zu verwenden und dabei Konnotationsverluste fremdsprachiger Akzente des Filmoriginals in Kauf nehmen. Laut Chiaro (2009: 159) ist es insbesondere bei Komödien und Animation üblich, dass die Figuren mit stereotypen Akzenten synchronisiert werden.

Die fremde Herkunft der Figuren wird im audiovisuellen Text nicht nur linguistisch, sondern auch durch andere semiotischen Modalitäten – Musik und Bild – wiedergegeben, die kreativ miteinander kombiniert werden (Díaz Cintas und Remael 2007: 228; Minutella 2014: 69; Bruti 2014: 90). Der Übersetzer hat jedoch nur auf den verbalen Text Einfluss, das heißt er übersetzt lediglich die Filmdialoge. Dementsprechend ist es einerseits möglich, die fremde Herkunft der Figuren aussschließlich linguistisch zu analysieren. Andererseits werden die Charaktere mittels mehrerer Modalitäten geschaffen; die durch verschiedene Zeichensysteme wiedergegebenen Informationen ergänzen einander und müssen demnach unbedingt berücksichtigt werden.

Bei der linguistischen Analyse können die traditionellen linguistischen Sprachebenen untersucht werden – die phonetische, die prosodische, die morphologische, die syntaktische und die lexikalische Ebene. Es muss allerdings betont werden, dass fremdsprachliche Akzente in Filmen, besonders in der Animation, nicht in genauem Nachahmen der Rede von Nicht-Muttersprachlern bestehen, sondern lediglich in der Nutzung von stereotypen, von den Rezipienten leicht zu erkennenden Merkmalen. Queen (2015: 170) bringt es auf den Punkt: „[W]hat matters for media producers is that the characterization is both recognizable and retrievable to a broad audience.“ Die Filmproduzenten und Synchronstudios imitieren fremdsprachliche Akzente, indem sie alle in der Zielsprache vorhandenen Ressourcen nutzen (vgl. Ellender 2015: 137).

Bei der multimodalen Analyse ist es möglich, eine Fülle von Zeichensystemen in Betracht zu ziehen, jedoch werden wir uns in diesem Beitrag auf die vier wichtigsten beschränken: visuell nonverbale, visuell verbale, akustisch verbale und akustisch nonverbale Information.

2. Zielsetzung und Vorgehensweise

Das Forschungsmaterial bildet der US-amerikanische Zeichentrickfilm Cars 2, die Fortsetzung des 2006 erschienenen Films Cars. Der Film erschien 2011 und wurde von Pixar Studio produziert und von Walt Disney Pictures verlegt. Der Drehbuchautor ist Ben Queen, John Lasseter führte Regie, während Brad Lewis Ko-Regisseur war. Neben der US-amerikanischen Filmversion werden auch drei Synchronisationen untersucht: die deutsche (bekannt ebenso als Cars 2), die litauische (Ratai 2) und die russische (Тачки 2). Alle handelnden Figuren im Film sind personifizierte Autos aus verschiedenen Ländern. Damit das Verständnis der wichtigsten Zielgruppe – Kinder – gesichert ist, sprechen die handelnden Figuren im amerikanischen Film US-Englisch. Die Herkunft der Figuren sollte jedoch nicht nur visuell, sondern auch verbal aufgezeigt werden, dazu dienten in diesem Film fremdsprachliche Akzente, die als Forschungsgegenstand dieses Beitrags gewählt wurden.

Akzente, Dialekte, kulturelle Variatäten werden von Whitman-Linsen (1992: 39-53) zu der auditiven beziehungsweise akustischen Synchronität zugeordnet. Damit wird betont, dass Akzente und andere sprachliche Varietäten mit Stimmqualitäten der Synchronsprecher zusammenhängen und von den Zuschauern akustisch wahrgenommen werden. Nicht weniger wichtig ist, dass Akzente mit dem Persönlichkeitstyp und dem Verhalten der jeweiligen Filmfigur harmonieren, das heißt mit der Charaktersynchronität, die in den theoretischen Abhandlungen manchmal als ein gesonderter Synchronitätstyp genannt (Fodor 1976: 10) oder explizit aus den Synchronitäten ausgeschlossen (Chaume 2012: 69-70) wird. Wie diese Aspekte im gewählten Zeichentrickfilm zusammenwirken, wird durch die Untersuchung der akustisch verbalen, der akustisch nonverbalen, der visuell nonverbalen und der visuell verbalen Information, kurz: durch multimodale Analyse veranschaulicht.

Obgleich andere Typen der Synchronität wie phonetische (auch Lippensynchronität) oder kinetische Synchronität nicht weniger relevant sind, werden sie aus Umfangsgründen im vorliegenden Beitrag nicht ausführlicher behandelt.

Die erste Aufgabe ist die fremdsprachlichen Akzente der Figuren zu identifizieren. Die zweite Aufgabe besteht darin zu analysieren, durch welche sprachlichen Mittel – phonetische, prosodische, lexikalische oder morpho-syntaktische – dieser Akzent realisiert wird.

Bei der Wiedergabe einer fremdsprachlichen Varietät handelt es sich nach Herbst (1994: 125) hauptsächlich

1. um die Imitation eines ausländischen Akzentes […];
2. um den Gebrauch fremdsprachiger Wörter im Text, insbesondere bei Floskeln, bei denen man davon ausgeht, daß sie auch der Zuschauer versteht.

Obwohl in der Sprache von Ausländern häufig auch Grammatik- oder Wortschatzfehler auftreten, spielen sie laut Herbst (ebd.) in der Synchronisation der Figuren fremder Herkunft eine weitaus geringere Rolle. Dies soll im Folgenden in den synchronisierten Fassungen des Zeichentrickfilms Cars 2 untersucht werden.

Da es um multimodale Texte geht, ist es wichtig, auch die visuelle sowie akustische nonverbale Information zu beachten. Die nächste Aufgabe besteht nun darin, die auf Deutsch, Litauisch und Russisch synchronisierten Versionen zu untersuchen, um herauszufinden, ob die im Original sprachlich als Fremde markierten Figuren in den genannten Synchronisationen ebenso mit fremdsprachlichen Akzenten eingesprochen werden. Als Letztes ist zu klären, ob die Akzente in allen vier untersuchten Filmsynchronisationen in gleicher Intensität und auf den gleichen Sprachebenen zum Ausdruck kommen.

Figur

Herkunftsland

Akzent

Francesco Bernoulli

Italien

Italienisch

Luigi

Italien

Italienisch

Mama Topolino

Italien

Italienisch

Onkel Topolino

Italien

Italienisch

Guido

Italien

Italienisch

Professor Zündapp

Deutschland

Deutsch

Tomber

Frankreich

Französisch

Ivan

ehemaliges Jugoslawien

Serbokroatisch

Victor Hugo

ehemaliges Jugoslawien

Serbokroatisch

Vladimir Trunkov

Ukraine

Russisch

Finn McMissile

Großbritannien

ohne Akzent, Italienisch, Französisch

Holley Shiftwell

Großbritannien

ohne Akzent, Italienisch

Diasu Tsashimi

Japan

Japanisch

Tabelle 1: Figuren, ihre Herkunftsländer und Akzente im animierten Film Cars 2

In der Tabelle 1 sind die handelnden Figuren aus dem animierten Film Cars 2 mit Angaben über ihr Herkunftsland und ihren Akzent aufgelistet. In der Regel stimmen die letzteren überein, außer in zwei Fällen: Finn McMissile und Holley Shiftwell sind britische Agenten, die sich manchmal als andere Personen ausgeben müssen, um ihren Auftrag erfolgreich zu erfüllen.

3. Wiedergabe des italienischen Akzentes

Wie aus Tabelle 1 ersichtlich, sind die meisten „Fremden“ im analysierten Film italienischer Herkunft. Auch eine der zwei Hauptfiguren im Film ist Italiener: der Formel-1-Rennwagen Francesco Bernoulli, der mit seinem Rivalen Lightning McQueen um den „World Grand Prix“ kämpft. Gerade die Gegenübertsellung der beiden Rivalen könnte eine der wichtigsten Funktionen sein, Francesco als Ausländer darzustellen, denn die Varietät kann dazu dienen, Differenzen von Filmfiguren aufzuzeigen (Pavesi et al. 2015: 15; Queen 2015: 31). Die Herkunft Francescos wird polysemiotisch durch den visuellen und den akustischen Kanal wiedergegeben. Visuell nonverbal wird auf das Herkunftsland durch die Farben der Nationalflagge Italiens referiert: Das personifizierte Auto Francesco ist nämlich in breiten senkrechten grünen, weißen und roten Streifen lackiert. Durch den visuellen Kanal wird auch von dem Stereotyp, Italiener seien temperamentvoll, metaphorisch Gebrauch gemacht: Beim Sprechen bewegt sich Francesco mehr als andere Figuren im Film, außerdem hebt er ganz häufig abwechselnd seine vorderen Räder (zum Beispiel 0:15:06, 0:15:08, 0:16:03, 0:16:40, 0:16:49, 0:16:53 usw.) – metaphorische Gestik, die nur für die Figuren italienischer Herkunft (zum Beispiel auch Luigi) typisch ist.

Auch visuell verbal wird auf Italien hingewiesen. Als Francesco in der Fernsehsendung „The Mel Dorado Show“ interviewt wird, erscheint ein Untertitel Rome, Italy, der den Handlungsort bezeichnet (00:14:22). Außerdem sieht man im Hintergrund des Sprechers Francecso die Hauptsehenswürdigkeit Roms – das Kolosseum, was visuell nonverbal auf Rom im Besonderen und Italien im Allgemeinen referiert.

Akustisch ist die italienische Herkunft Francescos vor allem aus seinen Dialogen erkennbar. Auf der phonetischen Ebene lässt sich der italienische Akzent sowohl in der amerikanischen Originalversion des Zeichentrickfilms als auch in der deutschen Synchronisation zunächst durch zusätzliche Endvokale erkennen, zum Beispiel eng. it is wird als [ˈɪtə ˈɪzə] und dt. entsprechend das ist als [ˈdasə ˈɪstə] ausgesprochen. In der deutschen Synchronisation sind auch Epenthese und Apokope ziemlich verbreitet, das heißt zwischen mehreren Konsonanten wird oft ein [ə] hinzugefügt und in manchen Fällen bleiben die Endkonsonanten unausgesprochen, wie zum Beispiel [ˈapslɛpəwagənə] für Abschleppwagen, [ausəru:nə] für ausruhen. Diese Interferenz ist „mit der unterschiedlichen typologischen Einordnung der Sprachen als silbenzählend (Italienisch) und akzentzählend (Deutsch)“ zu erklären (Rabanus 2001: 12). Die im Italienischen untypischen Konsonantenhäufungen oder Endkonsonanten werden von den italienischen Deutschsprechern ihrer Muttersprache angepasst, indem entweder der finale Konsonant getilgt oder ein [ə] hinzugefügt wird (Rabanus 2001: 12). Die Tendenz italienischer Muttersprachler, einen epenthetischen Vokal ans Ende englischer auf Konsonant endender Wörter anzuhängen, wird, laut Busà (2008: 115), häufig als ein stereotypes Merkmal des italienischen Akzents im Englischen betrachtet.

Ein weiteres markantes phonetisches Merkmal ist der für das Italienische typische stimmhafte alveolare Vibrant /r/ (das gerollte Zungenspitzen-R), das in der amerikanischen und in der deutschen Synchronisation zu beobachten ist, zum Beispiel in der US-englischen Originalversion des Films: It is an honor, Signore Dorado, for you [ˈɪtəˈɪzə ən ˈɑnər siːŋˈjo:re dəˈrɑdoʊ ˈfɔr ˈjuː] (00:14:20 – 00:14:24). In der deutschen Synchronisation ist das gerollte Zungenspitzen-R sehr deutlich in den Wörtern wie dir, sehr traurig und anderen hörbar. Obwohl für litauische Standardsprache ebenfalls das Zungenspitzen-R typisch ist, wird in der litauischen Synchronisation des Films das /r/ besonders hervorgehoben und länger als notwendig gerollt, zum Beispiel in den Wörtern Frančeskas, gar ‘Ehre’, neturėtų ‘sollte nicht’, prieš ‘vor’, greičiu ‘Geschwindigkeit’ usw.

In der deutschen Synchronisation ist außerdem noch die Aussprache von /ʃ/ und /h/ typisch für die Figurensprache mit italienischem Akzent. Statt /ʃ/ wird fast ausschließlich /s/ ausgesprochen, zum Beispiel verstecken als [fɐˈstekə], (ihr) schlaft als [sla:f], streiten als [ˈstraitə]. Das /h/ wird beim Sprechen der Figuren italienischer Herkunft meistens ausgelassen, zum Beispiel in Wörtern daheim, habe, hatte, helfen.

Sogar in drei analysierten Synchronisationen – in der US-englischen, deutschen und litauischen – macht sich der italienische Akzent Francescos auch durch verlängerte kurze Vokale bemerkbar. Dies ist damit zu erklären, dass es im italienischen Lautsystem nur sieben Vokale gibt, wobei es im Englischen 11-13 (abhängig von der Varietät), im Litauischen 11 und im Deutschen sogar 15 Vokale gibt. Wärend in den drei zuletzt genannten Sprachen kurze und lange Vokale unterschieden werden, werden im Italienischen alle Vokale beinahe gleich lang ausgesprochen. Dies spiegelt sich auch in dem animierten Film Cars 2 wider: Zum Beispiel, klingt das /i/ in den englischen Wörtern miss, his, is, insult fast gleich lang wie im Wort easy. Im Deutschen werden die kurzen Vokale ebenfalls oft verlängert, besonders bei betonten Silben, wie bestens, wirst, muss, rennen, Runde. Auch im Litauischen werden die betonten kurzen Vokale länger als in der litauischen Standardsprache ausgesprochen, zum Beispiel didelė ‘groß’, Frančeskas, nelengva ‘nicht leicht’.

Ein weiteres phonetisches Merkmal, das für das Italienische typisch ist und im analysierten Film für die Figurensprache gebraucht wird, ist das palatalisierte /l/. Es kommt in der US-englischen (zum Beispiel in Wörtern well, like, will, help, thankful, welcome, looks, meal) und in der russischen Synchronisation (zum Beispiel загрустил ‘wurde traurig’, был ‘war’, лучший ‘der beste’, полуторки ‘Lastwagen’) vor. In der litauischen Version wird die Palatalisierung von /l/ nicht konsequent angewandt, mal wird es vor den Vokalen der hinteren Reihe palatalisiert ausgesprochen, wie kilometrų ‘Kilometer’, valandų ‘Stunden’, was der litauischen Standardsprache widerspricht, mal wird es nicht palatalisiert, wie šlovės ‘Ruhm’.

In der Forschungsliteratur besteht weitgehend Einigkeit darüber, dass abweichende Prosodie die Hauptrolle bei der Produktion und Rezeption fremdsprachlicher Akzente spielt (vgl. Busà 2008: 116; Rogoni 2012: 92). Daher wird im Animationsfilm Cars 2 auf der akustischen Ebene neben den phonetischen Merkmalen auch von der Prosodie ausgiebig Gebrauch gemacht. Vor allem fällt der Sprechrhythmus der Figuren italienischer Herkunft im analysierten Film auf, besonders in der US-englischen, deutschen und litauischen Synchronisation. Dies ist damit zu erklären, dass das Italienische als silbenzählende Sprache gilt, wärend die untersuchten Synchronisationssprachen, nämlich Englisch, Deutsch, Russisch und Litauisch zu den akzentzählenden gerechnet werden. Die rhythmische Einheit ist im Italienischen also die Silbe, nicht der Takt. Über prosodische Sprachunterschiede des Italienischen und des Englischen schreibt treffend Busà (2008: 115):

in English vowels may span from full to reduced, in both quality and duration, and even disappear, depending on the degree of stress they receive in the utterance; in Italian, vowel quality tends to remain quite stable, regardless of the degree of stress on the vowel or any other phonological condition of the utterance. Thus, in English, phonological rules operating at the level of suprasegmentals (i.e., syllable structures, rhythmic tendencies, stress assignment rules, and intonation) trigger vowel reduction processes and create distinctions between vowels in ‘strong’ and ‘weak’ syllables. In Italian, these rules do not operate: syllables tend to have the same ‘weight’, and vowels are always fully pronounced.

Auf der morpho-syntaktischen Ebene ist zunächst festzustellen, dass es in der US-englischen Originalversion des Zeichentrickfilms keine Abweichungen von der Standardsprache gibt. Jedoch werden bei der Synchronisation der Figuren italienischer Herkunft in allen drei untersuchten Sprachversionen bewusst grammatische Fehler gemacht, um den Eindruck des fremdklingenden Akzentes noch zu verstärken.

Francesco Bernoulli 01:01:23 – 01:01:31

EN

DE

LT

RU

Is-ə no insult. When-ə Francesco is away from home, he misses his mama, just like-ə you miss your tow truck amico.

Diese keine Beleidigung. Wenn Francesco ist weg von Daheim, ihm fehlt die Mama, so wie dir fehlt der Absleppwage, was ist dein Amico.

Neketinu tave žeisti. Kai Frančeskas būna išvykęs, jis pasiilga savo mama. Kaip ir tu dabar pasiilgi savo sunkvežimio amico.

‘Ich habe nicht vor, dich zu beleidigen. Wenn Francesco weg ist, vermisst er seine Mutter. Wie auch du jetzt deinen LKW Amico vermisst.’

Зря ждёшь гадoстей, когда Франческо далеко далеко от дома, ему не хватает мамы. Также как и тебе твоего ржавого amico.

‘Vergebens wartest du auf Widerlichkeiten, wenn Francesco weit weit weg von zu Hause ist, fehlt ihm seine Mutter. Genauso wie dir dein rostiger Amico.’

Tabelle 2: Italienischer Akzent von Francesco Bernoulli in Cars 2 (01:01:23 – 01:01:31)

Von dem in Tabelle 2 dargestellten Ausschnitt aus dem Dialog Francescos mit Lightning McQueen sind grammatische Fehler in der deutschen und in der litauischen Synchronisation erkennbar. In der deutschen Version fehlt im ersten Satz das Verb ganz (dies[e] [ist] keine Beleidigung), im zweiten Satz werden Verben in der Hypotaxe nicht ans Satzende platziert (Wenn Francesco [...] weg von Daheim [ist]; was [...] dein Amico [ist]). Im Litauischen stehen Objekte im Genitiv, wenn das Verb mit Negationspräfix gebraucht wird, also sollte der erste Satz lauten: neketinu tavęs (Genitiv) žeisti (‘ich habe nicht vor, dich zu beleidigen’). Das Verb pasiilgti (‘vermissen’) ist in beiden Verwendungen inkorrekt konjugiert, außerdem regiert das Verb pasiilgti ein Genitivobjekt, also sollte der korrekte Satz so lauten: … jis pasiilgsta savo mamos, kaip ir tu pasiilgsti savo sunkvežimio amico.

Holley 1:02:38 – 1:02:45

EN

DE

LT

RU

Scusate mi tuti signori, mio nonno,

my grand-a father has-a broken down. If-a one of-a you would help, I would be so thankful.

Scusate mi tuti signori, mio nonno, meine Großvatere hate eine Panne. Wenn einer von Ihnen konnte helfen, ich wäre so e dankbare.

Scusate mi tuti signori, mio nonno, mano senelis sugedo. Jeigu kuris nors iš jūsų galėtų padėti, būčiau labai labai dėkinga.

‘[...] mein Großvater ist kaputt. Wenn einer von Ihnen helfen könnte, wäre ich sehr sehr dankbar.’

Scusate mi tuti signori, mio nonno, мой дедуля заглох у варото. Если uno из вас помогати, я буду molto презнательна.

‘[...] mein Großvater blieb vor dem Tor stehen. Wenn einer von Ihnen helfen könnte, wäre ich sehr dankbar.’

Tabelle 3: Italienischer Akzent von Holley in Cars 2 (1:02:38 – 1:02:45)

Das in Tabelle 3 angeführte Beispiel illustriert noch einmal Wortfolgefehler bei der Nachahmung eines deutsch sprechenden Italieners. Eigentlich ist die Protagonistin Holley Engländerin, aber als Geheimagentin soll sie sich als Italienerin ausgeben, daher wird ihr italienischer Akzent auf mehreren Sprachebenen geschaffen. Grammatische Fehler werden auch in der russischen Synchronisation absichtlich gemacht: Als verstellte Italienerin verwendet Holley Infinitiv mit zusätzlichem Endvokal помогать (‘helfen’) statt der Verbform in der 3. Person Singular: если кто то из вас поможет (Präsens Singular 3. Person), я буду очень презнательна ‘wenn einer von Ihnen helfen könnte, wäre ich sehr dankbar’.

Wie aus den in Tabellen 2 und 3 angeführten Beispielen ersichtlich, werden für die sprachliche Darstellung von Figuren italienischer Herkunft mehrfach lexikalische Mittel genutzt. Im erstgenannten Beispiel (Tabelle 2) wird das weitverbreitete italienische Substantiv amico (‘Freund’) in allen Filmversionen gleich gebraucht. Tabelle 3 zeigt, dass auch längere italienische Phrasen in die Gespräche integriert werden können. Die Wörter scusate ‘Entschuldigung’ und signori ‘Herren’ durften wohl keine all zu großen Verstehensschwierigkeiten bereiten, da sie erstens aus dem pragmatischen Kontext und zweitens entweder durch ihre Häufigkeit oder Ähnlichkeit zu anderen europäischen Sprachen verstanden werden können. Die Nominalphrase mio nonno ‘mein Großvater’ wird in allen Synchronisationen gleich übersetzt. Hingewiesen soll es noch auf die russische Synchronisation: Außer der besprochenen italienischen Phrase werden in der Rede von Holley zusätzliche italienische Wörter wie uno ‘ein’ oder molto ‘sehr’ hinzugefügt.

Francesco Bernoulli 01:01:13 – 01:01:17

EN

DE

LT

RU

For famous race cars like Francesco and, well, you, to be far away from home is not easy.

[unverständlich] der Francesco und du, beide weg zu sein von der Heimat ist molto difficile.

 

Tokiems garsiems lenktynininkams kaip Frančeskas, na, gerai ir tu prie jų, nelengva būti toli nuo namų.

‘Für solche berühmte Renner wie Francesco, ja gut, und du dazu, ist es nicht leicht, weg von zu Hause zu sein.’

Для всякой знаменитoй машины такой как Франческо, ну или ты, ездить вдали от дома тежелее.

‘Für jedes berühmte Auto wie Francesco, oder auch du, ist es schwieriger, weit von zu Hause zu fahren.’

Tabelle 4: Italienischer Akzent von Francesco Bernoulli in Cars 2 (01:01:13 – 01:01:17)

Der Ausschnitt in der Tabelle 4 ist in dem Sinne von Interesse, als nur in der deutschen Synchronisation lexikalische Mittel gebraucht werden, um den italienischen Akzent stärker wiederzugeben.

Bemerkenswert ist die Tatsache, dass die Figuren Mama Topolino und Luigi in allen vier untersuchten Filmsynchronisationen fast ausschließlich auf Italienisch reden.

 

EN

DE

LT

RU

Phonetik

gerolltes Zungenspitzen-R, palatalisiertes /l/, zusätzliche Endvokale, zum Teil verlängerte Vokale

zusätzliche Endvokale, /s/ statt /ʃ/, zum Teil verlängerte Vokale

zum Teil palatalisiertes /l/, verlängerte Vokale, stark gerolltes /r/

palatalisiertes /l/

Prosodie

Akzent auf jeder Silbe, plötzlich steigende Intonation am Ende des Aussagesatzes

Akzent auf jeder Silbe, steigende Intonation

Akzent auf jeder Silbe, plötzlich steigende Intonation am Ende des Aussagesatzes

̶

Grammatik

̶

Verberststellung oder -zweitstellung in Nebensätzen

 

inkorrekte Kasus von Objekten, inkorrekte Verbkonjugation

(inkorrekte Kasus von Substantiven, Verben im Infinitiv)

Lexik

Vereinzelte Wörter und ganze Phrasen

Vereinzelte Wörter und ganze Phrasen

Vereinzelte Wörter und ganze Phrasen

Vereinzelte Wörter und ganze Phrasen

Tabelle 5: Sprachliche Mittel zur Wiedergabe des italienischen Akzentes in Cars 2

Nach der Analyse der Figurensprache italienischer Herkunft kann nun eine Zwischenbilanz gezogen werden, die in der Tabelle 5 zusammenfassend dargestellt wird. In der US-amerikanischen Originalversion des Zeichentrickfilms Cars 2 wird der italienische Akzent durch phonetische, prosodische und lexikalische Mittel ausgedrückt. In der deutschen und in der litauischen Synchronisation werden zusätzlich grammatische Mittel eingesetzt, in der russischen Version nur beim Synchroneinsprechen einer Figur, nämlich Holley. Von den phonetischen Mitteln wird in der US-englischen, in der deutschen und in der litauischen Version am meisten Gebrauch gemacht, während die russische Version nur eine markante, dem Italienischen eigene phonetische Eigenschaft aufweist. Die Prosodie weicht in der russischen Synchronisation kaum von der russischen Standardsrpache ab, wobei die Intonation und der Sprechrhythmus in den anderen drei Synchronisationen eine entscheidende Rolle bei der Wiedergabe des italienischen Akzentes spielen. Lexikalische Mittel, zum Teil der Gebrauch längerer italienischer Phrasen, sind in allen vier untersuchten Synchronisationen sehr beliebt, besonders aber in der deutschen und in der russischen.

4. Wiedergabe des französischen Akzentes

Die einzige für die Handlung bedeutende Figur im Film, die aus Frankreich kommt, ist Tomber. Dadurch, dass das Auto nur drei Räder hat, ist es sehr instabil, daher auch sein Name, der auf Deutsch ‘fallen’ bedeutet (http://pixar.wikia.com). Dieses personifizierte Auto wurde nach dem englischen Reliant Regal geschaffen, doch einige Details stammen auch von den französischen Modellen Citroën AMI und Citroën DS (ebd.). Die Ähnlichkeit Tombers zu französichen Citroën-Autos könnte man als visuelle nonverbale Indizien seiner französichen Herkunft ansehen. Außerdem spielt die Handlung in dem Filmabschnitt, in dem Tomber auftaucht, in der französichen Hauptstadt Paris; darauf wird zunächst akustisch verbal hingewiesen, indem der britische Agent Finn McMissile dem Flugzeug Siddeley die Richtung angibt (Tabelle 6).

Finn McMissile 00:49:34 – 00:49:35

EN

DE

LT

RU

Paris. Tout de suite.

Paris, allez allez.

Tiesiu taikymu į Paryžių. ‘Geradewegs nach Paris’

В Париж. Je vous prie. ‘Nach Paris. Ich bitte Sie’

Tabelle 6: Französischer Akzent von Finn McMissile in Cars 2 (00:49:34 – 00:49:35)

Nachdem die handelnden Figuren in Paris gelandet sind, werden typische Kennzeichen der französischen Hauptstadt gezeigt: der Arc de Triomphe (Triumphbogen) und die Champs-Elysées (00:49:48), die Cathédrale Notre Dame (00:49:56), die Seine mit ihren Brücken (00:50:00), das Künstlerviertel Montmartre und Basilika Sacré-Cœur (00:50:01), der Louvre (00:50:06), der Eiffelturm (00:50:11) und andere. Somit wird visuell nonverbal auf Paris und Frankreich referiert. Die französische Atmosphäre wird akustisch verbal durch das Lied Mon Coeur Fait Vroum (Musik: Michael Giacchino, Text: Scott Langteau und Michael Giacchino, Sänger: Bénabar) (00:49:47 - 00:50:16) vervollständigt. Gesungen wird über die Liebe und über das Reisen, daher ist es eine kreative Anspielung sowohl auf Paris als die oft als Stadt der Liebe bezeichnete Hauptstadt (parallel dazu werden visuell nonverbal auf einer Brücke sich küssende personifizierte Autos dargestellt) als auch auf die handelnden Figuren, nämlich Autos. Die sich im Refrain ständig wiederholenden Onomatopoetika vroum, vroum, vroum referieren entsprechend sowohl auf den Herzschlag als auch auf das Motorbrummen.

Da schon durch den visuellen Kanal darauf hingewiesen wurde, dass die Handlung in Frankreich stattfindet, sind auch verbale Kennzeichen der Fremdheit von handelnden Figuren, in diesem Fall von Tomber, zu erwarten, denn, wie Bruti (2014: 93) bemerkt, Akzente werden in Filmen oft eingesetzt, um zu zeigen, dass die Handlung nicht in einem anglophonen Land stattfindet.

Akustisch verbal fallen zunächst phonetische Abweichungen von den jeweiligen Standardsprachen auf. In der US-englischen Sprachversion des Films hört man in der Rede Tombers sehr deutlich das palatalisierte /l/, zum Beispiel in Wörtern wie like, recalls, oil, filter, wheel, always, sold. In der litauischen Synchronisation wird das /l/ normwidrig vor den Vokalen der hinteren Reihe palatalisiert, zum Beispiel laiką ‘Zeit’. In der litauischen und in der russischen Synchronisation zeigt sich die Palatalisierung von postalveolaren Frikativen /⁠ʃ⁠/ und /ʒ/, zum Beispiel /ʃ⁠/ im litauischen elektrošokas ‘Elektroschock’ und im russischen электрошок ‘Elektroschock’, /ʒ/ im russischen вижу ‘[ich] sehe’. Da es im Französischen den ungerundeten geschlossenen Zentralvokal /ɨ/ nicht gibt, wird er als /ɪ/ ausgesprochen, zum Beispiel beim Verb выдумал ‘hat ausgedacht’.

Änlich wie bei den Figuren italienischer Herkunft verlängert auch der Franzose Tomber einige kurze Vokale, vor allem in der US-englischen (zum Beispiel in Wörtern wie Fin, filter, should, it, this) und in der litauischen (zum Beispiel in den Wörtern pardaviau ‘habe verkauft’, jis ‘er’, tvarko ‘repariert’, dabar‘jetzt’) Synchronisation.

Da es im Französischen den stimmhaften dentalen Frikativ /ð/ nicht gibt, machen viele französische Muttersprachler im Englischen Fehler bei seiner Artikulation. In der Originalversion des Zeichentrickfilms Cars 2 produziert Tomber statt /ð/ den stimmhaften alveolaren Frikativ /z/, zum Beispiel in der Aussprache der Demonstrativpronomen that, this, those, des Personalpronomens they oder des Artikels the. Allerdings wird diese Lautersetzung nicht konsequent durchgeführt, manchmal spricht Tomber den stimmhaften dentalen Frikativ /ð/ korrekt aus, wie in together (00:53:34) oder they (00:53:34).

Auch der stimmlose palatale Frikativ /ç/ ist im Französichen nicht bekannt, deshalb gibt es unter französischen Sprechern abweichende Realisierungen deutscher Wörter, die den so genannten Ich-Laut enthalten. Tomber spricht in der deutschen Synchronisation von Cars 2 statt /ç/ eher den stimmlosen postalveolaren Frikativ /⁠ʃ⁠/ aus, zum Beispiel klingt ich eher wie [ɪʃ], mich entsprechend wie [mɪʃ].

Eine weitere Besonderheit der französichen Sprache ist das Fehlen des Phonems /h/. Laut Neuhauser (2012: 156) wird „das in der Orthografie mancher Wörter vorhandene h entweder als h aspiré bezeichnet, wenn es sich um Entlehnung aus meist germanischen Sprachen handelt, oder als h muet. In der Regel werden beide Formen phonetisch nicht realisert“. Dieses phonetische Merkmal wird sowohl in der US-englischen Filmvariante ausgenutzt (zum Beispiel wird having als [ˈævɪn] ausgesprochen) als auch in der deutschen Synchronisation (zum Beispiel in den Wörtern hat, haben, geheime).

Ebenso bekannt ist der französische Akzent durch das gerollte uvulare Zungenspitzen-R. In der deutschen Synchronisation fällt es kaum auf, aber doch in manchen Wörtern der russischen Synchronisation, zum Beispiel продал ‘hat verkauft’ und встреча ‘das Treffen’. In der litauischen Synchronisation wird das Zungenspitzen-R auffällig intensiver gerollt als es für die litauische Standardsprache typisch ist, zum Beispiel in den Wörtern prasčiausias variklis ‘der schlechteste Motor’, ir ‘und’, dar ‘noch’, neturiu ‘[ich] habe nicht, nors ‘obwohl’ und viele andere.

Was in der deutschen Synchronisation noch an phonetischen Merkmalen des imitierten französischen Akzentes zu erwarten ist, ist die abgeschwächte oder gar fehlende Aspiration der stimmlosen plosiven Konsonanten. Laut Studien mit deutschen Probanden, die sich sprachlich als Franzosen verstellen sollten, „passten sich die Sprecher dem in der Literatur beschriebenen Muster an, dass stimmlose Plosive im Französischen in der Regel unbehaucht sind“ (Neuhauser 2012: 43). Diese Tendenz wird jedoch bei der Artikulation des deutschen Sprechers von Tomber in der untersuchten Animation nicht konsequent verfolgt, zum Beispiel aspiriert Tomber bei der Aussprache des erfundenen Städtenamens Porto Corsa, den er zwei mal in seiner Rede nennt, sowohl den stimmlosen bilabialen Plosiv /p/ als auch den stimmlosen alveolaren Plosiv /t/ wie ein deutscher Muttersprachler.

Auf der prosodischen Ebene soll zunächst die von den jeweiligen Standardsprachen abweichende Wortakzentuierung untersucht werden. Da die Betonung der ersten Silben bei mehrsilbigen Wörtern im Französischen unüblich ist, versucht man den französischen Akzent nachzuahmen, indem man einige Wörter auf der letzten oder vorletzten Silbe betont, zum Beispiel in der US-englischen Filmversion customer wird als [kʌsˈtəmə], secret als [siːˈkrət], meeting als [miːˈtɪŋ], Italy als [ɪtaˈliː] ausgesprochen. In der deutschen Synchronisation findet die Akzentverschiebung auf die letzte Silbe ebenfalls statt, zum Beispiel Ah'nung statt 'Ahnung. Was das Litauische angeht, so gibt es hier keine besonderen Akzentuierungsregeln, das heißt Wörter können auf einer beliebigen Silbe betont werden. Um der Figur Tomber einen französichen Akzent zu verleihen, wird auch in der litauischen Synchronisation oft die Betonung auf die letzte Silbe verlegt, zum Beispiel bei der Aussprache von švaistik'liai statt švais'tikliai ‘Kurbeln’, ža'lio suprati'mo statt 'žalio, supra'timo ‘keine Ahnung’. Auch in der russischn Synchronisation finden sich Wörter, die statt auf der ersten regelwidrig auf der letzten Silbe betont werden, zum Beispiel пах'нет ‘riecht’, выду'мал ‘hat ausgedacht’. Da im Russischen die Betonung von Vokalen immer auch eine Verlängerung bedeutet, werden infolge der Akzentverschiebung unbetonte Silben kürzer als betonte ausgesprochen. Eine ganze Reihe von Wörtern tragen regelwidrige doppelte Betonung: Nicht nur die in der russischen Standardsprache kodierte Silbe wird betont, sondern auch die für das Französische typische letzte, zum Beispiel in den Wörtern 'двига'тель ‘Motor’, поку'па'тель ‘Käufer’, 'яс'но ‘klar’, не 'лади'ли ‘haben sich nicht verstanden’, 'встре'ча ‘Treffen’und 'вы'слал ‘hat geschickt’. Analog zur Akzentverschiebung werden auch hier die zusätzlich betonten, das heißt die letzten Silben länger als in der russischen Standardsprache ausgesprochen.

Was die Intonation der Figur Tomber im Film Cars 2 betrifft, steht sie in der englischen und in der russischen Synchronisation im Kontrast zu den jeweiligen Standardsprachen. Die Mehrheit der Äußerungen von Tomber wird mit fallend steigender Intonation realisiert, was weder für das Englische noch für das Russische typisch ist. Die deutsche und die litauische Synchronisation hingegen weicht intonatorisch nicht von den jeweiligen standardsprachlichen Gepflogenheiten ab.

Auf der morpho-syntaktischen Ebene hervorzuheben ist die deutsche Synchronisation der Figur Tomber. Wie aus den Tabellen 7 und 8 zu entnehmen ist, setzt man in keiner anderen außer in der deutschen Sprachversion morpho-syntaktische Mittel ein, um den fremdsprachigen Akzent Tombers zum Ausdruck zu bringen beziehungsweise zu verstärken. In Tabelle 7 fehlt vor dem Substantiv der Artikel im Singular Akkusativ und die Dativendungen beim Adjektv und eventuell beim Substantiv, falls der Plural von Autos gemeint ist. Außerdem steht das Verb nicht an zweiter Stelle, was gegen die Syntaxregeln der deutschen Sprache verstößt. Im zweiten Satz fehlt das Pronomen es. Im dritten Satz nehmen beide Verben inkorrekte Stellung ein, vor dem Substantiv fehlt wieder der Artikel und die Präposition bei regiert Dativ, also sollte das Pronomen in der 2. Person Dativ (dir) sein und nicht im Akkusativ.

Tomber 00:52:15 – 00:52:28

EN

DE

LT

RU

I never liked new car smell. Speaking of recalls, you're getting up there in mileage, aren't you, Finn?

Geruch von neue Auto ich habe nie gemocht. Apropos Not, wie ist bei dir? Geht noch ohne oder du musst haben Starterkabel bei dich.

Man niekada nepatiko naujų mašinų kvapas. Ką čia taisyti, tu jau toks senas, kad tavęs ir norėdamas nieks nepataisytų.

‘Mir hat der Geruch von neuen Autos nie gefallen. Was kann man da noch reparieren, du bist schon so alt, dass man dich beim besten Willen nicht reparieren kann.’

Кто-то заводской краской пахнет. Ты потускнел дружище, некто из нас новее не становится.

‘Jemand riecht nach Fabrikfarbe. Du bist verblasst, mein Freund, keiner von uns wird neuer.’

Tabelle 7: Französischer Akzent von Tomber in Cars 2 (00:52:15 – 00:52:28)

In Tabelle 8 gibt es wieder mehrere Verstöße gegen die Regeln der deutschen Standardsprache: Im ersten Satz fehlt vor dem Superlativ der bestimmte Artikel und im Relativsatz das Pronomen es. Im zweiten Satz werden statt in der deutschen Sprache üblicheren Zusammensetzungen Ölfilter und Radlager Nominalphrasen mit von gebildet, jedoch auch in diesem Fall mit inkorrektem Genus.

Tomber 00:52:35 – 00:52:41

EN

DE

LT

RU

Beuck! That is the worst motor ever made. Wait. That oil filter. Those wheel bearings.

Bäh. Das ist schlechteste Motor, was je gegeben hat. Warten Sie, das Filter von die Öl, der Lager von die Rad.

Ve, tai pats prasčiausias kada nors pagamintas variklis. Luktelkit, tie švaistikliai, dar tie stūmoklių žiedai.

‘Igitt, das ist der schlechteste je produzierte Motor. Warten Sie, die Kurbeln und noch die Kolbenringe.’

Ах, не чaсто вижу такой дрянной двигатель. Стойте, уплотнительные кольца, головки поршней.

‘Ah, nicht oft sehe ich so einen miesen Motor. Warten Sie, die Dichtungsringe, die Kolbenboden.’

Tabelle 8: Französischer Akzent von Tomber in Cars 2 (00:52:35 – 00:52:41)

Auch viele andere Äußerungen von Tomber sind in der deutschen Synchronisation grammatisch inkorrekt, andere Beispiele sind: Aber er immer macht Geschäfte über Telefon; Seit viele Jahre ich frage mich, warum er braucht so viel Teile; Jetzt ich weiß; […] sie nie kommen zusammen, aber sie haben eine geheime Treffen übermorgen. Das heißt, die morpho-syntaktischen Mittel spielen bei der Wiedergabe des französischen Akzentes in der deutschen Synchronisation im Unterschied zu den anderen untersuchten Sprachversionen eine zentrale Rolle.

Bei der Analyse der lexikalischen Ebene ist festzustellen, dass die Figur Tomber in keiner der untersuchten synchronisierten Filmversionen französische Lexik verwendet. Dagegen findet man ganze französische Phrasen in der Rede des britischen Agenten Finn McMissile. Außer dem Befehl, nach Paris zu fliegen (Tabelle 6), verwendet er ebenfalls Aufforderungen auf Französisch in der Szene, als beide Agenten und Hook den Informanten Tomber in eine Garage bringen um ihn zu befragen und unerwünschte Autos loswerden wollen (Tabelle 9).

Finn McMissile (00:51:59 - 00:52:03)

EN

DE

LT

RU

Allez, maintenant vite!

Allez, hop dehors!

Ça va? Vite, vite iš čia!

Allez, maintenant vite!

Tabelle 9: Französischer Akzent von Finn McMissile in Cars 2 (00:51:59 - 00:52:03)

Auffällig ist dabei, dass, obwohl alle untersuchten Synchronisationen französische Phrasen verwenden, sich das deutsche und das litauische Synchronstudio für unterschiedliche Verbalisierungen entschieden haben, während die US-englische und die russische Filmversion übereinstimmen (Tabelle 9).

 

EN

DE

LT

RU

Phonetik

palatalisiertes /l/, zum Teil verlängerte Vokale, /z/ statt /ð/

stummes /h/, /⁠ʃ⁠/ statt /ç/

palatalisiertes /⁠ʃ⁠/, zum Teil verlängerte Vokale, stark gerolltes, apikales /r/

palatalisiertes /l/, /⁠ʃ⁠/ und /ʒ/, /ɪ/ statt /ɨ/, zum Teil verlängerte oder gekürzte Vokale, zum Teil stärker gerolltes, apikales /r/

Prosodie

Verschiebung der betonten Silben aufs Wortende, fallend-steigende Intonation

̶

zum Teil Verschiebung der betonten Silben aufs Wortende

zum Teil Verschiebung der betonten Silben aufs Wortende, fallend-steigende Intonation

Grammatik

̶

fehlende Artikel, Genusfehler, inkorrekte Endungen und Kasus von Pronomen, inkorrekte Satzgliedstellung

̶

 

Lexik

ganze Phrasen

ganze Phrasen

ganze Phrasen

ganze Phrasen

Tabelle 10: Sprachliche Mittel zur Wiedergabe des französischen Akzentes in Cars 2

Die akustischen verbalen Mittel zum Ausdruck des französischen Akzentes im Animationsfilm Cars 2 verallgemeinernd lässt sich sagen, dass phonetischen Mittel am stärksten in der russischen Synchronisation zum Einsatz kommen, gefolgt von der litauischen und der US-englischen Version (Tabelle 10). In der deutschen Synchronisation konnten nur zwei sehr deutliche phonetische Merkmale zur Wiedergabe des französichen Akzentes aufgezeigt werden. Auch von prosodischen Mitteln macht man in der deutschen Synchronisation kaum Gebrauch, während sich die Akzentverschiebung aufs Wortende in den anderen drei untersuchten Sprachversionen des Films als ein sehr produktives Mittel zur Wiedergabe eines französichen Muttersprachlers herausgestellt hat. Möglicherweise um die relativ spärlich genutzten phonetischen und prosodischen Mittel zur Kennzeichnung eines französischen Akzentes in der deutschen Synchronisation zu kompensieren, werden morpho-syntaktische Mittel herangezogen. Zu betonen ist, dass von allen vier untersuchten Synchronisationen nur in der deutschen die Figur Tomber grammatisch inkorrekte Äußerungen verwendet, und zwar eine ganze Reihe davon. Der eigentliche französische Muttersprachler Tomber verwendet in keiner der analysierten Filmversion französische Lexik, aber doch der Brite Finn McMissile. Er äußert ganze Phrasen auf Französisch.

5. Wiedergabe der slawischen Akzente

Mit slawischem Akzent sprechen im animierten Film Cars 2 Vertreter krimineller Gruppen. Nach Angaben von Pixar (http://pixar.wikia.com) hat die kriminelle Familie Hugos ihren Namen und das Aussehen von der als Yugo bekannten serbischen Automarke Zastava Koral, die im ehemaligen Jugoslawien produziert wurde. Visuell nonverbal wird also die slawische Herkunft der Hugos durch ihre Ähnlichkeit mit der jugoslawischen Automarke wiedergegeben. Der Kopf der kriminellen Familie ist Victor Hugo, die anderen arbeiten für ihn als Leibwächter. Fast alle Leibwächter außer Ivan sind schwarz. Ivan ist ein blauer Abschleppwagen, der sowohl als einer der Leibwächtern für Victor Hugo arbeitet als auch sein persönlicher Chauffeur ist und den Chef überall hinschleppt. Da der Name Ivan als ein typischer Name in slawischen Völkern gilt, ist er ein weiterer Indikator für die Herkunft der Filmfigur.

Das nächste personifizierte Auto, das zu den Antagonisten gehört und slawischer Herkunft ist, ist Vladimir Trunkov. Nach Angaben von Pixar (http://pixar.wikia.com) wurde er nach dem Modell ZAZ-968 Zaporozhets geschaffen. Diese Autos wurden ab 1958 in der ZAZ Autofabrik in der sowjetischen Ukraine gebaut. Nicht nur sein Modell sondern auch seine Farben zeugen visuell nonverbal davon, dass Vladimir Trunkov aus der Ukraine kommt, er ist nämlich hellblau und gelb nach den Farben der ukrainischer Flagge lackiert.

Akustisch verbal ist der slawische Akzent vor allem auf der phonetischen Ebene erkennbar. Als eines der deutlichsten Kennzeichen ist die Verlängerung von kurzen Vokalen hervorzuheben. Wie vorher schon erwähnt wurde, unterscheidet man im Russischen nicht zwischen langen und kurzen Vokalen. Die Vokallänge hängt von der Wortbetonung ab, indem betonte Vokale halblang ausgesprochen werden. Dies wirkt sich auch auf die Nachahmung des russischen Akzentes in allen untersuchten Filmversionen aus. Die standardsprachlich kurzen, aber betonten Vokale werden sowohl in der US-englischen (zum Beispiel in den Wörtern mess, in, big, professor, coming, insults, this is, assistance) als auch in der deutschen (Viktor, wann) und in der litauischen (akis ‘Auge’, Viktoras, gerai ‘gut’, čia ‘hier’, kada ‘wann’, privertei ‘hast gezwungen’, tavo ‘dein’) Synchronisation verlängert.

Einer der schwierigsten englischen Laute für Muttersprachler slawischer Sprachen ist der stimmhafte dentale Frikativ /ð/, deshalb wird er oft falsch ausgesprochen. Im untersuchten Film artikuliert man statt /ð/ oft den stimmhaften alveolaren Frikativ /z/, zum Beispiel in Wörtern wie the und this. Aber im Wort grandfather, das in einer Frage Ivans (01:10:36) vorkommt, wird /ð/ korrekt ausgesprochen [ˈɡrænfɑːðə]. Weiterhin fällt in der US-englischen Synchronisation ein stark gerolltes Zungenspitzen-R auf, zum Beispiel in den Wörtern Viktor, arrested, grandfather, road. Dies trifft auch für die deutsche Synchroniation zu, zum Beispiel in den Wörtern verhaften, wir, Ruhe, er, Großvater, hier, Party.

In der deutschen Synchronisation ist auf die Aussprache des stimmlosen palatalen Frikativs [ç] hinzuzuweisen. Gelegentlich wird er von Personen slawischer Herkunft als velarer Friktiv [x] artikuliert, zum Beispiel spricht Alexander Hugo schlecht als [ʃlɛxt] aus, wenn er über den als Ivan verkleideten Matter Er ist schlecht gelaunt sagt. Den gleichen phonetischen Fehler macht Alexander in der Verneinung nicht in seiner Frage, die in Tabelle 14 dargstellt ist. Genauso artikuliert Vladimir Trunkov die Verneinung nicht [nɪxt], als er auf die Frage Victor Hugos, ob der Big Boss schon angekommen ist, mit Nein, noch nicht antwortet. Allerdings ist die Aussprache des so genannten Ich-Lauts nicht homogen: Korrekte Artikulationen finden sind beispielsweise von Victor Hugo für das Pronomen mich [mɪç] in der in Tabelle 12 angeführten Frage oder von Vladimir Trunkov in seiner Phrase Ist nichts Persönliches.

Im Litauischen wird der lange geschlossene Vorderzungenvokal /e:/, der durch den litauischen Buchstaben <ė> schriftlich wiedergegeben wird, von vielen slawischen Muttersprachlern leicht diphtongisiert. Auch in der litauischen Synchronisation des untersuchten Zeichentrickfilms wird von dieser phonetischen Abweichung Gebrauch gemacht und der lange geschlossene Vokal /e:/ wird von Figuren slawischer Herkunft in Wörtern nerėk ‘schreie nicht’, pradėsim ‘[wir] werden anfangen’, nėra ‘es gibt nicht’ wie im russischen Wort нет ‘nein’ [nʲɛˑət] ausgesprochen. Fast in allen Fällen wird in der litauischen Synchronisation von Figuren slawischer Herkunft von Cars 2 das kurze offene /ɛ/ abweichend von der litauischen Standardsprache ausgesprochen: Meistens wird es leicht diphtongisiert, zum Beispiel in den Wörtern negaliu ‘[ich] kann nicht’, Gremlinas oder ne ‘nein’. Gelegentlich wird das kurze offene betonte /ɛ/ von Figuren slawischer Herkunft als palatalisiertes /a/ wie im russischen Wort пять ‘fünft’ ausgesprochen, zum Beispiel im litauischen Wort susems [su'sʲæms] ‘wird fangen’, senelis ‘Großvater’ [sɪ'nʲælɪs] oder die umgangsprachliche Fragepartikel ane [anʲæ]. Manchmal wird von den Sprechern slawischer Herkunft statt des kurzen offenen unbetonten /ɛ/ ein langes geschlossenes /e:/ artikultiert, zum Beispiel in den Wörtern lenkiuos ‘[ich] beuge mich’ und žemai ‘niedrig’. Auch bei der Aussprache anderer litauischer Vokale kommen bei den Figuren slawischer Herkunft Abweichungen vor: Das lange geschlossene /o:/ wird diphtongisert, zum Beispiel im Wort pasirodyti ‘sich zeigen’.

Außerdem wird der slawische Akzent in der litauischen Synchronisation des Zeichentrickfilms durch die Artikulation von Konsonanten wiedergegeben, und zwar durch die (Nicht-)Palatalisierung. Die durch die Buchstaben <ж, ц, ш> schriftlich wiedergegebenen Laute /ʒ/, /ʦ/ und /ʃ/ werden im Russischen nie palatalisiert, das heißt hart gesprochen. Im Litauischen können diese Laute, die durch die litauischen Buchstaben <ž, c, š> verschriftlicht werden, sowohl hart als auch weich ausgesprochen werden, je nachdem, ob ihnen ein Vokal der hinteren oder der vorderen Reihe folgt. Ebenfalls kann im Litauischen der Buchstabe <i> die Palatalisierung des davorstehenden Konsonanten markieren. Genau dieser Fall liegt beim Wort šiandien ‘heute’ vor, indem /ʃ/ mit slawischem Akzent hart ausgesprochen wird. Weitere Beispiele für regelwidrig hart ausgesprochene Frikative in der litauischen Synchronisation der Figuren slawischer Herkunft sind der Tabelle 11 zu entnehmen: be ryšio ‘komisch’, mašinos ‘Autos’ und bagažines ‘Kofferräume’.

Alexander Hugo 1:02:28 – 1:02:31

EN

DE

LT

RU

Gremlins. Man, those are some ugly cars. Look like someone stole their trunks.

Gremlins, Mann. Die sind schrecklich diese Autos. Sehen aus, als ob Kofferraum wäre abgefallen.

Gremlinai, ot be ryšio mašinos, a? Atrodo, lyg kažkas jam būtų pavogęs bagažines.

‘Gremlins, die Autos sind komisch, oder? Es scheint, als ob jemand ihnen die Kofferräume gestohlen hätte.’

Гремлины. Вот эти уродцы, да? Будто кто-то спёр багажник.

‘Gremins. Sind das Scheusale, oder? Als ob jemand ihnen den Kofferraum gestohlen hätte.’

Tabelle 11: Slawischer Akzent von Alexander Hugo in Cars 2 (1:02:28 – 1:02:31)

Von morpho-syntaktischen Mitteln zum Ausdruck des slawischen Akzentes wird genauso wie im Fall des französischen Akzentes nur in der deutschen Synchronisation Gebrauch gemacht. In dem in Tabelle 11 angeführten Beispiel fehlt im dritten Satz das Subjekt, im Nebensatz steht das finite Verb nicht an letzter Stelle und der bestimmte Artikel fehlt.

Victor Hugo 1:03:56 – 1:04:00

EN

DE

LT

RU

Ivan, why do you insult me so by making me wait here?

Ivan, Ivan, warum du beleidigst mich so und lässt mich einfach hier warten?

Taip, tu mane privertei laukti. Tai įžūlu iš tavo pusės. ‘Ja, du hast mich zu warten gezwungen. Das ist dreist deinerseits.’

Иван, Иван, ты что это меня ждать заставляешь? Страх совсем потерял? ‘Ivan, Ivan, warum zwingst du mich zu warten? Hast du ganz die Angst verloren?’

Tabelle 12: Slawischer Akzent von Victor Hugo in Cars 2 (1:03:56 – 1:04:00)

In der Frage in Tabelle 12 gibt es in der deutschen Filmversion ebenfalls Wortfolgefehler, wobei die anderen Synchronisationen ohne mopho-syntaktische Abweichungen von den jeweiligen Standardsprachen wiedergegeben werden.

Ivan 1:10:34 – 1:10:36

EN

DE

LT

RU

How is your grandfather?

Wie es geht deine Großvater?

Nu i[r] kaip daba[r] tavo senelis?

‘Na, wie ist denn jetzt dein Großvater?’

Как там ваш дедушка?

‘Wie ist denn Ihr Großvater?’

Tabelle 13: Slawischer Akzent von Ivan in Cars 2 (1:10:34 – 1:10:36)

Eine weitere grammatisch inkorrekte Wortstellung im Fragesatz ist der Tabelle 13 zu entnehmen. Daneben wird auch das Possessivpronomen in falscher Form gebraucht.

Alexander Hugo 1:10:42– 1:10:44

EN

DE

LT

RU

You are not leaving, are you?

Du nicht wollen fahren, oder, Ivan?

Tu juk neketini išeiti, ane?

‘Du hast doch nicht vor, wegzugehen, oder?’

Уже уезжаешь, так скоро?

‘Fährst du schon weg, so schnell?’

Tabelle 14: Slawischer Akzent von Alexander Hugo in Cars 2 (1:10:42– 1:10:44)

Unbedingt zu erwähnen ist die Frage von Alexander Hugo, mit der er sich an den als Ivan verstellten Matter wendet (Tabelle 14). In diesem Beispiel verwendet er in der deutschen Synchronisation nicht nur eine regelwidrige Wortfolge, sondern auch den Infinitiv statt einer finiten Verbform. Wie in den vorher angeführten Beispielen verzichtet man in der US-englischen und in der litauischen Synchronisation auf die grammatische Kennzeichen des Akzentes, hier wird der slawische Akzent vor allem durch phonetische Mittel wiedergegeben.

 

EN

DE

LT

Phonetik

verlängerte Vokale; /z/ statt /ð/; stark gerolltes Zungenspitzen-R

verlängerte Vokale; stark gerolltes Zungenspitzen-R;

[x] statt [ç] vor Vokalen der vorderen Reihe

verlängerte Vokale; Diphtongisierung von /e:/, /ɛ/ und /o:/; langes geschlossenes /e:/ statt kurzes offenes /ɛ/; nicht palatalisierte [ʒ], [ʃ], [t͡s], [tʃ] vor Vokalen der vorderen Reihe

Prosodie

̶

̶

̶

Grammatik

̶

Wortfolgefehler, inkorrekte Pronomenformen, Gebrauch von Infinitiven

̶

Lexik

̶

̶

̶

Tabelle 15: Sprachliche Mittel zur Wiedergabe des slawischen Akzentes in Cars 2

Aus der Analyse des slawischen Akzentes im Film Cars 2 geht hervor, dass die phonetischen Mittel zur Wiedergabe des slawischen Akzentes sowohl in der US-englischen als auch in der deutschen und in der litauischen Synchronisation dominieren (Tabelle 15). Besonders viele phonetische Abweichungen von der Standardsprache werden in der litauischen Synchronisation des analysierten Films eingesetzt. Bemerkenswert ist dabei, dass manche phonetischen Charakteristika, vor allem in der US-englischen und in der deutschen Synchronisation nicht konsequent eingesetzt werden. Diese inkonsistente Einsetzung von „verfremdenden Elementen“ sollte keine entscheidende Rolle spielen, „weil sich bei Performanzfehlern in der Fremdsprache dasselbe beobachten läßt“ (Herbst 1994, 125).

Nur das deutsche Synchronstudio hat sich dafür entschieden, den fremdsprachlichen Akzent slawischer Figuren auch auf der morpho-syntaktischen Ebene zu kennzeichnen. Bei der Analyse der Rede von Figuren slawischer Herkunft wurden weder auf der prosodischen noch auf der lexikalischen Ebene bedeutendere Abweichungen von den jeweiligen Standardsprachen festgestellt.

6. Wiedergabe des deutschen Akzentes

Im untersuchten animierten Film Cars 2 gibt es nur eine einzige Figur, die aus Deutschland kommt, und zwar Professor Zündapp. Er ist der zweite Hauptantagonist, ein verrückter Wissenschaftler und Waffendesigner, der, wie es sich später im Film herausstellt, für den Hauptantagonisten Sir Miles Axlerod arbeitet. Auf der visuellen nonverbalen Ebene signalisiert zunächst seine deutsche Herkunft sein Äußeres, er ist nämlich dem Modell Zündapp Janus nachempfunden. Von diesem Modell ist auch sein Name abgeleitet. Wie es auf der offiziellen Pixar-Seite (http://pixar.wikia.com) steht, ist sein Autokennzeichen BAD GA 58, was einerseits auf ihn als Antagonisten hindeutet (im Sinne von „bad guy“), andererseits die Heimatstadt Baden-Baden anzeigt. Die Ziffern bezeichnen das Baujahr, weil die Automarke Zündapp Janus in den Jahren 1957-1958 gebaut wurde. In der Szene, als Professor Zündapp kommt, um eine Ladung neuer Waffen zu überprüfen, erscheint 00:03:57 eine Suchanzeige mit seinem Photo, Namen und der Berufsbezeichnung „Waffendesigner“. Diese Angaben kann man zu der visuellen verbalen Information hinzurechnen, besonders in Bezug auf seinen Namen, denn Umlautbuchstaben sind eine schriftliche Besonderheit des Deutschen. Ansonsten gibt es keine weiteren visuellen Zeichen, die auf Deutschland oder deutschsprachige Länder referieren würden, so wie es bei der Analyse der italienischen oder französichen Akzente der Fall war.

Akustisch verbal soll wieder zuerst die phonetische Ebene untersucht werden. Bei der Analyse hat sich herausgestellt, dass weder in der US-englischen Originalversion noch in der litauischen Synchronisierung phonetisch markierte Äußerungen von Professor Zündapp festgestellt werden konnten. Selbstverständlich gibt es auch keine Abweichungen in der deutschen Synchronisation, da ja fast alle Figuren einschließlich Professor Zündapp in dieser Version Deutsch sprechen. Was aber die russische Synchronisation angeht, so gibt es in der Rede der untersuchten Figur eine ganze Reihe Abweichungen von der russischen Standardsprache, der deutsche Akzent ist also stark phonetisch markiert. Was zuerst auffält, ist die Aspiration von Plosiven, ein phonetisches Merkmal, das für deutsche Muttersprachler, die slawische Sprachen lernen, typisch ist. Im Standardrussischen gibt es keine Aspiration, aber in der Aussprache von Professor Zündapp werden die stimmlosen Plosive /p/, /t/ und /k/ deutlich aspiriert, zum Beispiel in den Wörtern потоке ‘Strom’, опасен ‘gefährlich’, агент ‘Agent’, телекамера ‘Telekamera’, антена ‘Antenne’, аргумент‘Argument’ und необрадует ‘wird nicht erfreuen’. Ein weiteres phonetisches Merkmal, das Deutsch von Russischen und anderen slawischen Sprachen unterscheidet, ist die Palatalisierung. Im Russischen werden nämlich fast alle Konsonanten sowohl in der palatalisierten (die so genannten weichen Konsonanten) als auch in der nicht palatalisierten Form (die so genannten harten Konsonanten) verwendet. Die Palatalisierung ist somit phonologisiert, das heißt bedeutungsunterscheidend. In der russischen Synchronisation palatalisiert Professor Zündapp vor allem den stimmhaften lateralen alveolaren Approximanten /l/, der im Deutschen beinahe in allen Posistionen gleich ausgesprochen wird. In Wörtern wie интересовался ‘hat sich interessiert’, передал ‘hat gegeben’, план ‘Plan’, убил ‘hat ermordert’oder луч ‘Strahl’ klingt also das /l/ viel weicher und somit fremdsprachig. Wie bei der Analyse des slawischen Akzentes schon erwähnt wurde, werden die russischen Laute /ʒ/, /ʦ/ und /ʃ/ nie palatalisiert. Der durch den Buchstaben <ж> schriftlich wiedergegebene stimmhafte postalveolare Frikativ sollte also in Wörtern wie ближе ‘näher’, может ‘kann’ oder желает ‘möchte’ hart ausgesprochen werden, wird aber in der russischen Synchronisation von Professor Zündapp weich artikuliert, das heißt palatalisiert.

Eine weitere Besonderheit des Russischen ist die Reduzierung und Veränderung der unbetonten Vokale. Besonders auffälig ist der Wechsel des unbetonten /o/ zu /a/. Auch im analysierten Zeichentrickfilm wäre zu erwarten, dass in der russischen Synchronisation das /o/ in unbetonter Position als /a/ ausgesprochen wird, aber in vielen Fällen wird von der Figur Professor Zündapp deutlich /o/ ausgesprochen, manchmal sogar mit Nebenbetonung: потоке ‘Strom’, опасен ‘gefährlich’, необрадует ‘wird nicht erfreuen’, остаётся ‘bleibt’, нужно ‘man muss’, второво ‘des zweiten’ und andere. Dennoch wird diese Abweichung nicht konsequent eingesetzt: Ungefähr die Hälfte der unbetonten /o/-Vokale wird gemäß den Ausspracheregeln des Russischen artikuliert, zum Beispiel in Wörtern верно ‘richtig’, концов ‘Enden’, процентов ‘Prozente’, воспользоваться ‘verwenden’, почему ‘warum’, это несложно ‘das ist nicht schwer’ und andere.

Auf der prosodischen Ebene wurden außer ein paar Betonungsabweichungen (in der russischen Synchronisation сдеˈлать statt ˈсделать ‘machen’ oder in der litauischen ˈtrūkuˈmą ‘Mangel’ deutlich mit Nebenbetonung) keine gravierenden Kennzeichen eines deutschen Akzentes festgestellt.

Die morpho-syntaktischen Mittel waren bei der Wiedergabe des deutschen Akzentes im Film nicht produktiv. Nur ein einziges Beispiel wurde gefunden, nämlich in der russischen Synchronisation, indem das Verb unflektiert, das heißt im Infinitiv gebraucht wird: неостоновить ‘nicht anhalten’ (siehe Tabelle 16).

Am stärksten offenbart sich der deutsche Akzent von Professor Zündapp in allen untersuchten Filmversionen auf der lexikalischen Ebene. In Tabelle 16 ist dargestellt, wie ganze deutsche Phrasen in allen untersuchten Versionen des Films Cars 2 übernommen werden. Auf den ersten Blick kann es erscheinen, dass die deutschen Phrasen, die in der englischen, litauischen und russischen Synchronisationen von Professor Zündapp geäußert werden, Verständnisschwierigkeiten verursachen könnten. Doch beim genaueren Betrachten ist ies nicht unbedingt der Fall, denn die deutschen Sätze werden im Weiteren paraphrasiert; außerdem ist das Substantiv Auto weitgehend bekannt.

Professor Zündapp 00:03:53 – 00:04:04

EN

DE

LT

RU

Was ist hier los? Zu viele Autos hier. Too many cars here. Out of my way.

Ah, yes. Very carefully. Sehr gut.

Was ist da für ein Durcheinander? Hier sind zu viele Autos. Räumt den Weg frei.

A ja, ganz vorsichtig. Sehr gut.

Was ist hier los? Zu viele Autos hier. Ko čia susigrūdot? Pasitraukit.

O taip, labai atsargiai. Sehr gut.

‘[...] Warum habt ihr hier euch so gedrängt? Zur Seite. Oh ja, sehr vorsichtig. [...]’

Was ist hier los? Zu viele Autos hier. Не толпитесь на дороге, а ну прочь!

Ах да, осторожнее. Sehr gut.

‘[...] Drängt euch nicht auf dem Weg, weg von hier! Oh ja, vorsichtiger. [...]’

Tabelle 16: Deutscher Akzent von Professor Zündapp in Cars 2 (00:03:53 – 00:04:04)

In der Szene (01:05:48 – 01:05:50), als der Antagonist Professor Zündapp zum Treffen von den im Film so genannten „Gurken“ kommt, begrüßt er alle auf Deutsch mit Guten Tag; das gilt sowohl für die US-englische Originalversion als auch für die litauische und die russische Synchronisation.

Professor Zündapp 00:07:38 – 00:07:43

EN

DE

LT

RU

Wunderbar! With Finn McMissile gone,

who can stop us now?

Wunderbar! Ohne Finn McMissile im Nacken, wer sollte uns da noch aufhalten können?

Wunderbar! Jie neteko Fino Raketos, jie bejėgiai prieš mus.

‘[...] Sie haben Finn McMissile verloren, sie sind machtlos gegen uns.’

Wunderbar! Вот и Макмисла нестало. Некто нас не остановить.

‘[...] Da jat man McMissile verloren. Niemand wird uns aufhalten.’

Tabelle 17: Deutscher Akzent von Professor Zündapp in Cars 2 (00:03:53 – 00:04:04)

Im Beispiel in Tabelle 17 ist zu sehen, dass das deutsche Wort wunderbar in allen Synchronisation gleichermaßen verwendet wird. Obwohl dieses Wort vielleicht nicht zu den bekanntesten deutschen Wörtern gehört, könnte man annehmen, das es aus dem Kontext und aus der visuellen Information relativ gut verstanden wird.

Professor Zündapp 00:32:12 – 00:32:18

EN

DE

LT

RU

That's him. He's the one. [...] Yes, sir.

 

Ja, Grem, der ist es. Leider ja.

Tai jis. Ieškosim jo. [...] Taip, pone.

‘Das ist er. Wir werden ihn suchen. [...] Ja, Herr.’

Also gut. Зто их агент.

[…] Jawohl.

‘[...]. Das ist ihr Agent. [...]’

Tabelle 18: Deutscher Akzent von Professor Zündapp in Cars 2 (00:32:12 – 00:32:18)

Obwohl in allen untersuchten Sprachversionen des Films der Gebrauch von deutschen Wörtern zu den beliebtesten Mitteln zur Wiedergabe des deutschen Akzentes gehört, muss noch gesondert auf die russische Synchronisation aufmerksam gemacht werden. Wie Tabelle 18 zeigt, werden in der russischen Synchronisation zusätzliche deutsche Wörter hinzugefügt, die in anderen Versionen des Films nicht gebraucht wurden.

Dass in der US-englischen und in der litauischen Synchronisation fast ausschließlich auf lexikalische Mittel zurückgegriffen wird, um den deutschen Akzent zum Ausdruck zu bringen, kann einerseits durch (Un-)Fähigkeiten der jeweiligen Synchronsprecher erklärt werden. Lippi-Green (1997: 84) und Bleichenbacher (2008: 60) weisen darauf hin, dass Lexik wohl die einfachste Möglichkeit ist, Fremdartigkeit zu markieren, denn es ist bedeutend leichter, Wörter oder Phrasen in unbekannter Sprache aufzusagen als einen ungeläufigen Akzent phonetisch zu imitieren.

 

EN

LT

RU

Phonetik

̶

̶

Aspiration von Plosiven, palatalisierter /l/ und /ʒ/, zum Teil unbetonter /o/ als /o/ statt /a/

Prosodie

̶

(+) Nur ein Wort mit Betonungsverschiebung auf die letzte Silbe

(+) Nur ein Wort mit Betonungsverschiebung auf die letzte Silbe

Grammatik

̶

̶

(+) Nur ein redelwidrig unflektiertes Verb

Lexik

ganze Phrasen

ganze Phrasen

ganze Phrasen

Tabelle 19: Sprachliche Mittel zur Wiedergabe des deutschen Akzentes in Cars 2

Den deutschen Akzent im Zeichentrickfilm Cars 2 verallgemeinernd lässt sich sagen, dass nur in der russischen Synchronisation zu phonetischen Mitteln gegriffen wird, um die Figur als deutschsprachig zu markieren. Einige phonetische Merkmale wie die Aussprache des unbetonten /o/ werden nicht konsequent eingesetzt. Ansonsten dominieren zum Ausdruck des deutschen Akzentes sowohl in der US-englischen als auch in derd litauischen und der russischen Version lexikalische Mittel.

7. Schlussfolgerungen

Die Untersuchung des Zeichentrickfilms Cars 2 und seine deutschen, litauischen und russischen Synchronisation hat gezeigt, dass die meisten Filmfiguren aus Italien kommen und dementsprechend entweder mit einem starken italienischen Akzent oder gar auf Italienisch (Mama Topolino, Luigi) sprechen. Es gibt Figuren, die aus Deutschland, Frankreich und aus slawischen Ländern kommen und entsprechende Akzente aufweisen. Alle Figuren im Film, die in der US-englischen Originalversion mit einem fremdsprachlichen Akzent synchronisiert werden, werden auch in den anderen untersuchten Synchronisationen mit Akzent eingesprochen. Jedoch sind die fremdsprachlichen Akzente nicht in allen analysierten Synchronisationen auf den gleichen Sprachebenen zu bemerken. Zu den produktivsten sprachlichen Mitteln zählen für die Wiedergabe von fremdsprachlichen Akzenten der Figuren in den US-englischen, litauischen und russischen Synchronisationen die phonetischen und die prosodischen. Der italienische und der französische Akzent werden in allen untersuchten Sprachfassungen mit phonetischen und prosodischen Mitteln wiedergegeben.

Was die morpho-syntaktische Ebene betrifft, wurde festgestellt, dass in der US-englischen Originalversion des Films Cars 2 keine von den untersuchten Figuren fremder Herkunft grammatisch regelwidrige Äußerungen verwendet werden. Demgegenüber werden in der deutschen, litauischen und russischen Synchronisation morphologisch und syntaktisch inkorrekte Äußerungen eingesetzt, vor allem zur Markierung des italienischen Akzentes. Insbesondere fällt auf, dass in der deutschen Synchronisation die grammatischen Mittel am häufigsten gebraucht werden, und zwar zur Kennzeichnung sowohl des italienischen als auch des französischen und des russischen Akzentes.

Die lexikalischen Sprachmittel werden im analysierten Film sehr gerne zur Verstärkung des italienischen und des deutschen Akzentes in allen untersuchten Synchronisationen eingesetzt, während nur einzelne Wörter zur Kennzeichnung von Französisch Sprechenden und gar keine zur Markierung von Figuren slawischer Herkunft benutzt wurden.

Bemerkenswert ist auch, dass nur in der russischen Synchronisation zur Markierung der Figur deutscher Herkunft sowohl phonetische als auch prosodische und lexikalische Mittel verwendet werden. Im Unterschied dazu wird dieser Akzent in der US-englischen und in der litauischen Filmversion ausschließlich mit Hilfe von Lexik angezeigt.

Allerdings werden linguistische Merkmale zur Kennzeichnung der Fremdheit nicht immer konsequent eingesetzt. Dies bestätigt die in anderen Forschungen festgestellte Tatsache, dass in Filmen Akzente nicht wirklichkeitsgetreu dargestellt werden: “[T]he focus is not on how ‘real’ or ‘authentic’ the analysed scripted dialogue is, but rather on how characters are established as stylised representations of particular social identities and on how narrative personae are constructed with recourse to stereotypes shared by audiences.” (Bednarek 2012: 201-202).

Neben den akustischen verbalen Mitteln wird für die Charakterisierung der Figuren fremder Herkunft im animierten Film Cars 2 auch von visuellen nonverbalen Mitteln Gebrauch gemacht. Erstens signalisieren die Automarken, die als Muster für personifizierte Autos im Film dienen, die Herkunftsländer der Filmfiguren. Zweitens werden bei der Gestaltung der Figuren Francesco Bernoulli und Vladimir Trunkov die Farben der entsprechenden Nationalflaggen benutzt, um auf die nationale Zugehörigkeit hinzuzuweisen. Neben dem Äußeren deutet auch das stereotype, für bestimmte Völker typische Benehmen der Figuren auf ihre nationale Zugehörigkeit hin, wie im Fall von Francesco Bernoulli. Nicht nur die Figuren selbst, sondern auch ihre Umgebung, zum Beispiel bekannte Sehenswürdigkeiten gehören zu visuellen nonverbalen Indizien für ein bestimmtes Land; in Cars 2 wird in dieser Weise auf Italien und auf Frankreich referiert. Schließlich werden visuelle verbale Mittel ausgenutzt, um auf das Herkunftsland der Figuren hinzuzuweisen, und zwar mittels Untertiteln bei Francesco Bernoullis Fernsehauftritt. Akustisch nonverbal trägt die Musik zur Charakterisierung der Figuren bei und akustisch verbal spielen zur Schaffung einer bestimmten nationalen Atmosphäre neben der Figurenrede auch die vorkommenden Liedtexte eine Rolle.

Literatur

Arampatzis, Christos (2012) „Dialects at the Service of Humour within the American Sitcom: A Challenge for the Dubbing Translator“ in Language and Humour in the Media, Jan Chovanec und Isabel Ermida (Hrsg.), Newcastle, Cabridge Scholars Publishing: 67-82.

Bednarek, Monika (2012) „Constructing ‘Nerdhood’: Characterisation in The Big Bang Theory“ Multilingua 32 (2/3): 199-229.

Bleichenbacher, Lukas (2008) Multilingualism in the Movies: Hollywood Characters and Their Language Choices, Tübingen, Francke.

Bruti, Silvia (2014) „Accent and dialect as a source of humour: the case of Rio“ in Translating Humour in Audiovisual Texts, Rosa, Gian Luigi De, Francesca Bianchi, Antonella De Laurentiis und Elisa Perego (Hrsg.), Bern, Peter Lang: 89-104.

Busà, Maria Grazia (2008) „Teaching Prosody to Italian Learners of English: Working towards a New Approach“ in Ecolingua: The Role of E-corpora in Translation, Language Learning and Testing, Christopher Taylor (Hrsg), Triest, Edizioni Università di Trieste: 113-126.

Chaume, Frederic (2012) Audiovisual Translation: Dubbing, Manchester, St. Jerome.

Chiaro, Delia (2009) „Issues in Audiovisual Translation“ in The Routledge Companion to Translation Studies, Jeremy Munday (Hrsg.), London und New York, Routledge: 141-165.

Corrius, Montse, and Patrick Zabalbeascoa (2011) „Language Variation in Source Texts and their Translations. The Case of L3 in Film Translation“ Target International Journal of Translation Studies 23 (1): 113-130.

Delabastita, Dirk (2010) „Language, Comedy and Translation in the BBC Sitcom ‘Allo, ‘Allo!“ in Translatioin, Humour and the Media, Delia Chiaro (Hrsg.), London, Continuum: 193-221.

Díaz Cintas, Jorge and Aline Remael (2007) Audiovisual Translation: Subtitling, Manchester and Kinderhook, St. Jerome.

Ellender, Claire (2015) Dealing with Difference in Audiovisual Translation, Oxford, Peter Lang

Ferber, Lauren (2008) „Pardon Our French: French Stereotypes in American Media“ The Osprey Journal of Ideas and Inquiry 7. URL: http://digitalcommons.unf.edu/ojii_volumes/7 (gelesen am 28. August 2017)

Fodor, István (1976) Film Dubbing: Phonetic, Semiotic, Esthetic and Psychological Aspects, Hamburg, Buske.

Herbst, Thomas (1994) Linguistische Aspekte der Synchronisation von Fernsehserien: Phonetik, Textlinguistik, Übersetzungstheorie, Tübingen, Niemeyer.

Landers, Clifford (2001) Literary Translation: A Practical Guide, Clevedon, Buffalo, Torronto, Sydney, Multilingual Matters.

Lippi-Green, Rosina (1997) English with an Accent. Language, Ideology, and Discrimination in the United States, London, Routledge.

Minutella Vincenza (2014) „Translating verbally expressed humour in dubbing and subtitling: the Italian versions of Shrek“ in Translating Humour in Audiovisual Texts, Rosa, Gian Luigi De, Francesca Bianchi, Antonella De Laurentiis und Elisa Perego (Hrsg), Bern, Peter Lang: 67-88.

Muysken, Pieter (2010) „Ethnolects as a Multidimensional Phenomenon“ in Language Contact: New Perspectives, Muriel Norde, Bob de Jonge and Cornelius Hasselblatt (Hrsg.), Amsterdam, Philadelphia, John Benjamins: 7-25.

Neuhauser, Sara (2012) Phonetische und linguistische Aspekte der Akzentimitation im forensischen Kontext: Produktion und Perzeption, Tübingen, Narr.

Parini, Ilaria (2009) „The Transposition of Italian-American in Italian Dubbing“ in Translating Regionalised Voices in Audiovisuals, F. M. Federici (Hrsg.), Rom, Aracne: 157-176.

Pavesi, Maria, Maicol Formentelli und Elisa Ghia (2015) „The languages of dubbing and thereabouts: an introduction“ in Languages of Dubbing: Mainstream Audiovisual Translation in Italy, Pavesi, Maria, Maicol Formentelli und Elisa Ghia (Hrsg.) Bern, Peter Lang,:7-26.

Pixar Animation Studios http://pixar.wikia.com (gesehen im September 2017)

Queen, Robin (2015) Vox Popular: The Surprising Life of Language in the Media, Chichester, Wiley Blackwell.

Rabanus, Stefan (2001) Intonatorische Verfahren im Deutschen und Italienischen: Gesprächsanalyse und autosegmentale Phonologie, Tübingen, Niemeyer.

Rognoni, Luca (2012) „The Impact of Prosody in Foreign Accent Detection. A Perception Study of Italian Accent in English“ in Methodological Perspective on Second Language Prosody, Maria Grazia Busà und Antonio Stella (Hrsg.), Padua, Cleup, 89-93.

Whitman-Linsen, Candace (1992) Through the Dubbing Glass, Frankfurt, Peter Lang.

Filme

Cars 2 (2011), DVD. Sprachen: Deutsch, Englisch, Türkisch. Walt Disney. (Regie John Lasseter, Brad Lewis), USA.

Cars 2 (2011), DVD. Sprachen: Lettisch, Russisch, Litauisch, Englisch. Walt Disney Home Video (Regie John Lasseter, Brad Lewis), USA.

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"Fremdsprachliche Akzente im Animationsfilm Cars 2:"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2464

The translatability of accent humour:

Canadian English in How I Met Your Mother

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Abstract & Keywords

American sitcoms often use different varieties of English as a source of humour. They frequently exoticise non-American-English speakers and treat their accent as bizarre and incomprehensible. This is also the case in How I Met Your Mother. One of the main characters in this series is Robin Scherbatsky, a Canadian journalist. Using examples derived from How I Met Your Mother, this paper takes as its subject Canadian-themed jokes as depicted in the original dialogues and their official TV translations into German (dubbing) and Polish (voice over). This is a unilateral analysis based on a parallel corpus with English as the source language and German and Polish as target languages. The aim is to see whether the meaning and/or function of these elements were/was preserved in the translations and what techniques were used in order to render humour in this series.

Keywords: sitcom, audiovisual translation, humour translation, Canadian English, diphthong raising

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"The translatability of accent humour: Canadian English in How I Met Your Mother"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2463

1. Introduction

The aim of this article is to present a translation case study devoted to occurrences of Canadian English in the US-American sitcom How I Met Your Mother that aired for nine years (2005–2014) on CBS and had a wide appeal among millions of viewers all over the world. The Canadian variety of English is used mainly for comedic purposes, and to a lesser extent, for characterisation. Canadian references are a recurring theme since one of the main characters, Robin Scherbatsky, is of Canadian origin. The instances of Canadian English were collected in a multilingual parallel corpus and juxtaposed with their official TV translations into German (dubbing) and Polish (voice over). The analysis consists of a comparison of the source and target fragments with the aim of establishing whether the original accent-related joke has been rendered in any way in the target languages.

2. Sitcom as a TV genre and a text genre

Before proceeding to the analysis of specific examples, I would like to present a general overview of what a sitcom as a TV genre and a text genre is.

Sitcoms are TV comedy shows that have some distinct characteristics, the most important of which is of course the central role of humour. Mintz (1985: 115) lists also such features as:

  • the relative short duration of episodes (the episodes last approximately 30 minutes);
  • limited number of recurring characters and sets (each week same people appear at the same location);
  • finiteness of the episodes (the problem depicted in one episode is not usually continued in the following ones);
  • and circular nature of the episodes as well as their happy ending (the aim of the episode is to resolve a given problem and restore the order).

Many people perceive sitcoms as quite simple, transparent and unchanging, but as media studies researcher Brett Mills (2009: 5, 44) emphasises, this is actually a misconception. In reality, many factors have to come together in order for sitcoms to be familiar and fresh for the viewers at the same time. Since sitcoms use neither very complicated plots nor multitude of characters, their scripts need to be wordy and witty but also very precise. Sitcom scriptwriters pay particular attention to the rhythm of the speech which can be ruined by one superfluous word (Smith 1999: 19; Blake 2014: 30). They also take speech sounds into account because these influence the humour of a given utterance as well (Smith 1999: 66–67; Sedita 2006: 17).

As has already been mentioned, sitcoms do not feature many characters. What is more, they make use of archetypes (cf. Mintz 1985; Smith 1999; Blake 2005; Sedita 2006; Butsch 2008). This way the viewers get an impression that they know the characters from the very beginning. Authors of handbooks for sitcom scriptwriters emphasise that the characters that they create have to seem familiar and a little bit quirky at the same time, and that they have to speak in a natural way (Blake 2005: 29, 52, 96).[1] In order to achieve that, scriptwriters let their characters speak in a dialect, sociolect or an idiolect. And sometimes they introduce a foreigner into their show as a means of reflecting the diversity of the society and creating comedy (cf. Smith 1999: 67).

3. Exoticisation of non-American-English native speakers

There are many instances in which sitcom scriptwriters included a foreigner among the recurring characters. One could list here Fez (unknown origin) from That ‘70s Show, Raj (Indian) from The Big Bang Theory, or three characters from 2 Broke Girls, namely Han (Korean), Sophie (Polish) and Oleg (Ukrainian). Sometimes the writers introduce new foreign characters so that they can create some jokes at the expense of their accent, language or simply their heritage. For instance, Two and a Half Men included a Polish woman in the episode Zejdź z moich włosów, couple episodes of Friends feature Paolo from Italy, and for a short moment, there was Gael from Argentina in How I Met Your Mother.

However, in American sitcoms they also have a tendency to involve non-American-English native speakers and make them seem rather exotic. For example, there is Daphne from Manchester, England, in Frasier, Emily from London, England, in Friends, and, as anticipated in the introduction, Robin from Vancouver, Canada, in How I Met Your Mother. Those characters are depicted as different from the US ensemble and they often become an object of mockery. Sometimes their ‘exoticness’ is reflected in their clothing, sometimes in their behaviour, and sometimes in their speech.

This analysis is devoted to the case of How I Met Your Mother and the jokes made at the expense of Robin Scherbatsky, a news anchor from Vancouver.

4. Canadian English as L3

Canadian English vocabulary and pronunciation embedded in the US-American English in How I Met Your Mother contribute to the multilingualism of the audiovisual source text and can be perceived in terms of L3 theory proposed by Corrius and Zabalbeascoa (2011). The term ‘third language’[2] used by these researchers is understood quite liberally since it encompasses not only natural and invented languages but also different varieties and some linguistic stylisations that are supposed to be regarded as languages (Corrius and Zabalbeascoa 2011: 115). Canadian English as L3 is, thus, a language variation that is inserted into the script for a particular purpose. It could also be considered a “pseudo-variation” since it “merely displays one or two stereotypical traits” (Corrius and Zabalbeascoa 2011: 115) which will be discussed below. Corrius and Zabalbeascoa (2011: 126) list several translation techniques for coping with L3 instances in audiovisual translation, including deleting, and repeating L3, substituting L3 with the target language, and substituting L3 with language other than the source and target languages.

Moreover, Corrius and Zabalbeascoa (2011: 123) emphasise that the presence of L3 may serve, for example, comedic purposes. This is a very important remark that needs to be considered here. As already stated, How I Met Your Mother is a sitcom, and Canadian accent is used as a source of humour. L3 seems, hence, to be “a means rather than a goal in itself” (Corrius and Zabalbeascoa 2011: 123), and the translators should bear that in mind. Sitcoms are, above all, comedy shows.

5. Canadian English in How I Met Your Mother

The use of Canadian English is a recurring theme in How I Met Your Mother that can be noticed in all seasons. The jokes feature Canadian pronunciation, mostly the pronunciation of the diphthong ou /əʊ/, a discourse marker eh added at the end of sentences, and some Canadian vocabulary like hoser, mountie, garburator, and loonie. Hence, they could be divided into three categories: jokes on the level of phonetics, jokes on the level of syntax, and jokes on the level of lexis. Some utterances could also be considered complex jokes because they exploit more than one from the listed phenomena. In order not to make this analysis overtly lengthy nor superficial, I will focus in detail on phonetic jokes disregarding for the time being the comedic use of the discourse eh and lexical Canadianisms.

6. Corpus analysis

The parallel corpus presented below consists of ten Canadian-related phonetic jokes that have appeared in How I Met Your Mother through the years. For each joke, there are two tables provided. One features source text, German translation, and its retranslation into English. The other depicts source text, Polish translation, and its retranslation into English. In each case, the reference to Canadian pronunciation (in the original) and an appropriate target-language counterpart are written in bold type.

When it comes to phonetic jokes, How I Met Your Mother makes references most of all to the so-called Canadian raising which influences diphthongs /aɪ/ and /aʊ/ before voiceless consonants (Hamilton 1997). In this sitcom, the Canadian pronunciation of the diphthong /aʊ/ is used as a source of comedy, mostly in the word out (pronounced /əʊt/), but there are also some instances in which the said diphthong appears in words about and house. Interestingly enough, in most episodes Robin says those words in an American accent. She uses the /əʊ/ sound only when the given utterance is meant as a Canadian-related joke and in some parts of flashbacks showing her in her youth, but in the latter case it is not used consistently. For example, in the episode 2×09 Slap Bet, Robin sings an original song with following lyrics:

I know, how about [əˈbəʊt] I sing you a song! […] Put on your jelly bracelets and your cool graffiti coat. At the mall, having fun is what it's all about [əˈbəʊt]. […] There's this boy I like. […] I hope he asks me out [aʊt]. […]

Both instances of the word about were pronounced in a Canadian accent, but it is not so for the word out.

Translators used following translation techniques to cope with this type of joke:

  • replacing a phonetic joke in L3 with a cultural joke in target language (L2);
  • replacing a phonetic joke in L3 with a neutral paraphrase in L2;
  • omitting the phonetic joke in L3 altogether;
  • replacing a phonetic joke in L3 with a colloquial paraphrase in L2;
  • and replacing a phonetic joke in L3 with a pun in L2.

Below you can see examples taken from the original show and its translations. The first one stems from the ninth episode of the first season (1×09) entitled Belly Full of Turkey. It introduces Canadian diphthong raising as a source of comedy for the first time.

1×09 Belly Full of Turkey[3]

Source language (SL) – English

Target language (TL) – German (dubbing)

Gloss

ROBIN: I'm Canadian, remember? We celebrate Thanksgiving in October.

TED: Oh, right, I forgot you guys are weird. You pronounce the word out, *oat*.

R: Ich bin aus Kanada, wie du weißt. Wir feiern schon im Oktober.

T: Oh, hab‘ ich vergessen. Ihr Leutchen seid komisch und im Fernsehen läuft bei euch nur Eishockey.

R: I’m from Canada, as you know. We celebrate already in October.

T: Oh, I forgot. You people are weird and there’s nothing but hockey on your TV.

Table 1. 1×09 Belly Full of Turkey – German version

In Table 1, it can be noticed that German translators decided to replace the original accent-related joke with a cultural reference to ice hockey. Hockey is one of Canada’s symbols and this theme emerges quite often in the source text. Robin is a fan of Vancouver Canucks and Wayne Gretzky. She is attracted to hockey players and she wears a hockey player costume for Halloween at one point (episode 7×08). Consequently, the translation fits in the context of the entire series perfectly. It reflects Ted’s mockery as well.

1×09 Belly Full of Turkey

SL – English

TL – Polish (voice over)

Gloss

ROBIN: I'm Canadian, remember? We celebrate Thanksgiving in October.

TED: Oh, right, I forgot you guys are weird. You pronounce the word out, *oat*.

R: W Kanadzie świętujemy w październiku.

 

T: Zapomniałem… I gadacie z takim śmiesznym akcentem.

 

R: In Canada, we celebrate in October.

 

T: I forgot… You also talk in a funny accent.

Table 2. 1×09 Belly Full of Turkey – Polish version

In the Polish version, a neutral paraphrase is used. Instead of giving an example of ‘weird’ pronunciation, the translator decided to simply state Ted's opinion on this subject. The colloquial verb gadacie ‘you (PL) talk’ could be considered slightly derogatory in this context, the neutral equivalent being mówicie (cf. Doroszewski 1969).

Also in the second example depicting Barney's description of Canadian pornography, the reference to accent is missing from both translations.

2×09 Slap Bet

SL – English

TL – German (dubbing)

Gloss

BARNEY: If I have to sit through one more flat-chested Nova Scotian riding a Mountie on the back of a Zamboni, I'll go *oat* of my mind.

B: Wenn ich mir noch eine flachbrüstige, rothaarige Halbfranzösin ansehen muss, die einen Eishockeyspieler mit Ahornsirup einreibt, verliere ich den Verstand.

B: If I have to watch one more flat-chested, ginger half-French girl who is rubbing maple syrup on a hockey player, I’ll lose my mind.

Table 3. 2×09 Slap Bet (1) – German version

As far as the German version is concerned, the phrase flat-chested Nova Scotian was changed in an interesting way. First of all, it was expanded by adding the adjective rothaarig ‘ginger’ which is probably attributable to some stereotypical perception of Canadian appearance. Second, the term Nova Scotian, naming an inhabitant of a particular Canadian province, was replaced by the noun Halbfranzösin ‘half-French woman’, indicating another common mockery theme in How I Met Your Mother, namely Canadian bilingualism. The lexemes mountie and Zamboni are also not represented in the translation. A reference to ice hockey has been made, though, by introducing the word Eishockeyspieler ‘ice hockey player’. This time, the translators decided to allude to a product characteristic for Canadian market, which is the maple syrup. Worth noting is also the fact that the originally very explicit sexual joke was substituted with a milder one in the German version.

2×09 Slap Bet

SL – English

TL – Polish (voice over)

Gloss

BARNEY: If I have to sit through one more flat-chested Nova Scotian riding a Mountie on the back of a Zamboni, I'll go *oat* of my mind.

B: Znowu będę oglądał deskowate panienki szalejące w górskich chatach. [no translation]

 

B: Once again I’ll be watching flat-chested girls going crazy in mountain cabins. [no translation]

 

Table 4. 2×09 Slap Bet (1) – Polish version

In the Polish rendition, the last part of the sentence was omitted altogether. The references to the Canadian province and police as well as to a machine used at ice rinks are also absent from the translation. However, a geographical allusion to mountainous regions of Canada was introduced into the target text by means of the phrase w górskich chatach ‘in mountain cabins’. Furthermore, instead of the term Nova Scotians, the derogatory colloquial noun panienki ‘girls’ was used. Along the same lines as in Table 3, the general undertone was softened here as well. Were it not for the entire context in which Barney discusses Canadian pornography, the verb szaleć ‘to go crazy’ would have an entirely different connotation.

The episode 2×09 Slap Bet features also a song discussed shortly at the beginning of this section. The following sentence introduces this song:

2×09 Slap Bet

SL – English

TL – German (dubbing)

Gloss

ROBIN: I know, how *aboat* I sing you a song!

R: Ich weiß wie, ich werde für Sie ein Lied singen.

R: I know how: I’ll sing you a song.

Table 5. 2×09 Slap Bet (2) – German version

2×09 Slap Bet

SL – English

TL – Polish (voice over)

Gloss

ROBIN: I know, how *aboat* I sing you a song!

R: Już wiem, zaśpiewam Panu piosenkę.

R: I know, I’ll sing you a song.

Table 6. 2×09 Slap Bet (2) – Polish version

As one can see, Table 5 and 6 depict neutral paraphrases both in German and Polish. There is no reference to Canadian culture in this short statement in either target language. This utterance comes from the very first in series of flashbacks showing Robin’s music career in Canada. Since in this scene the entire joke has a highly amusing visual part (music video starring Robin) as well as musical component (Robin singing a song), omission of the linguistic reference does not influence the comedic purpose of this fragment. This omission is also not that clearly recognisable because canned laughter follows five seconds later when the surprised expression of Robin’s friends can be seen.

Similarly to the first example, the next one turns again to the subject of Canadian Thanksgiving.

3×09 Slapsgiving

SL – English

TL – German (dubbing)

Gloss

BARNEY: Did you just say Canadian Thanksgiving was and I'm quoting, ‘the real Thanksgiving’? What do Canadians even have to celebrate *aboat*?

 

B: Hast du gerade gesagt, das kanadische Thanksgiving ist, und ich zitiere, „das echte Thanksgiving“? Bitte sag uns doch, was haben Kanadier an diesem Tag überhaupt zu feiern.

B: Did you just say that the Canadian Thanksgiving is, and I’m quoting, ‘the real Thanksgiving’? Please tell us what Canadians even have to celebrate on this day.

Table 7. 3×09 Slapsgiving – German version

3×09 Slapsgiving

SL – English

TL – Polish (voice over)

Gloss

BARNEY: Did you just say Canadian Thanksgiving was and I'm quoting, ‘the real Thanksgiving’? What do Canadians even have to celebrate *aboat*?

B: Twierdzisz, że kanadyjskie święto dziękczynienia jest tym prawdziwym? Co takiego świętują Kanadyjczycy?

B: You’re saying that the Canadian Thanksgiving is the real one? What do Canadians celebrate?

Table 8. 3×09 Slapsgiving – Polish version

Also in the case of Table 7 and 8, the original utterance was deprived of reference to Canadian accent in German and Polish versions. The denotative meaning is here the same in both renditions. The mockery is still present in the German translation. However, Barney’s attitude is not really rendered in Polish. Unfortunately, in the Polish version the visual channel was not really taken into consideration either since Barney is making a quotation-mark gesture to ridicule the phrasing the real Thanksgiving. This is not reflected in the target text.

Next example appears at the end of series of Canadian-themed sexual innuendos addressed to Robin. The source text is based on the same joke as previous examples: the pronunciation of the word out.

3×16 Sandcastles in the Sand

SL – English

TL – German (dubbing)

Gloss

MARSHALL: Wait, wait, wait. Did he…? I think I'm out.

TED: Yeah, I'm also *oat*. Okay, now I'm really out.

M: Wartet, wartet, wartet… hat er… ich bin raus.

 

T: Ich war gar nicht erst drin. Ich bin auch raus.

M: Wait, wait, wait… Did he… I’m out.

 

T: I haven’t even been in. I’m also out.

Table 9. 3×16 Sandcastles in the Sand – German version

The German translators tried to replace the original joke with a different pun using the antonymous pair of (colloquiual) adverbs drin – raus ‘inside – outside’ which can also be understood as a sexual insinuation and which fits in the context perfectly.

3×16 Sandcastles in the Sand

SL – English

TL – Polish (voice over)

Gloss

MARSHALL: Wait, wait, wait. Did he…? I think I'm out.

TED: Yeah, I'm also *oat*. Okay, now I'm really out.

M: A może… Chyba nic więcej nie wymyślę.

 

T: Ja też. Nic nie przychodzi mi do głowy.

M: Maybe… I won’t think of anything else.

 

T: Me neither. Nothing comes to my mind.

Table 10. 3×16 Sandcastles in the Sand – Polish version

As for the Polish version, the joke has once more been neutralised. It is important to underline that in this scene the visual context does not create humorous effect on its own. The actors are sitting in the booth in a bar and nobody is making any funny gestures. In a voiced-over version one can still hear the canned laughter. It is, thus, a clear signal for the target-language viewers that a joke has been omitted.

Example presented in Table 11 and 12 is intriguing. In this scene Robin pretends to be from Minnesota, but she accidently pronounces the phrase get out in a Canadian accent which is instantly noticed by the bartender.

4×11 Little Minnesota

SL – English

TL – German (dubbing)

Gloss

ROBIN: You think I'm trying to steal your bar? Get *oat*.

BARTENDER: ‘Get *oat*’? Are you Canadian?

R: Du hast also den Eindruck, ich versuche dir deine Bar zu klauen? Heiliger Ahorn!

B: Wieso Ahorn? Bist du Kanadierin?

R: So you think I’m trying to steal your bar? Holy maple tree!

B: How come ‘maple tree’? Are you Canadian?

Table 11. 4×11 Little Minnesota (1) – German version

The German translator decided to use a cultural joke instead of the original one by making again a reference to the maple tree. In this context, it works perfectly and makes the translation undoubtedly funny.

4×11 Little Minnesota

SL – English

TL – Polish (voice over)

Gloss

ROBIN: You think I'm trying to steal your bar? Get *oat*.

BARTENDER: ‘Get *oat*’? Are you Canadian?

R: Naprawdę tak myślisz? Chyba cię pogięło.

B: Pogięło? A ty co, z Kanady?

R: You really think so? You’re out of your mind.

B: Out of your mind? And you are what, from Canada?

Table 12. 4×11 Little Minnesota (1) – Polish version

The Polish translator resorted to the use of colloquialism. Chyba cię pogięło could be loosely translated as ‘you’ve gotta be kidding me’ or ‘you’re out of your mind’. However, it does not lead to the assumption that the person saying these words is Canadian. The bartender’s conclusion is, hence, quite surprising in the Polish rendition. The set up and the punchline of this joke are clearly not coherent.

The analysed episode 4×11 Little Minnesota features one more instance of Canadian English:

4×11 Little Minnesota

SL – English

TL – German (dubbing)

Gloss

CANADIAN: Well, sorry there. Didn’t see ya. Are you okay?

ROBIN: I’m fine.

CANADIAN: Okay, sorry *aboat* that. Have a donut on the *hoase*.

ROBIN: Thanks.

CANADIAN: OK.

MARSHALL: OK, you bumped into him, and he apologized and gave you a donut on the *hoase*.

C: Entschuldigung, ich habe dich nicht gesehen. Und wie geht’s?

R: Mir geht’s gut.

C: OK, tut mir wirklich leid. Ein Donut für dich, geht aufs Haus.

R: Danke.

C: Gern geschehen.

M: OK, du bist auf ihn daraufgefallen, er hat sich dafür entschuldigt und dir anschließend einen Donut spendiert?

C: Sorry, I didn’t see you. How are you?

R: I’m good.

C: Ok, I’m really sorry. Here’s a donut for you, on the house.

R: Thanks.

C: You’re welcome.

M: OK, you bumped into him, he apologized for that and gave you a free donut afterwards?

Table 13. 4×11 Little Minnesota (2) – German version

4×11 Little Minnesota

SL – English

TL – Polish (voice over)

Gloss

CANADIAN: Well, sorry there. Didn’t see ya. Are you okay?

ROBIN: I’m fine.

CANADIAN: Okay, sorry *aboat* that. Have a donut on the *hoase*.

ROBIN: Thanks.

CANADIAN: OK.

MARSHALL: OK, you bumped into him, and he apologized and gave you a donut on the *hoase*.

C: Przepraszam, wszystko w porządku?

R: Tak.

C: [no translation] Może pączek na koszt firmy?

R: Dzięki.

M: Wpadłaś na niego, a on przeprosił i dał pączka?

C: I’m sorry. Are you alright?

R: Yes.

C: [no translation] Do you maybe want a donut on the house?

R: Thanks.

M: You bumped into him, and he apologized and gave you a donut?

Table 14. 4×11 Little Minnesota (2) – Polish version

In this passage, there are two words with the diphthong /aʊ/, namely about and house. Both of these words are uttered by a Canadian man and the word house is later repeated by Marshall, one of the main characters, who tries to imitate the Canadian accent. Again in this case, neutral paraphrases were inserted in the translations, both in German and in Polish. The exaggerated politeness of Canadians and their fondness for donuts are also a common theme in How I Met Your Mother. For this reason, this dialogue can be considered funny in the target languages as well. Nevertheless, the reference to Canadian pronunciation has not been rendered in either translation.

The utterance presented in Table 15 and 16 is a different phonetic joke. This time Barney is in Canada speaking to some local people and he makes the word joke sound French by replacing the sound /dʒ/ with /ʒ/. As noted earlier, the bilingualism of Canadian people is also repeatedly indicated in the discussed series.

5×05 Dual Citizenship

SL – English

TL – German (dubbing)

Gloss

BARNEY: Number one: get real money. Don't know what board game this came from, but it's a *joke* [ʒəʊk].

B: Nummer 1: Druckt echtes Geld, Freunde. Ich weiß nicht, welchem Brettspiel ihr das hier entnommen habt, aber das ist echt zum Lachen.

B: Number 1: Print real money, friends. I don’t know which board game you took it from, but it’s a real joke.

Table 15. 5×05 Dual Citizenship – German version

This time, the German translators paraphrased the source text and did not provide a joke in the target language. The denotative meaning was slightly modified, though, by adding an adverb echt ‘really’. As a result, Barney’s disdain is strongly emphasised.

5×05 Dual Citizenship

SL – English

TL – Polish (voice over)

Gloss

BARNEY: Number one: get real money. Don't know what board game this came from, but it's a *joke* [ʒəʊk].

B: Załatwcie sobie prawdziwe pieniądze. Te są z jakiejś gry… dla dzieci.

B: Get real money. This comes from some game… for children.

Table 16. 5×05 Dual Citizenship – Polish version

The Polish translator, on the other hand, tried to underline how ridiculous Canadian money is for Barney by adding the prepositional phrase dla dzieci ‘for children’ to the word game meaning ‘game for children’. However, the punchline does not really create a humorous effect. Neither does it require a dramatic pause since the collocation ‘game for children’ is standard and not really surprising. It seems that the expansion of this noun phrase does not necessarily improve the entire joke.

The last examples from the episode 8×15 P.S. I Love You are based once more on the pronunciation of the word about. This time, Barney, who does not want to admit that he is a quarter Canadian, is talking first to Robin’s Canadian ex-boyfriend and then to Alan Thicke, a Canadian actor who stars as himself in How I Met Your Mother. Both times he accidently pronounces the word about in a Canadian accent. It is a sort of slip of the tongue[4] and Barney corrects himself instantly.

8×15 P.S. I Love You

SL – English

TL – German (dubbing)

Gloss

BARNEY: No. I'm not Canadian. Not even a quarter Canadian on my father's side. Shut up. We're not talking *aboat* me… about me.

B: Nein, ich bin kein Kanadier. Nicht mal ein Viertel Kanadier väterlicherseits. Halt ja die Klappe. Wir reden nicht von mir oder über mich.

B: No, I’m not Canadian. Not even a quarter Canadian on my father’s side. Shut up. We’re not talking of me or about me.

Table 17. 8×15 P.S. I Love You (1) – German version

8×15 P.S. I Love You

SL – English

TL – Polish (voice over)

Gloss

BARNEY: No. I'm not Canadian. Not even a quarter Canadian on my father's side. Shut up. We're not talking *aboat* me… about me.

B: Nie jestem Kanadyjczykiem. Nawet w jednej czwartej ze strony ojca. Milcz. Nie rozmawiamy o mnie.

B: I’m not Canadian. Not even a quarter on my father's side. Shut up. We’re not talking about me.

Table 18. 8×15 P.S. I Love You (1) – Polish version

8×15 P.S. I Love You

SL – English

TL – German (dubbing)

Gloss

ALAN THICKE: What? That song's not about me.

BARNEY: Then who is it *aboat*… about. Damn it.

AT: Der Song handelt nicht von mir.

B: Und von wem handelt er denn, ich meine „dann“, verdammt!

AT: That song is not about me.

B: So who is it about than, I mean then, shit!

Table 19. 8×15 P.S. I Love You (2) – German version

8×15 P.S. I Love You

SL – English

TL – Polish (voice over)

Gloss

ALAN THICKE: What? That song's not about me.

BARNEY: Then who is it *aboat*… about. Damn it.

AT: Ta piosenka nie jest o mnie.

B: To o kim?

AT: That song is not about me.

B: About whom then?

Table 20. 8×15 P.S. I Love You (2) – Polish version

The Polish version (Table 18 and 20) omits the joke in both fragments. Neutral paraphrases are provided for Barney’s utterances. Both prepositions are used correctly and there is no trace of the slip of the tongue in the target language.

As for the German translation, it creates an impression that Barney is not sure how to speak grammatically correct. In Table 17, there are two possible prepositions that collocate with the verb reden ‘to speak’, and Barney cannot decide which one to use. Table 19 shows a different kind of a slip of the tongue. In this rendition, Barney confuses two really similar words denn and dann (both translated as ‘then’ into English). Both utterances reflect Barney’s confusion quite well. Of course, the target-language slips of the tongue evoke different connotations than the original. There is no reference to Barney’s Canadian roots. His befuddlement could be connected to his jealousy of his fiancée, Robin. The joke, although different, is still humorous in the translation.

7. Conclusions

The presented analysis has shown that Canadian English is not only means to introduce multilingualism into the original dialogues in How I Met You Mother, but is, above all, a source of comedy. Moreover, it is rather striking that not all instances of humour were rendered in the German and Polish translations. Many humorous fragments were paraphrased in a neutral way (see for example Table 2, 3, 5, 6, 10) or omitted altogether (see for example Table 4, 14, 18, 20). In some cases, it can be justified by the fact that the said fragment was just a part of a bigger joke and that the rest of the conversation or its visual context compensated for the loss in the translation (see for example Table 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 14). In others, the target viewers are simply deprived of the opportunity to laugh more (see for example Table 10, 18, 20).

Judging by the lack of any reference to Canadian English, one can say that the actual accent-related character of the original jokes was perceived as untranslatable by the translators. The reason for that is probably lacking linguistic stereotypes about Canadians both in Poland and in Germany. Some of the phonetic jokes have, however, been replaced by cultural jokes making use of other types of stereotypes, for example by referring to Canadian symbols (see Table 11), appearance (see Table 3), hobbies (see Table 1), language knowledge (see Table 3), local products (see Table 3), and landscape (see Table 4).

Clearly, there are no instances of L3 in the target texts. For the most part, L3 was replaced by the target language (L3 → L2). This applies to cultural jokes, puns as well as neutral and colloquial paraphrases. In the one remaining technique which consisted in omitting the joke, L3 was deleted altogether (L3 → Ø).

However, it seems that forfeiting the original character of the joke was not the one and only solution. Taking into consideration Canadian bilingualism, which is also a target of jokes in the analysed series, one could insert into translation some characteristic phonetic traits of French. For instance, in the example from the episode 5×05 (see Table 15), one could use the word joke pronounced as /ʒəʊk/ also in the German version. It is an Anglicism recognised in the German language. In the same example in the Polish rendition (see Table 16), one could translate English joke literally as żart and replace the Polish sound /r/ with the French /ʁ/.

Another solution could be derived in analogy to the sitcom ‘Allo! ‘Allo! which has famously “used a special technique which consisted in representing different languages (mainly French and German) without forsaking the English language other than by including some single words from the represented languages”[5] (Zabalbeascoa 2014: 29; translation K.P.). One could, thus, add some words pronounced in an unusual way into the translation, as was done, very successfully, in the case of the British show and its translations.

Alternatively, the translators could try depicting e. g. Canadian raising with the help of target-language vocabulary featuring similar sounds, such as the noun auto both in Polish and in German, or the interjection au (German) / aua (Polish) ‘ouch’. Such comments as cited in Table 1 and 2 (You pronounce the word X, *this way*) would be a clear indication also for target-language viewers that they are subjected to accent-related joke.

It is important to note three things. First, sitcoms are comedy series whose primary task is to make the viewers laugh.[6] Second, Canadian-related jokes are a recurring theme in How I Met Your Mother that can be considered one of the characteristics of the show. Translators should aim at preserving both of these distinctive features in their target texts in some way. However, the examples from the corpus clearly showed that this was not done consistently in the analysed translations. Third, sitcoms make use of canned laughter that is a clear indication of potentially humorous character of a given utterance/conversation. Omitting a joke and preserving the original laugh track[7] sends a signal to the target viewers that the translation is not adequate.

The figure below indicates the distribution of the translation techniques implemented by the Polish and German translators. It illustrates 11 techniques because each part of the example depicted in Tables 13 and 14 is accounted for separately.

Figure 1. Techniques used to render phonetic jokes in How I Met Your Mother

It is rather evident that only the German translators tried to substitute the original joke with a different joke in the target language. In that rendition, there are two cultural jokes and three puns. However, all the other cases were paraphrased. In the Polish version, there seem to be no jokes created by the translators. One could assume that the colloquial paraphrase was meant as a joke, but the set up and the punchline are not coherent making this passage more surprising than funny (see Table 12). As it was already said, many of the discussed fragments are part of bigger jokes which means that the comedic character of the sitcom is not entirely lost in the translation. Nevertheless, the number of individual jokes decreases in the target-language versions.

When it comes to the Canadian references, they were rendered in three out of ten cases in the German translation, and partially only once in the Polish text. It seems that this theme was, unfortunately, disregarded to the target viewers’ disadvantage.

References

Baños Piñero, Rocío, and Frederic Chaume (2009) “Prefabricated orality: a challenge in audiovisual translation”, inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia,
URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/Prefabricated_Orality (accessed 11 October 2017).

Blake, Marc (2014) How to be a Sitcom Writer: Secrets from the Inside, Luton, Andrews UK Limited.

Butsch, Richard. (2008) “Five Decades and Three Hundred Sitcoms about Class and Gender” in Thinking Outside the Box: A Contemporary Television Genre Reader, Gary R. Edgerton and Brian G. Rose (eds), Lexington, The University of Kentucky: 111-35.

Chiaro, Delia (1992) The Language of Jokes: Analysing Verbal Play, London/New York, Routledge.

Corrius, Montse, and Patrick Zabalbeascoa (2011) “Language variation in source texts and their translations: The case of L3 in film translation”, Target International Journal of Translation Studies, 23(1): 113-30.

Deutsche Synchronkartei (no data). URL: https://www.synchronkartei.de/serie/12406 (accessed 11 May 2017).

Dore, Margherita (2008) The Audiovisual Translation of Humour: Dubbing the First Series of the TV Comedy Programme Friends into Italian. URL: http://tiny.cc/fe18hz (accessed 7 October 2017).

Doroszewski, Witold (ed) (1969) Słownik języka polskiego. URL: https://sjp.pwn.pl/doroszewski/gadac;5429144.html (accessed 18 October 2017).

Forever Dreaming (no data). URL: http://transcripts.foreverdreaming.org (accessed 11 May 2017).

Hamilton, Sandra (1997) Canadianisms and their treatment in dictionaries. URL: http://www.dico.uottawa.ca/theses/hamilton/hamilton2.htm (accessed 13 May 2017).

How I Met Your Mother (no data). URL: http://himym.co (accessed 29 October 2017).

Mills, Brett (2009) The Sitcom, Edinburgh, Edinburgh University Press.

Mintz, Lawrence E. (1985) “Situation Comedy” in TV Genres: A Handbook and Reference Guide, Brian G. Rose (ed.), Westport/London, Greenwood Press: 105-129.

Mittell, Jason (2004) Genre and Television: From Cop Shows to Cartoons in American Culture, New York and London, Routledge.

Quaglio, Paulo (2009) Television dialogue: The sitcom Friends vs. natural conversation. Studies in corpus linguistics Vol. 36. Amsterdam and Philadelphia, John Benjamins.

Sedita, Scott (2006) The Eight Characters of Comedy: A Guide to Sitcom Acting and Writing, Los Angeles, Atides Publishing.

Smith, Evan S. (1999) Writing Television Sitcoms, New York, Perigee Books.

Zabalbeascoa, Patrick (1994) “Factors in dubbing television comedy”, Perspectives: Studies in Translatology, 2 (1): 89-99.

---- (2014) “La combinación de lenguas como mecanismo de humor y problema de traducción audiovisual” in Translating Humour in Audiovisual Texts, Gian Luigi De Rosa, Francesca Bianchi, Antonella De Laurentiis, Elisa Perego (eds), Bern, Peter Lang: 25-47.

Audiovisual materials

Episode

Original script

German version

Polish version

1×09 Belly Full of Turkey

Chris Miller and Phil Lord

Christian Langhagen,

Norbert Steinke

Elżbieta Gałązka-Salamon

2×09 Slap Bet

Kourtney Kang

Jacek Mikina

3×09 Slapsgiving

Matt Kuhn

3×16 Sandcastles in the Sand

Kourtney Kang

4×11 Little Minnesota

Chuck Tatham

Błażej Grzegorz Kubacki

5×05 Dual Citizenship

Jacek Mikina

6×09 Glitter

Kourtney Kang

Błażej Grzegorz Kubacki

7×08 The Slutty Pumpkin Returns

Tami Sagher

Błażej Kubacki

8×15 P.S. I Love You

Carter Bays & Craig Thomas

[no data]

Notes

[1] The language of sitcoms and its pretended ‘naturalness’ are discussed for example by Baños Piñero and Chaume (2009) as well as Quaglio (2009).

[2] The term ‘third language’ in this sense should not be confused with the one used in the foreign language teaching.

[3] The names of the authors of original scripts and translations are listed at the end of this paper. The transcripts of the original dialogues were taken from the website http://transcripts.foreverdreaming.org (accessed 11 May 2017). Their formatting and wording may have been modified. The names of the original script authors were taken from the website http://himym.co (accessed 29 October 2017). The names of the German translators were taken from the website https://www.synchronkartei.de/serie/12406 (accessed 11 May 2017). The names of the Polish translators were read out at the end of the episode by the voice-over speaker.

[4] For an interesting description of slips of the tongue as a source of comedy cf. Chiaro (1992: 17-24).

[5] ‘[…] ’Allo ’Allo utiliza una técnica especial que consiste en representar diversos idiomas (francés y alemán, principalmente) sin salirse del inglés más que para incluir alguna palabra aislada de los idiomas representados.’ (Zabalbeascoa 2014: 29).

[6] The role of humour in comedies is discussed, among others, by Zabalbeascoa (1994: 95), Mittell (2004: 8), and Mills (2009: 49).

[7] Sometimes translators delete the laugh track for various reasons, cf. e.g. Dore (2008: 100-102).

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"The translatability of accent humour: Canadian English in How I Met Your Mother"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2463

‘Mr Treehorn treats objects like women, man’:

A map of drug-induced language variation in cinema and its translation

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Abstract & Keywords

Much research has been conducted on the translation of language variation and marked speech in its various forms, as proved by this 4th special issue on the translation of dialects in multimedia. There is one variety, however, which seems to have been broadly overlooked in translation studies so far, which I have previously referred to as disorderly speech or DIS (Parra López 2016): drug-induced language variation. This concept arises from the need to account for a particular, though widespread phenomenon in audiovisual fiction, that is, the portrayal of the effects of intoxication on a character’s linguistic output.

The present article relies on L3 theory (Corrius and Zabalbeascoa 2011; Zabalbeascoa 2012) to analyse instances of DIS found in English-language films including Almost Famous (Bryce, Crowe, and Crowe 2000), Blazing Saddles (Hertzberg and Brooks 1974), and Leaving Las Vegas (Figgis 1995) and their dubbed and subtitled versions in Spanish. A detailed study of these instances shows that intoxication can have a broad range of effects on characters depending on its stylistic, narrative, or characterising functions and that the translation of DIS is far from straightforward.

Further research on this new realisation and its interplay with other semiotic modes in audiovisual texts would be useful to both film and translation studies. While the former could explore the different resources film offers t0 portray intoxication, the latter could benefit from the depiction of DIS to understand how it can be recreated in other languages.

Keywords: alcohol, drugs, dubbing, subtitling, disorderly speech, dialect, language variation, cinema

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"‘Mr Treehorn treats objects like women, man’: A map of drug-induced language variation in cinema and its translation"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2462

1. Introduction

This study departs from the premise that, the same way that behaviour, facial expression, and body language can act as indices of intoxication in persons under the influence (PUIs), it is also possible to identify them through the way they verbally express themselves. Alcohol and drugs often affect the speech of PUIs in a way that, without being necessarily universal, can be easily identified by most observers, especially when an actor or actress exaggerates them as part of an impersonation (Andrews, Cox, and Smith 1977; Hollien, DeJong, Martin 1998). In previous publications, I have referred to this phenomenon as disorderly speech or DIS (Parra López 2016), and it constitutes a common translation problem that is frequently obviated in translation research.

The present article analyses several instances of DIS found in a wide range of English-language films with significant substance use and their dubbed and subtitled versions in Spanish. The goal is to explore the different ways in which DIS is portrayed in STs and how this portrayal may have an impact on audiovisual translation, so films have been selected on the basis of the features they display, rather than the extratextual factors surrounding them.

2. The nature of disorderly speech

I use the term disorderly speech to refer to the fictional representation of any functional speech disorder (Bloodstein 1979: 6-7) that temporarily affects characters’ language, articulation, voice, or fluency. Apart from substance intoxication, which will be the focal point of this article, DIS can be caused by different factors, including lack of sleep, trauma, or psychological instability (Parra López 2016). Despite borrowing part of the terminology from other scientific disciplines such as psychology, psychiatry, neurology, or pharmacology, for the study of audiovisual translation, it is necessary to draw a division between reality and fiction.

Cinema is governed by the rules and limitations of the medium and is exploited accordingly to the style and intention of each filmmaker. This means that the representation of characters under the influence (CUIs) is often variable and unpredictable and may or may not be meant to evoke reality. In this respect, DIS is comparable to other types of language variation or phenomena such as multilingualism (Parra López 2014; Parra López 2016). Hence the following reflection by Sternberg (1981: 235) also applies:

The realistic force of polylingual representation, like that of the text's simulacrum of reality as a whole, is relatively independent of the objective (verbal and extraverbal) facts as viewed and established by scientific inquiry. What is artistically more crucial than linguistic reality is the model(s) of that reality as internally patterned or invoked by the individual work and/or conventionally fashioned by the literary tradition and/or conceived of by the [viewer] within the given cultural framework.

To avoid reference to specific languages or varieties and to analyse the problem of language variation and multilingualism with higher abstraction, Corrius and Zabalbeascoa (2011) propose L3-theory, further developed in later publications (Zabalbeascoa 2012; Zabalbeascoa and Corrius in press; Zabalbeascoa and Voellmer 2015). The authors distinguish the main language(s) of the source text (ST), which they term L1, from the main language(s) of the target text (TT), or L2, and any other identifiable language or variety: L3. Depending on the version of the text where it appears, they introduce a further distinction between the L3 present in the ST (that is, L3ST) and the L3 that is used in the TT (L3TT).

Following this framework, DIS found in source films would be one type of L3ST, generally L1-based, that may or may not be rendered in the translation. However, before discussing potential translation solutions, it is necessary to understand the possibilities fiction offers for the representation of this phenomenon. What follows is an adaptation of Sternberg’s (1981: 223-32) categories for the fictional representation of multilingualism, which I have applied to the study of DIS. Categories are ordered from greatest to least presence of L3:

  • Vehicular matching: This representation technique consists in the use of real speech defects and disorders without any filters and in all the circumstances in which they would occur naturally. That is, CUIs always talk as such. This may be the case, for example, of documentaries or of certain films in which method acting has gone further than usual. Perhaps the most striking and extreme example of this practice can be found in The Drunk Series (Wilson and Persson 2013), in which all the characters are played by visibly drunk actors and actresses who represent a script that was also written by PUIs. In fact, DIS is so present in the series that it could be considered as the L1.
  • Selective representation: In this case, speech defects and disorders are also shown as such. The difference with respect to vehicular matching is that this kind of speech is limited to specific occasions (selective matching) and appears in combination with unmarked interventions in L1 (selective leveling).
  • Verbal transposition: Instead of including actual speech defects and disorders, they are evoked (Bleichenbacher 2008: 59) in the text through the use of certain markers (Chin and Pisoni 1997) that give rise to DIS. These are also referred to in the literature as affective or symptomatic indices (Abercrombie 1967: 9; Lyons 1977: 108), cues (Gottschalk, Gleser, and Springer 1963; Scherer 2003) or triggers (Fowler 2000: 34; Guillot 2012). They can be specific to DIS or belong to another language or language variety, as long as their appearance is attributable to a CUI. The latter option would be the case, for instance, of a speaker whose foreign or dialectal traits are exaggerated after drinking alcohol as a symptom of disinhibition, as happens in the film Beerfest (Gerber, Perello, and Chandrasekhar 2006).
  • Explicit attribution: Instead of representing the influence through changes in the speech of characters, who express themselves in the L1, other strategies are used: the explicit mention of the alteration, the utterance of drug-related puns, or a whole range of resources from any of the meaning-making modes of the audiovisual text, such as image, sound, music or editing (Pérez-González 2014; Stöckl 2004). This practice is also conventionally adopted in subtitling for the deaf and the hard of hearing (Zdenek 2015: 250-4), where the manner of speaking is specified in the identifiers (that is, the notes in brackets) preceding dialogue.
  • Homogenising convention: Despite the use of disorder-inducing substances in the film, there is no trace of their effects, neither in the form of DIS or any other L3 nor by any other means.

The first three categories, in which some form of L3 is used, represent what Deleuze (1994: 107-8) called ‘to do it’, as opposed to ‘say[ing] it without doing it’, which would correspond to Sternberg’s explicit attribution. What these strategies offer in terms of richness and convincing portrayal, they sacrifice in comprehensibility, and vice versa (Bleichenbacher 2008: 173; Kozloff 2000: 80). For this reason, when representing the effects of alcohol or drugs in cinema, it is most common to avoid the extremes and opt for solutions in the middle of the spectrum, especially through the use of verbal transposition.

3. Alcohol and drugs in cinema

Judging by the scarce attention it has received in the fields of linguistics and translation, one could consider DIS as a peripheral phenomenon, as peculiar as it is exceptional. However, studies on the influence of alcohol and drugs in cinematic characters prove the exact opposite: 79 percent of top-grossing American films from 1985 to 1995 show one or more lead characters using alcohol (Everett, Schnuth, and Tribble 1998). This trend has remained at 83 percent after the change of century (Dal Cin et al. 2008) and only drops to figures around 50 percent in the case of films for all audiences (Dal Cin et al. 2008; Goldstein, Sobel, and Newman 1999; Thompson and Yokota 2001).

Regarding studies on the use of illegal substances by cinematic characters, Markert (2013) offers one of the most recent and complete overviews. In an appendix, it includes an exhaustive list of films and TV-series that have depicted any form of substance abuse between 1960 and 2010: cannabis appears in 194; morphine and heroin, in 217; cocaine and crack, in 187; hallucinogenics, in 92; methamphetamine, in 27, and ecstasy, in 23.

Logically, these data do not imply that a character is necessarily shown under the influence in all the titles above, but they do allow us to understand the potential scope of the phenomenon in cinema.

4. A typology of DIS markers: some examples and their translation

When resorting to verbal transposition for the portrayal of CUI’s, filmmakers have at their disposal a wide array of markers from any linguistic level: phonetic, morphological, lexical-semantic, syntactic, pragmatic, and conversational. Many of these are nonspecific symptoms and take the form of errors that any speaker could make in spontaneous speech, but it is their calculated use in fictional dialogue, in certain circumstances and in combination with other verbal and non-verbal elements, which identifies them as markers of CUIs. Below is a selection of examples from each of the linguistic levels taken from several English-language films where substance use plays a plot-significant role. All examples are accompanied by their Spanish translation in the dubbed (TTD) and subtitled (TTS) versions.

4.1. Phonetic markers

One of the first symptoms of PUIs tends to be irregular articulation, which frequently results in such phonetic phenomena as elision, substitution, or lengthening of sounds (Sobell and Sobell 1972; Lester and Skousen 1974; Trojan and Kryspin-Exner 1968). In the following example from Leaving Las Vegas (Cazès et al. 1995), the protagonist, who is an alcoholic, is thinking aloud with a tape recorder in his hand while standing in a queue at the bank.

ST

BEN

The<n> I could fall in love with you, because the<n> I would have a purpose: to clean you up. And that, THA<T>… would prove that I’m worth something.

TTD

BEN

Entonces, podría enamorarme de ti, porque, entonces, tendría un buen motivo para limpiarte, y eso, E<S>O… demostraría que sirvo para algo.

TTS

BEN

creo que me enamoraría de ti

*

porque tendría un objetivo: / limpiarte toda.

*

Y eso…

*

demostraría que valgo algo.

Example 1. Consonant lengthening. Leaving Las Vegas (Cazès et al. 1995)

As can be seen in example 1, Ben tends to lengthen consonant sounds (in angle brackets), especially in word-end position. Unlike the lengthening of vowel sounds, which is also common in unaffected speech, this misarticulation is almost exclusive of PUIs (Lester and Skousen 1974). The dubbed version of the film has adapted this feature (in the sense of Corrius and Zabalbeascoa 2011, 8) only in the most marked of the three occurrences, probably to achieve lip-sync with the exaggerated mouth movements of the actor. Given the difficulty –and often reluctance– of rendering phonetic features in writing, the consonant lengthening has been neutralized in the subtitles and replaced by an ellipsis.

Neutralisation, however, is not the only option implemented by subtitlers dealing with a phonetic DIS marker, as shown in example 2, from Bad Boys II (Bruckheimer and Bay 2003). Detectives Marcus Burnett and Mike Lowrey uncover a drug-smuggling operation and decide to pay a visit to Captain Howard to tell him about their discovery. Marcus has accidentally ingested ecstasy during their mission and is visibly affected. When they arrive, he greets the Captain.

ST

MARCUS

Hell<o>, cap-tiown. [captain]

TTD

MARCUS

Hol<a>… capi-ti<e>un! [capitán]

TTS

MARCUS

Hola…

*

“capitiáun”. [capitán]

Example 2. Sound interjection. Bad Boys II (Bruckheimer and Bay 2003)

Instead of addressing his superior as captain, pronounced /'kæptɪn/, Marcus pauses after the first syllable and interjects two vowel sounds in the second, which could be approximately transcribed as cap-tiown [kæp tɪ'oʊn]. Whereas both Mike and the audience are already aware of Marcus as CUI, Captain Howard is not, and they do not want him to find out, so the exaggerated pronunciation has a comical effect in the scene. Perhaps this is why both translated versions adapt the DIS marker by recreating the anomaly with the Spanish word for captain, that is, capitán. The non-standard spelling is highlighted in the subtitles through the use of quotation marks. Sound lengthening, as in the first example, is not transcribed as such but could be considered somehow implicit in the ellipsis.

4.2. Morphological markers

As CUIs feel less inhibited, they are also prone to experiment and be creative with language. On the morphological level, this disposition takes the form of neologistic or irregular practices in the formation and inflexion of words. In A Few Best Men (Barnard et al. 2011), Barbara snorts cocaine and drinks too much alcohol during her daughter’s wedding, which results in her misbehaving during most of the ceremony. At one point, she approaches her new son-in-law (example 3).

ST

BARBARA

You are not a real member of this family until you have macarenaed with your mother-in-law.

TTD

BARBARA

No serás un verdadero miembro de esta familia hasta que macarenees con tu suegra.

You won’t be a real member of this family until you macarena with your mother-in-law.

TTS

BARBARA

No serás miembro de esta familia

You won’t be a member of this family

*

hasta que bailes la Macarena / con tu suegra.

until you dance the Macarena / with your mother-in-law.

Example 3. Neologistic derivation. A Few Best Men (Barnard et al. 2011)

By inflecting the Spanish proper noun Macarena, famously known for the homonymous song, as if it were a verb, Barbara creates a neologism with a precise meaning: dancing to the song ‘Macarena’. The same is done in the dubbed version, where becomes the verb macarenear and is conjugated accordingly. Remarkably, the subtitler opts for a longer, more conventional solution: the neologism is replaced by its literal meaning, dancing the Macarena.

Neologistic strategies, however, can also lead —and often do— to ill-formed words. In the following example from Billy Madison (Simonds and Davis 1995), Billy is drunk and begins to chase a man-size imaginary penguin, who seems to flee in terror. Eventually, he corners the penguin (example 4).

ST

BILLY

All the people at the zoo are very nice, penguin. They’ll treat you real respectable-like.

TTD

BILLY

Todos los que trabajan en el zoo son buena gente, pingüino. Ya verás como te tratan de maravilla.

All those who work at the zoo are good people, penguin. You’ll see that they’ll treat you wonderfully.

TTS

BILLY

La gente del zoo es muy maja, pingüino.

The people at the zoo are very nice, penguin.

*

Te van a cuidar como que muy bien.

They’re going to treat you very goodish.

Example 4. Suffix substitution. Billy Madison (Simonds and Davis 1995)

Besides not being very reassuring, the word respectable-like is grammatically ill-formed. It results from adding the suffix -like, which can only be applied to nouns, to the adjective respectable. Most likely, the character intended to use the manner adverb respectably but inadvertently substituted the suffix -ly by -like. Any online search of the word respectable-like refers directly to this film and this particular scene, so its use is distinctly unique. As can be seen in the table, the marker is neutralised in the dubbed version through the use of a conventional adverb phrase: de maravilla (wonderfully). On the other hand, even though the subtitles are grammatically correct, they resort to the colloquial phrase como que to render the unreliability of the speaker.

4.3. Lexical-semantic markers

Lexical selection is also affected by intoxication. PUIs of sedatives, such as alcohol, or similar substances often express themselves vaguely and have trouble choosing the right words for what they want to convey. This is due both to their hampered thinking and their warped perception and cognition (American Psychiatric Association 1994). In example 5, from Arthur (Greenhut and Gordon 1981), the drunk antihero wants to compliment one of his wedding guests for the hat she is wearing, but cannot quite find the word for that piece of clothing.

Speech pathologists refer to this phenomenon as anomia (Bloodstein 1979: 372). Even though it is usually a symptom of aphasia and other organic mental disorders, it also may appear in PUIs, as in example 5.

ST

ARTHUR

I wonder— could you tell me where the wedding party is?

OLD LADY

Right over there, in that room.

ARTHUR

Oh, thank you very much. You’ve got a lovely uh… hat! Hat. It’s called a hat.

TTD

ARTHUR

Ah, gracias. Muy amable. Lleva usted un precioso sombrero. ¡Anda! Si no es un sombrero, es una pajarera.

Oh, thank you. That’s very kind of you. You’re wearing a beautiful… hat. OOPS! It’s not a hat, it’s an aviary.

TTS

ARTHUR

Muchas gracias. Tiene un bonito…

Thank you very much. You have a beautiful…

*

…¡sombrero! Sombrero. / Se llama un sombrero.

…hat! Hat. / It’s called a hat.

Example 5: Anomia. Arthur (Greenhut and Gordon 1981)

The struggle to find the right word is rendered literally in the subtitles —maybe too literally, as the second subtitle seems like an unnatural word-for-word translation. By contrast, the dubbed version turns anomia into quite a different phenomenon. Arthur finds the word sombrero (hat) without much difficulty, but immediately realises his apparent mistake and corrects himself: ‘Oops! It’s not a hat, it’s an aviary’.

One explanation for this absurd comment may be the similarity between the Spanish word for aviary, pajarera, and the type of hat the lady is wearing, which is a pamela (picture hat). In that case, the problem would be the signifier, as the CUI would be able to recognise the object, despite misnaming it. Another possibility would be that Arthur’s perception is so heavily under the influence that he cannot tell whether the lady is wearing a hat or an aviary, thus resorting to agnosia (see Ayd Jr. 2000, 16) and, even worse, his warped cognition leads him to believe that the latter is a plausible option (see Parra López 2014: 34-5 for further information).

Another lexical-semantic marker of DIS can be what in psychology and psychiatry is known as clanging or clang association: ‘Speech in which sounds, rather than meaningful conceptual relationships, govern word choice’ (Ayd Jr. 2000: 191). This is illustrated in example 6.

ST

PENNY LANE

You know that I’m retired. I’ve always been. I’m retired, and I’m tired.

TTD

PENNY LANE

Sabes que estoy retirada. Lo he estado siempre. Estoy retirada y tirada.

You know that I’m retired. I’ve always been. I’m retired and I’m lying.

TTS

PENNY LANE

Ya lo sabes. / Estoy retirada.

You know already. / I’m retired.

*

Lo he estado siempre. / Estoy retirada y tirada.

I’ve always been. / I’m retired and I’m lying.

Example 6. Clang association. Almost Famous (Bryce et al. 2000)

Penny Lane has ingested a mixture of methaqualone (‘quaaludes’) and alcohol and is clearly a CUI, to the point that her speech is not guided by the logical relations between the ideas, but by the sonority of the words retired and tired, which are paronyms. In this case, the phenomenon could also be considered a simple pun, with the peculiarity that Penny can barely stand and her choice of words seems rather unconscious. Interestingly, the two Spanish versions choose to preserve the association, translating tired as tirada (lying). Thus, the similarity between the words retirada and tirada has been prioritised in the translation over the literal meaning of tired, that is, cansada.

4.4. Syntactic markers

This category includes various phenomena, such as word omissions, lack of agreement, anacolutha, and other syntactic ungrammaticalities. In the following conversation from The Big Lebowski (Coen and Coen 1998), the CUI has been arrested and taken to the police station after being found running down the street under the influence of a hallucinogenic substance. Unfortunately for him, the effects still linger and his response to the officer’s accusations, far from exculpating him, are further incriminating.

ST

POLICE OFFICER

Mr Treehorn said he had to eject you from his garden party. That you were drunk and abusive.

LEBOWSKI

Mr Treehorn treats objects like women, man!

TTD

LEBOWSKI

El Sr. Treehorn trata a los objetos como si fueran mujeres, tío.

Mr Treehorn treats objects as if they were women, man.

TTS

LEBOWSKI

El Sr. Treehorn trata los objetos / como a mujeres, tío.

Mr Treehorn treats objects / like women, man.

Example 7. Word interchange. The Big Lebowski (Coen and Coen 1998)

Lebowski accidentally interchanges the elements of the comparison, conveying the exact opposite of what he meant. A simple literal translation of the lapsus linguae has sufficed to maintain the marker and its humorous effect in both Spanish versions.

Example 8 is a sequence from Taking Woodstock (Costas et al. 2009), a film about the historic festival that took place in 1969 in White Lake. Elliot, one of the organisers, is talking to two hippies he has just met beside their classic VW van. Although the audience cannot know whether they are CUIs during the conversation, they are in possession of LSD and seem to use it regularly, which would explain their eccentric style of speaking.

ST

ELLIOT

I’m from here.

HIPPIE 1

You’re from here, man.

HIPPIE 2

That’s so cool.

ELLIOT

I guess so.

HIPPIE 1

Man, you’re… amazingly from here.

TTD

HIPPIE 1

Tío, eres impresionantemente de aquí.

Man, you’re… amazingly from here

TTS

HIPPIE 1

Tío, eres impresionantemente de aquí.

Man, you’re… amazingly from here

Example 8. Anomalous modification. Taking Woodstock (Costas et al. 2009)

The use of amazingly in this example probably strikes the viewer as rather peculiar, because it is used as a degree adverb of the prepositional phrase from here, which seems to function as a non-gradable adverb. If we were to modify from here with any other degree adverb, the resulting sentence is likely to sound odd too: very from here, too from here, and so on. The conventional use of amazingly in this context would be as a manner adverb modifying the whole sentence, in which case it would have to precede or follow the rest of the constituents: ‘Amazingly, you’re from here’ or ‘You’re from here, amazingly’.

Both Spanish versions of this scene have opted for the adverb impresionantemente in the same position and for the same purpose, thus preserving the syntactical DIS marker. In fact, both versions are nearly identical throughout the scene, which suggests that the subtitles may have been made from the translation for dubbing, as is often the case in the industry (Ferrer Simó 2012: 166). As straightforward as the adopted solution may seem, it is important to keep in mind that other options are always available. This is evidenced in the French dubbed version of the film, in example 9, where the DIS marker is nowhere to be found.

TTS

HIPPIE 1

Non, moi je trouve que c’est prodigieux de pouvoir être d’ici.

No, I think it’s prodigious that you can be from here.

 

Example 9. Neutralised French translation. Taking Woodstock (Costas et al. 2009)

4.5. Pragmatic markers

Perhaps somewhat more subtle than some of the previous categories, pragmatic markers consist, mainly, in confusions and mistakes related to speech acts, conversational maxims, relevance, politeness, and so on. In the western Blazing Saddles (Hertzberg and Brooks 1974), Bart, the recently elected sheriff, takes up his office, where he meets Jim ‘The Waco Kid’, who has been arrested for being drunk and disorderly. Bart offers Jim some food, but he rejects it and immediately grabs a hidden bottle with two fingers of whisky, which he empties in the blink of an eye. Shocked by his heavy drinking, Bart says the following (example 10).

ST

BART

A man drink like that and he don’t eat, he is going to die.

JIM

When?

TTD

BART

Si un hombre bebe así y no come, acabará por morir.

If a man drinks like that and he doesn’t eat, he’ll end up dying.

JIM

¿Cuándo?

When?

TTS

BART

Un hombre que bebe así / y no come, se va a morir.

A man who drinks like that / and doesn’t eat is going to die.

JIM

¿Cuándo?

When?

Example 10. Misinterpretation of speech acts. Blazing Saddles (Hertzberg and Brooks 1974)

Jim’s answer to Bart’s comment is absurd and unexpected, because he blatantly misinterprets the sheriff’s utterance. With his locutionary act (Austin 1962; Searle 1969), Bart is advising Jim either 1) not to drink that much or 2) if he intends to keep drinking that much, to eat something at least. However, Jim does not interpret the illocutionary act as a piece of advice, but believes that the sheriff is sharing with him his apparently omniscient knowledge. For this reason, his perlocutionary act is not to stop drinking, or to comment on the advice he has just received, but to enquire about his possible death, which he assumes without much worry.

Another example of pragmatic marker would be the one found in the following excerpt from the recent remake of Arthur (Bender et al. 2011). The inveterate drunkard arrives at his lover’s house in the middle of the night and rings the bell. Unexpectedly, her father opens the door.

ST

ARTHUR

Hello, Naomi’s dad. Is your daughter here? Her name is Naomi. Just to clear up any confusion.

TTD

ARTHUR

Hola, padre de Naomi. ¿Está su hija? Se llama Naomi. Para que no haya confusiones.

Hello, Naomi’s dad. Is your daughter here? Her name is Naomi. Just so there isn’t any confusion.

TTS

ARTHUR

Hola, padre de Naomi.

Hello, Naomi’s dad.

*

¿Está su hija?

Is your daughter here?

*

Se llama Naomi. / Para que no haya confusiones.

Her name is Naomi. / Just so there isn’t any confusion.

Example 11. Lack of relevance: overexplanation. Arthur (Bender et al. 2011)

Being a CUI, Arthur is not fully aware of the implications of what he is saying. The fact that he addresses the man as ‘Naomi’s dad’ relies on the presupposition that 1) he has a daughter and 2) her name is Naomi (and not Martha, for example), so the subsequent clarification is not relevant (Wilson and Sperber 2004). Both the dubbed and the subtitled versions of the film (again identical, as in previous examples) maintain the overexplanation without special difficulty.

4.6. Conversational markers

CUIs usually perform badly in conversation; they tend to disregard turn-taking and topic-establishing conventions and to ignore their interlocutor’s turns (Bigham 2002; Weil and Zinberg 1969). In example 12, from the film 54 (Deutchman et al. 1998), the owner of the famous disco Studio 54, Steve Rubell, is lying on his bed surrounded by pills and dollar notes while trying to talk one of his employees into having sex with him.

ST

STEVE

You’re from Iowa or something, right?

GREG

New Jersey.

STEVE

Right. And now you’re rubbing elbows with the most influential people on the planet. Not bad for a kid from, uh— somewhere.

GREG

New Jersey. Thanks.

Example 12. Lack of acknowledgement. 54 (Deutchman et al. 1998)

As can be derived from the excerpt, Steve does not seem to be paying attention to his interlocutor. In fact, he does not seem at all interested in what Greg has to say. He is just pretending to have a conversation with him, instead of the monologue he is actually delivering, to keep Greg in the bedroom with him.

But even if he paid attention, his CUI condition definitely plays a role in the lapse, fictionally portraying an impairment that, in the case of alcohol, has been proven in both PUIs’ attention (see Steele and Josephs 1990; Wallgren and Barry 1970) and short-term memory (see Kalin 1964; Maylor and Rabbitt 1987; Miller and Dolan 1974; Parker et al. 1974; Ryback, Weinert, and Fozard 1970).

Unfortunately, example 12 is from the extended version of the film, which was not available in Spain, so there are no official translations to compare it with. Nonetheless, the example does not appear especially problematic for translation, as a literal rendering would easily preserve the DIS marker.

4.7. Paralinguistic markers

As mentioned at the beginning of section 4, DIS may also affect voice and speech fluency. Going back to Blazing Saddles, there is another scene in which Bart is smoking a joint and offers Jim to take a draw. Jim accepts the offer and, as soon as he exhales and starts to speak, his voice becomes ridiculously high-pitched. After two utterances, it returns gradually to its normal pitch, as the effect of the drug wears off. This is a clear example of how DIS markers can differ from real-life symptoms of substance use, as there is no scientific evidence of cannabis increasing voice fundamental frequency, the acoustic correlate of perceived pitch (Chin and Pisoni 1997).

Jim’s farcical high pitch is not reflected in the subtitles, probably because it can be perceived in the ST dialogue track, but had to be dealt with somehow in dubbing. Interestingly, the voice actor does not maintain the pitch fluctuation, but neither does he neutralise the DIS marker. Instead, he shouts, introducing a fluctuation of loudness that was not in the ST.

ST

JIM

↑ Listen, Bart! ↑ I want you to do me a favour. →

TTD

JIM

¡ESCUCHA, BART! Quiero que me hagas un favor.

TTS

JIM

Escucha, Bart. / Quiero que me hagas un favor.

Example 13. Pitch fluctuation. Blazing Saddles (Hertzberg and Brooks 1974)

Another paralinguistic DIS marker is fluency, which can be judged by the ‘smoothness and continuity’ of speech (Bloodstein 1979, 7). In the following example from In Bruges (Broadbent et al. 2008), Ray has just sniffed one gram of coke and feels restless and overstimulated. When his partner, Ken, asks him about a date, Ray responds with a monologue.

ST

KEN

How’d your date go?

RAY

My date involved two instances of extreme violence. One instance of her hand on my cock and my finger up her thing, which lasted all too briefly. Isn’t that always the way? One instance of me stealing five grams of her very-high-quality cocaine, and one instance of me blinding a poofy little skinhead. So, all in all, my evening pretty much balanced out fine.

64 w

360 c

15 s

KEN

You got five grams of coke?

RAY

No, four grams on me and one gram in me, which is why my heart is going like the clappers, as if I’m about to have a heart attack. So if I collapse any minute now, please remember to tell the doctors that it might have something to do with the coke.

52 w

249 c

7.5 s

Example 14. Pressure of speech in the ST. In Bruges (Broadbent et al. 2008)

The scientific term (in PUIs) for this is pressure of speech, which consists of ‘speech that is increased in amount, accelerated, and difficult or impossible to interrupt’ (Valciukas 1995: 276). In fact, Ray talks so fast that his speech is difficult not only to interrupt but even to understand. In his first turn, he utters 64 words (a total of 360 characters) in 15 s, and in his next, 52 in barely 7.5 s. This gives an increased speaking rate of 256 wpm and 416 wpm, respectively, way over the average conversation rate of 150 wpm (National Center for Voice and Speech 2011). Example 15 shows both translated versions.

TTD

KEN

¿Qué tal tu cita?

RAY

Mi cita incluyó dos episodios violentos, uno con su mano en mi polla y mi dedo en su cosa, aunque demasiado breve. Como siempre. Y el otro caso robándole cinco gramos de su cocaína de calidad y dejar ciego a un marica skinhead. Así que, en general, la velada no me ha ido tan mal.

55 w

280 c

15 s

KEN

¿Llevas cinco gramos?

RAY

Cuatro encima y uno dentro, por eso voy a cien y está a punto de darme un ataque cardíaco. Así que, si me derrumbo, recuerda decirles a los médicos que podría estar relacionado con la coca.

36 w

189 c

7,5 s

TTS

KEN

¿Qué tal tu cita?

RAY

Mi cita incluyó dos episodios violentos,

* [40 c / 2.04 s]

uno con su mano en mi polla / y mi dedo en su cosa,

* [48 c / 1.92 s]

aunque demasiado breve. Como siempre.

* [37 c / 2.60 s]

Otro robándole cinco gramos / de su cocaína de calidad

* [51 c / 3.12 s]

y otro dejando ciego a un marica skinhead.

* [42 c / 2.00 s]

Así que, en general, / la velada no me ha ido tan mal.

   [51 c / 3.00 s]

56 w

269 c

14.68 s

KEN

¿Llevas cinco gramos?

RAY

Cuatro encima y uno dentro,

* [27 c / 1.56 s]

por eso voy a cien y está a punto

* [33 c / 1.20 s]

de darme un ataque cardíaco.

* [28 c / 1.16 s]

Si me derrumbo, / recuerda decirles a los médicos

* [46 c / 2.04 s]

que podría ser la coca.

   [23 c / 1.50 s]

33 w

157 c

7.46 s

Example 15. Pressure of speech in the TT. In Bruges (Broadbent et al. 2008)

It is not surprising to verify that the word rate in the subtitles is slightly lower in the first turn (229 wpm) and significantly lower in the second (266 wpm), when Ray’s speech accelerates. This is due to reading speed limitations inherent to the subtitling process, which the subtitler tried to comply with by keeping the dialogue between 18 and 21 cps (characters per second). A literal rendering of the ST dialogue would have required an impossible reading speed of over 30 cps.

What is surprising, though, is to see that the speaking rates in the dubbed version are closer to the ones in the subtitles than to those of the ST: 220 wpm for the first turn and 288 wpm for the second. Taking into account the mode difference, one could have presumed the exact opposite. Even looking at the character count, as it could be argued that words in Spanish tend to be longer than in English, the difference is notable. As there is no such thing as a reading limitation in dubbing, this finding could be due to a mere convention or to the practical and technical difficulties of achieving lip-synch at such high speaking rates.

In any case, it seems clear that both translated versions are considerably more accessible to viewers than the ST since they reduce dialogue content. As a result, they partially dilute the overwhelming effect of fluency as a DIS marker for the sake of intelligibility.

5. Conclusions

Drugs and alcohol are much more present in cinema than they may appear, as are their manifestations. Although filmmakers have different options at their disposal for portraying a CUI, verbal transposition is a common choice due to its versatility. As a fictional representation of real speech disorders, it relies on a whole range of scripted linguistic and paralinguistic markers to evoke the alteration: phonetic, morphological, lexical-semantic, syntactic, pragmatic, and conversational. These DIS (or L3) markers can be used both in the ST and the TT within a dialogue that is otherwise in the L1/L2 and in combination with other verbal and non-verbal elements.

The included examples and their translations, far from being representative of any underlying norm in the industry, are just illustrative of the diverse resources that can be used in cinema and some of the solutions that have been found in dubbing and subtitling. As can be observed throughout the article, not all types of markers entail the same degree of difficulty for translators. For instance, whereas pragmatic and conversational DIS markers can be easily maintained through a literal rendering, other types require more creativity, such as lexical-semantic markers, or are widely neutralized, as tends to happen with morphological features. There are also differences in the way both translation modes deal with DIS markers, which is especially prominent at the phonetic and paralinguistic levels.

Despite its limitations, this paper intends to be a stepping-stone towards a theoretical and systematic description of DIS that would certainly benefit audiovisual translators: firstly, by raising awareness of the phenomenon and its potential manifestations in translation, and secondly, by providing them with a reliable source to justify challenging solutions. Due to space restrictions, it has not been possible to make an in-depth analysis of the relationship between the verbal component and the remaining semiotic modes of the audiovisual text, such as image, sound, music, or editing (Pérez-González 2014; Stöckl 2004). However, it is undeniable that these modes play an essential role in the representation of the influence and will be addressed in future publications.

References

Abercrombie, David (1967) Elements of general phonetics, Edinburgh, Edinburgh University Press.

American Psychiatric Association (1994) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., Washington DC, American Psychiatric Association.

Andrews, Moya L., W. Miles Cox, and Raymond G. Smith (1977) “Effects of alcohol on the speech of non-alcoholics”, Central States Speech Journal 28, no. 2: 140-3. http://doi.org/10.1080/10510977709367933

Austin, John L. (1962) How to do things with words, Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Ayd Jr., Frank J. (2000) Lexicon of psychiatry, neurology and the neurosciences (2nd ed.), Philadelphia, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins.

Bigham, Douglas S. (2002) “Dude, What Was I Talking about?” A New Sociolinguistic Framework for Marijuana-Intoxicated Speech,” Texas Linguistics Forum 45: 11–21. doi:10.1.1.522.4758.

Bleichenbacher, Lukas (2008) Multilingualism in the movies: Hollywood characters and their language choices, Tübingen, Francke.

Bloodstein, Oliver (1979) Speech pathology: An introduction, Boston, Houghton Mifflin.

Chin, Steven B., and David B. Pisoni (1997) Alcohol and speech, San Diego (CA), Academic Press.

Corrius, Montse, and Patrick Zabalbeascoa (2011) “Language variation in source texts and their translations: The case of L3 in film translation”, Target: International Journal of Translation Studies 23, no. 1: 113-30. http://doi.org/10.1075/target.23.1.07zab

Dal Cin, Sonya, Keilah A. Worth, Madeline A. Dalton, and James D. Sargent (2008) “Youth exposure to alcohol use and brand appearances in popular contemporary movies”, Addiction 103, no. 12: 1925-32. http://doi.org/10.1111/j.1360-0443.2008.02304.x

Deleuze, Gilles (1994) “He Stuttered” in Gilles Deleuze and the Theater of Philosophy, Constantin V. Boundas and Dorothea Olkowski (eds), New York and London, Routledge: 23-9.

Everett, Sherry A., Rae L. Schnuth, and Joanne L. Tribble (1998) “Tobacco and alcohol use in top-grossing American films”, Journal of Community Health 23, no. 4: 317-24. http://doi.org/10.1023/A:1018727606500

Ferrer Simó, María (2012) “La traducción audiovisual: un recorrido por quince años en la profesión” in Reflexiones sobre la traducción audiovisual: tres espectros, tres momentos, Juan José Martínez Sierra (ed.), Valencia, Universitat de València: 161-77.

Fowler, Roger (2000) “Orality and the theory of mode in advertisements” in Changing landscapes in language and language pedagogy: Text, orality and voice, Marie-Noëlle Guillot and Marie-Madeleine Kenning (eds), London, CILT Publications: 26-39.

Goldstein, Adam O., Rachel A. Sobel, and Glen R. Newman (1999) “Tobacco and acohol use in G-rated children’s animated films”, Journal of the American Medical Association 281, no. 12: 1131-6. http://doi.org/10.1001/jama.281.12.1131

Gottschalk, Louis A., Goldine C. Gleser, and Kayla J. Springer (1963) “Three hostility scales applicable to verbal samples”, Archives of General Psychiatry 9, no. 3: 254-79.

Guillot, Marie-Noëlle (2012) “Stylisation and representation in subtitles: can less be more?”, Perspectives: Studies in Translation Theory and Practice 20, no. 4: 479-94. http://doi.org/10.1080/0907676X.2012.695379

Hollien, Harry, Gea DeJong, and Camilo A. Martin (1998) “Production of intoxication states by actors: Perception by lay listeners”, Journal of Forensic Sciences 43, no. 6: 1153-62.

Kalin, Rudolf (1964) “Effect of alcohol on memory”, Journal of Abnormal and Social Psychology 69, 635-41.

Kozloff, Sarah (2000) Overhearing film dialogue, Berkeley, University of California Press.

Lester, L., and Skousen, R. (1974) “The phonology of drunkenness” in Papers from the Parasession on Natural Phonology, Anthony Bruck, Robert A. Fox, and Michael W. Lagaly (eds), Chicago, Chicago Linguistics Society: 233-9.

Lyons, John (1977) Semantics, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Markert, John (2013) Hooked in film: Substance abuse on the big screen, Lanham (MD), Scarecrow Press.

Maylor, Elizabeth A., and Patrick Rabbitt (1987) “Effect of alcohol on rate of forgetting”, Psychopharmacology 91, no. 2: 230-5.

Miller, Loren L., and Michael P. Dolan (1974) “Effects of alcohol on short term memory as measured by a guessing technique”, Psychopharmacology 35, no. 4: 353-64.

National Center for Voice and Speech (2011) “Voice Qualities”,

URL: http://www.ncvs.org/ncvs/tutorials/voiceprod/tutorial/quality.html (accessed 20 July 2018)

Parker, Elizabeth S., Ronald L. Alkana, Isabel M. Birnbaum, Joellen T. Hartley, and Ernest P. Noble (1974) “Alcohol and the disruption of cognitive processes”, Archives of General Psychiatry 31, no. 6: 824-8.

Parra López, Guillermo (2014) “El lenguaje alterado y su traducción: miedo y asco entre letras” [Master’s degree thesis], Pompeu Fabra University (UPF), Barcelona, URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10230/22797 (accessed 7 May 2015).

Parra López, Guillermo (2016) “Disorderly speech and its translation: Fear and loathing among letters” in Achieving consilience: Translation theories and practice, Margherita Dore (ed.), Cambridge, Cambridge Scholars Publishing: 82-107.

Pérez-González, Luis (2014) “Multimodality in translation studies: Theoretical and methodological perspectives” in A companion to translation studies, Sandra Bermann and Catherine Porter (eds), Chichester, Wiley-Blackwell: 119-31.

Ryback, Ralph S., Jane Weinert, and James L. Fozard (1970) “Disruption of short-term memory in man following consumption of ethanol”, Psychonomic Science 20, no. 6: 353-4.

Scherer, Klaus R. (2003) “Vocal communication of emotion: A review of research paradigms”, Speech Communication 40, no. 1-2: 227-56.

Searle, John R. (1969) Speech acts: An essay in the philosophy of language, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Sobell, L. C., and M. B. Sobell (1972) “Effects of Alcohol on the Speech of Alcoholics”, Journal of Speech and Hearing Research 15: 861–68.

Steele, Claude M., and Robert A. Josephs (1990) “Alcohol myopia: Its prized and dangerous effects”, American Psychologist 45, no. 8: 921-33.

Sternberg, Meir (1981) “Polylingualism as reality and translation as mimesis”, Poetics Today 2, no. 4: 221-39. http://doi.org/10.2307/1772500

Stöckl, Hartmut (2004) “In between modes: Language and image in printed media” in Perspectives on multimodality, Eija Ventola, Cassily Charles, and Martin Kaltenbacher (eds), Amsterdam and Philadelphia, John Benjamins: 9-30.

Thompson, Kimberly M., and Fumie Yokota (2001) “Depiction of alcohol, tobacco, and other substances in G-rated animated feature films”, Pediatrics 107, no. 6, 1369-74. http://doi.org/10.1542/peds.107.6.1369

Trojan, F., and K. Kryspin-Exner (1968) “The Decay of Articulation under the Influence of Alcohol and Paraldehyde”, Folia Phoniatrica (Basel) 20, no. 4: 217–38. doi:10.1159/000263201.

Valciukas, José A. (1995) Forensic neuropsychology: Conceptual foundations and clinical practice, London and New York, The Haworth Press.

Wallgren, Henrik, and Herbert Barry (1970) Actions of alcohol, Amsterdam, Elsevier.

Weil, Andrew T., and Norman E. Zinberg (1969) “Acute Effects of Marihuana on Speech”, Nature 222, no. 5192: 434–37. doi:10.1038/222434a0.

Wilson, Chris R., and Zacharia Persson (2015) “The Drunk Series”, URL: http://www.drunkseries.com/ (accessed 14 March 2017)

Wilson, Deirdre, and Dan Sperber (2004) “Relevance theory” in The Handbook of Pragmatics, Laurence R. Horn and Gregory L. Ward (eds), Oxford, Blackwell.

Zabalbeascoa, Patrick (2012) “Translating heterolingual audiovisual humor: Beyond the blinkers of traditional thinking” in The limits of literary translation: Expanding frontiers in Iberian languages, Javier Muñoz-Basols, Catarina Fouto, Laura Soler González, and Tyler Fisher (eds), Kassel, Reichenberger: 317-338.

----, and Elena Voellmer (2015) “La traducción de textos audiovisuales polilingües: Tipos de soluciones en los doblajes español y alemán” in Lingüística mediática y traducción audiovisual: Estudios comparativos español-alemán, Nadine Rentel, Ursula Reutner, and Ramona Schröpf (eds), Frankfurt am Main, Peter Lang: 71-92.

----, and Montse Corrius (in press) “Conversation as a unit of translational and film analysis. AV samples and databases of L3 multilingualism”, MonTi: Monografías de Traducción e Interpretación extra 4.

Zdenek, Sean (2015) Reading sounds: Closed-captioned media and popular culture, Chicago, University of Chicago Press.

Filmography

Barnard, Antonia, Gary Hamilton, Laurence Malkin, Share Stallings (prods), and Stephan Elliott (dir) (2011) A few best men (Una boda de muerte) [Motion Picture], Australia and United Kingdom, Screen Australia, Quickfire Films, Screen NSW, Parabolic Pictures, Stable Way Entertainment.

Bender, Chris, Larry Brezner, Kevin McCormick, Michael Tadross (prods), and Jason Winer (dir) (2011) Arthur [Motion Picture], United States, Warner Bros., MBST Entertainment, BenderSpink, K/O Camera Toys, Langley Park Productions.

Broadbent, Graham, Peter Czernin, Ronaldo Vasconcellos (prods), and Martin McDonagh (dir) (2008) In Bruges [Motion Picture], United Kingdom and United States, Blueprint Pictures, Focus Features, Scion Films, Film4, and Twins Financing.

Bruckheimer, Jerry (prod), and Michael Bay (dir) (2003) Bad Boys II (Dos policías rebeldes dos) [Motion Picture], United States, Columbia Pictures Corporation and Don Simpson/Jerry Bruckheimer Films.

Bryce, Ian, Cameron Crowe (prods), and Cameron Crowe (dir) (2000) Almost famous (Casi famosos) [Motion Picture], United States: Columbia Pictures, DreamWorks, and Vinyl Films.

Cazès, Lila, Marc S. Fischer, Annie Stewart (prods), and Mike Figgis (dir) (1995) Leaving Las Vegas [Motion Picture], United States, United Artists and Lumiere Pictures.

Coen, Joel, and Ethan Coen (1998) The big Lebowski (El gran Lebowski) [Motion Picture], United States, Polygram Filmed Entertainment, and Working Title Films.

Costas, Celia, Ang Lee, James Schamus (prods), and Ang Lee (dir) (2009) Taking Woodstock (Destino: Woodstock) [Motion Picture], United States, Focus Features.

Deutchman, I., Gladstein, R. N., Hall, D., Lulick, M. (prods), and Christopher, M. (dir) (1998) 54 [Motion Picture], United States, Dollface, FilmColony, Miramax, and Redeemable Features.

Gerber, Bill, Richard Perello (prods), and Jay Chandrasekhar (dir) (2006) Beerfest (La fiesta de la cerveza. ¡Bebe hasta reventar!) [Motion Picture], United States, Warner Bros., Legendary Entertainment, Gerber Pictures, Cataland Films, Broken Lizard Industries, and Adobe Pictures.

Greenhut, Robert (prod), and Steve Gordon (dir) (1981) Arthur (Arthur, el soltero de oro) [Motion Picture], United States, Orion Pictures and Jack Rollins & Charles H. Joffe Productions.

Hertzberg, Michael (prod), and Mel Brooks (dir) (1974) Blazing Saddles (Sillas de montar calientes) [Motion Picture], United States, Crossbow Productions and Warner Bros.

Simonds, Robert (prod.), and Tamra Davis (dir) (1995) Billy Madison [Motion Picture], United States, Universal Pictures and Robert Simonds Productions.

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"‘Mr Treehorn treats objects like women, man’: A map of drug-induced language variation in cinema and its translation"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2462

Semikommunikation als Herausforderung für audiovisuelle Translation:

die skandinavische Krimi-Miniserie Broen – Bron ('Die Brücke')

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Abstract & Keywords

English:

From a translatological point of view, semi-communication as a possible source for misunderstanding plays an interesting role in the pretty successful Swedish-Danish serial crime drama Broen – Bron (‘The Bridge’). The plot features a Swedish-Danish police collaboration and highlights the main problem area of Scandinavian semi-communication: the understanding of spoken Danish by Swedish people. Semicommunication is understood as receptive multilingualism in combination with productive monolingualism without previous foreign language learning. Because of their high degree of mutual intelligibility, based on extensive typological and genetic similarities, the Scandinavian languages Danish, Swedish and Norwegian are regarded as an example par excellence for this remarkable phenomenon. In this article, two selected sequences of Danish-Swedish semicommunication are examined with regard to (i) which translation strategies are chosen in the Scandinavian as well as in the Finnish subtitles in order to convey the problems of this special communicative constellation, and (ii) how the German (dubbed) and the English (subtitled) versions attempt to solve the task.

German:

Aus translatologischer Perspektive spielt Semikommunikation als mögliche Quelle von Missverständnissen in der sehr erfolgreichen schwedisch-dänischen Krimi-Miniserie Broen – Bron (‘Die Brücke’; in der deutschen Version mit dem Zusatz ‘Transit in den Tod’ versehen) eine interessante Rolle. Es geht darin um eine schwedisch-dänische polizeiliche Zusammenarbeit, bei der das Hauptproblem skandinavischer Semikommunikation besondere Aufmerksamkeit erfährt: das Verstehen von gesprochenem Dänisch durch Schwedischsprachige.

Unter Semikommunikation versteht man rezeptiven Multilingualismus kombiniert mit produktivem Monolingualismus ohne vorherigen Fremdsprachenerwerb. Wegen des hohen Grades an wechselseitiger Verstehbarkeit, die auf umfassenden typologischen und genetischen Ähnlichkeiten beruht, gelten die skandinavischen Sprachen Dänisch, Schwedisch und Norwegisch als Beispiele par excellence für dieses beachtenswerte Phänomen.

In diesem Beitrag werden zwei ausgewählte Sequenzen dänisch-schwedischer Semikommunikation unter den folgenden beiden Aspekten näher untersucht: (i) Welche Translationsstrategien werden in den skandinavischen, einschließlich der finnischen, Untertitelungen gewählt, um die Herausforderungen dieser besonderen kommunikativen Konstellation zu transportieren; (ii) Wie versuchen die deutsche (synchronisierte) und die englische (untertitelte) Version das Translationsproblem zu lösen?

Keywords: Semikommunikation, skandinavische Sprachen, Phonetik, Untertitelung, synchronisation, Dänisch, Schwedisch, Semicommunication, Scandinavian languages, phonetics, subtitling, dubbing, Danish, Swedish

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"Semikommunikation als Herausforderung für audiovisuelle Translation: die skandinavische Krimi-Miniserie Broen – Bron ('Die Brücke')"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2461

1. Einleitung

Die skandinavischen Sprachen Dänisch, Schwedisch und Norwegisch gelten wegen ihrer umfassenden typologischen und genetischen Ähnlichkeiten als Beispiel par excellence für eine Situation, die Semikommunikation (erstmals Haugen 1966), das heißt rezeptive Mehrsprachigkeit bei produktiver Einsprachigkeit, erlaubt. Die Konstruktion einer skandinavischen Sprachgemeinschaft (vgl. Uhlmann 2005) ist dabei durchaus auch durch die Ideologie der Verbundenheit der Nordischen Länder motiviert; so sind zum Beispiel Studienbewerberinnen und -bewerber mit einem in Norwegen und Schweden erworbenen gymnasialen Schulabschluss in Dänemark, im Unterschied zu anderen ausländischen Studierenden, vom Nachweis ausreichender Dänischkenntnisse befreit, und Entsprechendes gilt unter umgekehrten Vorzeichen für die anderen beiden Länder. Umgekehrt lassen die Praxis der interlingualen Übersetzung skandinavischer Literatur zwischen Dänisch, Schwedisch und Norwegisch, die nationalsprachige Untertitelung von Kinofilmen und Fernsehprogrammen aus den benachbarten skandinavischen Ländern und nicht zuletzt die Verwendung von Englisch als Lingua Franca in internordischen Kommunikationskontexten wie beispielsweise auf Seminaren, Tagungen und Konferenzen Zweifel an der tatsächlichen Existenz und am Funktionieren der internordischen Semikommunikation aufkommen.

Semikommunikation mit ihren möglichen Verständigungsschwierigkeiten spielt als Motiv in der sehr erfolgreichen Krimi-Miniserie Broen – Bron (Die Brücke) eine aus translatologischer Perspektive aufschlussreiche Rolle. In dieser Serie steht eine dänisch-schwedische polizeiliche Zusammenarbeit im Mittelpunkt, wobei das, wie einschlägige Untersuchungen (vgl. den Überblick in Schlüppert / Hilten / Gooskens 2016) zeigen, Hauptproblem der rezeptiven skandinavischen Mehrsprachigkeit schlaglichtartig zum Thema gemacht wird: das Verstehen von gesprochenem Dänisch durch Schwedischsprachige.

In diesem Beitrag wird beispielhaft an zwei ausgewählten, zentralen Semikommunikations-Szenen untersucht, welche Strategien einerseits die skandinavischen Untertitelungen (einschließlich der finnischen) wählen und welche Lösung andererseits die deutsche Synchronisation sowie die englische Untertitelung finden. Zunächst wird jedoch im folgenden Abschnitt 2 die Semikommunikation in den nordischen Ländern näher erörtert.

2. Semikommunikation in den nordischen Ländern

In diesem Abschnitt wird, auf der Basis von einschlägiger Überblicksliteratur (Vikør 2001, Braunmüller 2007, Karker et al. 1997, Bandle et al. 2002/2005) ein Überblick über die sprachliche Situation in den nordischen Ländern als Voraussetzung für Semikommunikation gegeben.

Zu den nordischen Ländern zählen die fünf unabhängigen Staaten Dänemark, Finnland, Island, Norwegen und Schweden. Hinzu kommt die autonome Provinz Åland (eine zwischen Schweden und Finnland gelegene Inselgruppe, zu Finnland gehörig) sowie die autonomen Regionen Färöer und Grönland (im Nordatlantik; zu Dänemark). Die Bezeichnung Skandinavien hingegen umfasst nur die Länder Dänemark, Norwegen und Schweden.

Die nordischen Länder sind nicht nur durch sprachliche Gemeinsamkeiten geprägt (siehe nächster Abschnitt 2.1.), sondern insbesondere auch durch ein gemeinsames gesellschaftlich-kulturelles Verständnis bzw. eine gemeinsame gesellschaftlich-kulturelle Ideologie. Dies kommt beispielsweise durch verschiedene Institutionen wie den 1952 gegründeten Nordischen Rat und den 1971 gegründeten Nordischen Ministerrat, beide mit einem gemeinsamen Sitz in Kopenhagen, zum Ausdruck. Konkrete Manifestationen der Ideologie der nordischen Verbundenheit sind beispielweise das Felleshus, das die nordischen Länder gemeinsam in Verbindung mit den fünf diplomatischen Vertretungen (Dänemark, Finnland, Island, Norwegen, Schweden) in Berlin unterhalten (vgl. http://www.nordischebotschaften.org); zu nennen sind auch Reiseerleichterungen wie der Wegfall von Passkontrollen beim innernordischen Grenzübertritt durch die bereits 1954 etablierte Nordische Passunion. Den Übergang zum Thema Sprache markiert das 1978 eingerichtete Nordische Sprachsekretariat[1] und die 1987 in Kraft getretene Nordische Sprachkonvention, die den Bürgerinnen und Bürgern der nordischen Länder das Recht auf die Verwendung der eigenen Sprache im Kontakt mit Behörden und öffentlichen Institutionen in den anderen Ländern garantiert. Die Sprachkonvention erweist sich dabei vor allem für Sprecher/innen des Finnischen und des Isländischen als relevant, während Verdolmetschung oder Übersetzung zwischen den skandinavischen Sprachen nicht praktiziert wird (vgl. Torp 2013: 78).

2.1. Sprachen in den nordischen Ländern

Linguistisch dominiert werden die nordischen Länder von den skandinavischen Sprachen Dänisch, Schwedisch und Norwegisch, letzteres mit den zwei Schriftstandards Bokmål und Nynorsk. Isländisch und Färöisch als kleinere und auch konservativere nordgermanische Sprachen bilden als so genanntes Inselnordisch die westliche Peripherie. Finnisch im Osten sowie die samischen Sprachen im Norden als fenno-ugrische Sprachen sowie Grönländisch als eskimo-aleutische Sprachen weit im Nordwesten tragen zur beeindruckenden sprachtyplogischen Vielfalt in den nordischen Ländern bei. Dass auch in diesen Gebieten Semikommunikation möglich sein kann, liegt daran, dass jeweils eine skandinavische Sprache ko-präsent ist: Dänisch fungiert in Island, das sich 1944 als von Dänemark unabhängig erklärte, sowie in Grönland und Färöer als den autonomen Regionen des dänischen Königreichs als obligatorische Schul-Fremdsprache. Schwedisch ist durch die relativ starke Stellung der schwedischen Minderheit in Finnland und durch die Verankerung im finnischen Bildungssystem zumindest in einigen Regionen in Finnland potenzielles Kommunikationsmittel, und die Angehörigen der samischen Bevölkerung in Norwegen und Schweden sprechen in der Regel (auch) eine skandinavische Sprache als L1.

Nicht unerwähnt bleiben sollen an autochthonen Sprachen Romani sowie die nationalen Gebärdensprachen. Im Süden Jütlands nahe der Grenze zu Deutschland ist Deutsch autochthon. Was allochthone Sprachen angeht, sind es vor allem Schweden, Norwegen und Dänemark, wo sich Migrantensprachen wie zum Beispiel Polnisch, Türkisch, Arabisch, Rumänisch oder Bosnisch geltend machen; in zunehmendem Maße betrifft dies aber auch die anderen Länder.

Die folgende Karte in Abbildung 1 aus Haugen (1984) dient zur Orientierung über die autochthonen Sprachen und ihre Hauptdialekte:

Abbildung 1: Karte der nordischen Länder, Sprachen, Hauptdialekte (Haugen 1984: 27)

Bezüglich des Skandinavischen können Dänemark, Schweden und Norwegen als ein Dialektkontinuum beschrieben werden, das heißt als ein Sprachgebiet, in dem auf der lokalen Ebene auch über Staatsgrenzen hinweg der Nachbardialekt verstanden wird. Beginnend im deutsch-dänischen Grenzgebiet ergibt sich von Süd nach Nord grob skizziert ein Übergang von den jütischen Dialekten (Jütland) über die dänischen Inseldialekte (vor allem Fünen und Seeland) und die südschwedischen Dialekte (einschließlich Bornholm) bis zu den westschwedischen Dialekten (Götamål, Göteborg). Daran grenzen im Nordwesten die ostnorwegischen Dialekte (Oslo) und westlich von diesen die westnorwegischen Dialekte (Fjordland) an – die bereits manche deutlichen Ähnlichkeiten zu den inselnordischen Sprachen Färöisch und Isländisch aufweisen. Im Nordosten der westschwedischen Dialekte (Götamål, Göteborg) setzen die ostschwedischen Dialekte in Schweden (Sveamål, Stockholm) und in den jeweiligen Küstenregionen Finnlands das Kontinuum fort. Im Norden finden sich die nordschwedischen und nordnorwegischen Dialekte (Nordlanddialekte). Dass ein solches Dialektkontinuum eine ausgesprochen günstige Voraussetzung für Semikommunikation bildet, liegt auf der Hand.

2.2 Semikommunikation

Semikommunikation, von Haugen 1966 als Terminus geprägt, bedeutet rezeptive Mehrsprachigkeit bei produktiver Einsprachigkeit. Gemeint ist, dass Skandinavier/innen untereinander in ihrer jeweiligen (skandinavischen) L1 schriftlich wie mündlich kommunizieren und die Kommunikation dank der Gemeinsamkeiten der skandinavischen Sprachen trotzdem gelingt – im entsprechenden sprachpolitischen Kontext ist gern von der „nordischen Sprachgemeinschaft“ (den nordiska språkgemenskapen) bzw. vom „Verstehen der Nachbarsprachen“ (nabo- bzw. grannspråksförståelse) die Rede (vgl. zum Beispiel Grünbaum / Reuter 2013: 5). Durch die Präsenz der skandinavischen Sprachen in den nicht-skandinavischen nordischen Ländern und Regionen ist bei entsprechenden individuellen Voraussetzungen auch mit den Angehörigen dieser Sprachgemeinschaften Semikommunikation möglich. Begünstigende Voraussetzungen für gelingende Semikommunikation sind allerdings nicht nur ein geringer linguistischer Abstand der Sprachen bezüglich der genetischen Verwandtschaft und der typologischen Ähnlichkeit sowie, zu einem geringeren Grad, eine ähnliche sprachenpolitische Praxis in Bezug auf Internationalismen und Entlehnungen. Die Einstellung zu, die Motivation für und die Erfahrung mit Semikommunikation seitens der Kommunizierenden spielen ebenfalls eine gewisse Rolle, die aber nicht überschätzt werden sollte (vgl. Gooskens 2006). Typische Strategien in der Semikommunikation sind langsameres und deutlicher artikuliertes Sprechen, das Vermeiden bekanntermaßen ‚schwieriger‘ Wörter (wie beispielsweise der dänischen Zahlwörter[2]) sowie insgesamt eine erhöhte Aufmerksamkeit für Störungen und Bereitschaft zu Reparaturen im Gespräch.

2.3 Zwei Beispiele zur Illustration

Die Möglichkeiten und Begrenzungen und insbesondere die Rolle der skandinavischen Sprachen bei der innernordischen Semikommunikation soll durch zwei Beispiele – jeweils eines aus der Sphäre der geschriebenen und eines aus der Sphäre der gesprochenen Sprache – illustriert werden.

2.3.1. Geschriebene nordische Sprachen

Das erste Beispiel fokussiert die schriftliche Form der Sprachen anhand von Übersetzungen von Artikel 1 der Allgemeinen Erklärung der Menschenrechte, in (1) in der deutschen Fassung wiedergegeben. Leicht zu erkennen ist, dass Schwedisch (2), Dänisch (3) und Norwegisch (4) große Ähnlichkeiten aufweisen; insbesondere das Dänische und das Norwegische sind sich lexikalisch sehr ähnlich bzw. umgekehrt formuliert: Unter den skandinavischen Sprachen weicht das Schwedische am meisten ab. Es bedarf hingegen einiger Kreativität (oder eben philologischer Kenntnisse), um Gemeinsamkeiten mit dem ebenfalls nordgermanischen, aber eben deutlich konservativeren Färöischen (5) oder, noch weiter entfernt, dem Isländischen (6) zu finden. Die fenno-ugrischen Sprachen Finnisch (7) und Samisch (8) weisen, bei weitläufiger genetischer Verwandtschaft untereinander, kaum erkennbare Ähnlichkeiten auf. Ganz verschieden stellt sich das Grönländische (9) dar.

(1)

Alle Menschen sind frei und gleich an Würde und Rechten geboren. Sie sind mit Vernunft und Gewissen begabt und sollen einander im Geist der Brüderlichkeit begegnen.

Schwedisch:

(2)

Alla människor äro födda fria och lika i värde och rättigheter. De äro utrustade med förnuft och samvete och böra handla gentemot varandra i en anda av broderskap.

Dänisch:

(3)

Alle mennesker er født frie og lige i værdighed og rettigheder. De er udstyret med fornuft og samvittighed, og de bør handle mod hverandre i en broderskabets ånd.

Norwegisch (Bokmål):

(4)

Alle mennesker er født frie og med samme menneskeverd og menneske­rettigheter. De er utstyrt med fornuft og samvittighet og bør handle mot hverandre i brorskapets ånd.

Ähnliche (und kognate) Textwörter mit beibehaltener Flexion sind in (5) in der Reihenfolge Schwedisch – Dänisch – Norwegisch versammelt:

(5)

alla – alle – alle ‘alle’

äro – er – er ‘sind’

människor – mennesker – mennesker ‘Menschen’

födda – født – født ‘geboren’

fria – fire – frie ‘frei’

och – og – og ‘und’

lika – lige – […]‘gleich’

värde – værdighed – (menneske)verd ‘Wert’

rättigheter – rettigheder – (menneske)rettigheter ‘Rechte’

de – de – de ‘die’

med – med – med ‘mit’

förnuft – fornuft – fornuft ‘Vernunft’

böra – bør – bør ‘sollten’

handla – handle – handle ‘handeln’

varandra – hverandre – hverandre ‘einander’

i – i – i ‘in’

anda – ånd – ånd ‘Geist’

broderskap – brorskap(ets) – brorskap(ets) ‘Bruderschaft, Brüderlichkeit’

Färöisch:

(6)

Øll menniskju eru fødd fræls og jøvn til virðingar og mannarættindi. Tey hava skil og samvitsku og eiga at fara hvørt um annað í bróðuranda.

In der färöischen Passage (6) sind zumindest die ersten Wörter – Øll menniskju eru fødd – sowie einige andere wie og ‘und’ oder bróður-anda wörtlich ‘Bruder-Geist’ den skandinavischen einigermaßen ähnlich.

Isländisch:

(7)

Hver maður er borinn frjáls og jafn öðrum að virðingu og réttindum. Menn eru gæddir vitsmunum og samvizku, og ber þeim að breyta bróðurlega hverjum við annan.

Im Isländischen (7) sind unmittelbar nur einzelne Wörter identifizierbar: er ‘ist’, virðingu og réttindum zu ‘Wert und Recht’, bróður(lega) ‘brüder(lich)’;

Finnisch:

(8)

Kaikki ihmiset syntyvät vapaina ja tasavertaisina arvoltaan ja oikeuksiltaan. Heille on annettu järki ja omatunto, ja heidän on toimittava toisiaan kohtaan veljeyden hengessä.

Samisch (Nordsamisch):

(9)

Buot olbmot leat riegádan friddjan ja olmmošárvvu ja olmmošvuoigatvuoðaid dáfus dássásažžab. Sudhuude kea addib huervnu ha ianedivdym ha vyigjat gakget neabbydut gyunnuudeaset gyivdy vuekhakaš vuoiŋŋain.

Grönländisch:

(10)

Inuit tamarmik inunngorput nammineersinnaassuseqarlutik assigiimmillu ataqqinassuseqarlutillu pisinnaatitaaffeqarlutik. Solaqassusermik tarnillu nalunngissusianik pilersugaapput, imminnullu iliorfigeqatigiittariaqaraluarput qatanngutigiittut peqatigiinnerup anersaavani.

Die Beispiele zeigen, welch wichtige Funktion und auch welches Potenzial gerade die skandinavischen Sprachen in den nordischen Ländern haben, um diese fünf hoch entwickelten Staaten mit zirka 26 Millionen Einwohnern für Semikommunikation zu erschließen. Dass dieses Potenzial bei weitem nicht genutzt wird, sondern im Gegenteil durch die Verwendung des Englischen als allgemeine Verständigungssprache auch außerhalb von wissenschaftlichen beziehungsweise generell professionellen Zusammenhängen zunehmend unter Druck zu stehen scheint, wird durchaus kritisch diskutiert (vgl. zum Beispiel Torp 2004: 73 und Grünbaum / Reuter 2013: 8).

2.3.2. Gesprochene skandinavische Sprachen

Im zweiten Beispiel erfolgt eine Konzentration auf die skandinavischen Sprachen Schwedisch, Dänisch und Norwegisch, die aus der Perspektive der Semikommunikation immer wieder Gegenstand von Untersuchungen gewesen sind. Das für die vorliegende Fragestellung wichtigste Ergebnis, das von mehreren Studien reproduziert worden ist, ist folgendes: Während geschriebenes Dänisch, Norwegisch oder Schwedisch generell keine großen semikommunikativen Probleme bereitet – am ehesten zwischen Dänisch und Schwedisch, dann jedoch gleichermaßen in beide Richtungen –, kommt es bei gesprochener Sprache zu auffälligen Asymmetrien. Es ist insbesondere das gesprochene Dänisch, das Probleme bereitet, und es sind die Schwed/innen, die sich mit dem Verstehen besonders schwertun.

Abbildung 2. Telemann 1987 (zitiert in Løland 1997)

Abbildung 2 zeigt die Ergebnisse einer Untersuchung von Teleman (1987) zum Verstehen von gesprochenem Norwegisch, Schwedisch und Dänisch, das heißt der drei zentralen nordischen Semikommunikationssprachen. Erhoben wurden die Untersuchungsdaten bereits in den 1970er Jahren mit Rekruten aus den drei Hauptstädten, Oslo, Stockholm und Kopenhagen als Informanten. Die dicke Linie zeigt an, wie viel ein/e Sprecher/in der einen Sprache von jeweils den beiden anderen versteht bzw. angibt zu verstehen. In dem Dreieck oben links wird angezeigt, wie viel Schwedisch (svensk) und Dänisch (dansk) eine Person mit Norwegisch als L1 (norsk lytter ‘norwegische/r Hörer/in’) verstehen kann: Etwas mehr Schwedisch als Dänisch, aber von beiden Sprachen sehr viel. Das Dreieck oben rechts zeigt, wie viel Norwegisch (norsk) und Schwedisch (svensk) eine Person mit Dänisch als L1 (dansk lytter ‘dänische/r Hörer/in’) verstehen kann und es wird deutlich, dass Norwegisch für Dän/innen sehr gut zu verstehen ist, während das Schwedische doch einige Schwierigkeiten bereitet. Klar wird auch, dass Dän/innen Norwegisch besser verstehen als umgekehrt Norweger/innen Dänisch. Im Dreieck unten wird die dritte Variante gezeigt: Schwed/innen (‘schwedische/r Hörer/in’) können Dänisch kaum, Norwegisch hingegen recht gut verstehen. Deutlich wird somit, dass es vor allem die Verständigung Dänisch-Schwedisch ist, die Probleme bereitet, und innerhalb dieser wiederum das Verstehen des gesprochenen Dänisch. Die asymmetrische Situation muss jedoch zum Teil auch als der Erhebungsmethode geschuldet betrachtet werden: Während Kopenhagen und Oslo geographisch nah oder doch recht nah am schwedischen Sprachgebiet platziert sind, liegt Stockholm abseits des dänischen und norwegischen Sprachgebiets, mit einer anzunehmenden niedrigeren Intensität sprachlicher Kontakte. Torp (2004: 71) weist außerdem darauf hin, dass zur Zeit der Datenerhebung zwar in Kopenhagen und Oslo schwedisches, in Stockholm jedoch kein dänisches oder norwegisches Fernsehen empfangen werden konnte. Die Frage, wie stark der Einfluss dieser Faktoren auf die Ergebnisse ist, muss allerdings unbeantwortet bleiben.

Die Frage, ob intensivere Sprachkontakte ein besseres Verstehen der Nachbarsprachen zur Folge hat, wird von Kürschner / Gooskens (2011) aufgegriffen und in einem internetbasierten Experiment untersucht, bei dem Gymnasiast/innen bestimmte Einzelwörter (Substantive) aus einer anderen germanischen Sprache übersetzen sollten. Es handelt sich hier also nicht um eine Erhebung der Selbsteinschätzung des globalen Sprachenverstehens, sondern um die messbare „Erkennung von Lautketten [aus den Nachbarsprachen, K.G.] und den Abgleich dieser Lautketten mit den im mentalen Lexikon abgespeicherten Vergleichsketten“ (Kürschner / Gooskens 2011: 161) der eigenen Sprache; inwieweit das Erkennen von isoliert präsentierten Wörtern mit dem Verstehen einer Sprache gleichzusetzen ist, kann sicherlich diskutiert werden. Interessanterweise ergeben sich bei dem Experiment jedoch kaum signifikante Ergebnisse, die belegen würden, dass die Grenznähe des Wohnortes (und damit intensivere Sprachkontakte) zu einem besseren Verstehen führen würden.

Außerhalb der skandinavischen Länder stellt sich die semikommunikative Situation folgendermaßen dar: Dänisch ist als Schulsprache in Island, auf den Färöern und in Grönland stark präsent. Das Dänische in diesen Ländern bzw. Regionen zeichnet sich dadurch aus, dass es „näher an der Schrift“ ist, das heißt, dass es die jüngsten Schwächungs- und Verschleifungsprozesse des Dänemark- und insbesondere des Kopenhagen-Dänischen nicht mitgemacht hat. Dadurch ist es für andere Bewohner/innen der nordischen Länder leichter zu verstehen; für das Verstehen des Dänemark-Dänischen stellt dies jedoch eine zusätzliche Schwierigkeit dar. Schwedisch wiederum gehört zu den autochthonen Sprachen in Finnland und ist ebenfalls im Schulsystem präsent, aber es ist doch für die meisten Finn/innen eine Fremdsprache mit entsprechenden Konsequenzen für das Verstehen der anderen skandinavischen Sprachen. Auch Finnländer/innen mit Schwedisch als L1 haben große Schwierigkeiten, gesprochenes Dänisch zu verstehen.

Abbildung 3. Uhlmann 1991 (in der Darstellung von Vikør 1995)

Abbildung 3 gibt die Ergebnisse einer Untersuchung von Börestam Uhlmann von 1991 wieder, in der Darstellung von Vikør 2001. Neben Norweger/innen (N), Schwed/innen (S) und Dän/innen (D) werden hier Finnlandschwed/innen (FS) als eigenständige Gruppe behandelt. Basierend auf der Selbsteinschätzung der Sprecher/innen – junge Leute, die im Rahmen eines Austauschprogramms in einem anderen skandinavischen Land einen Sommerjob hatten – sind die Zahlen an den Pfeilen ein Maß dafür, wie viele der Befragten in Prozent angaben, die jeweilige Sprache „sehr gut“ zu verstehen (die Antwortalternativen waren „einigermaßen“ und „schlecht“). Die Richtung der Pfeile steht für die Richtung der Kommunikation: 47,9 über dem Pfeil von D nach S bedeutet, dass 47,9 Prozent der Schwed/innen angeben, Dänisch „sehr gut“ zu verstehen. Bekannt ist eine Tendenz zur Überbewertung des eigenen Verstehens, allerdings ist Verstehen ist auch schwer zu quantifizieren. Wie auch immer man die methodologischen Probleme bewerten mag, die Zahlen zeigen, dass relativ gesehen gesprochenes Dänisch durchgängig Verstehensprobleme hervorruft.

Im Folgenden wird anhand eines Ausschnitts (des Textanfangs) der in der Phonetik oft genutzten Fabel Der Nordwind und die Sonne in der dänischen und in der schwedischen Version illustriert, wie unterschiedlich die phonetischen Realisierungen zweier graphematisch nicht sonderlich weit voneinander abweichenden Sprachen sind.

In deutscher Version (11) lautet der Textanfang wie folgt (Kohler 1999):

(11)

Einst stritten sich Nordwind und Sonne, wer von ihnen beiden wohl der Stärkere wäre, als ein Wanderer, der in einen warmen Mantel gehüllt war, des Weges daherkam. Sie wurden einig, daß [sic] derjenige für den Stärkeren gelten sollte, der den Wanderer zwingen würde, seinen Mantel abzunehmen.

Beim Schwedischen (Engstrand 1999) lassen sich die in (12) gegebene graphematische Repräsentation und die Transkription in Abbildung 3 noch relativ leicht Segment für Segment aufeinander beziehen, abgesehen von einzelnen Reduktionen wie <Nordan> ~ [nù:ɖan] ‘Nord’, <och> ~ [ɔ] ‘und’ oder <var> ~ [vɑ] ‘war’:

Schwedisch – Graphematische Repräsentation:

(12)

Nordanvinden och solen tvistade en gång om vem av dom som var starkast. Just då kom en vandrare vägen fram, insvept i en varm kappa. Dom kom då överens om, att den som först kunde få vandraren att ta av sig kappen, han skulle anses vara starkare än den andra.

Schwedisch – Phonetische Repräsentation:

Abbildung 4: Textanfang Nordwind und Sonne, schwedische Version, Engstrand (1999: 141).

Beim Dänischen (Grønnum 1998) sind die Verhältnisse andere, die Herstellung von Graphem-Phonem-Korrespondenzen fällt deutlich schwerer, vgl. (13) und Abbildung 5:

Dänisch – Graphematische Repräsentation:

(13)

Nordenvinden og solen kom engang i strid om, hvem af dem der var den stærkeste. Da så de en vandringsmand, der kom gående, svøbt i en varm kappe. Og de enedes om, at den der først kunne få kappen af ham skulle anses for den stærkeste.

Dänisch – Phonetische Repräsentation:

Abbildung 5: Textanfang Nordwind und Sonne, dänische Version, Grønnum (1998: 104)

Weshalb gesprochenes Dänisch so schwer zu verstehen ist, hat Grønnum 2003 zusammengefasst: Neben sehr stark reduzierten unbetonten Silben, neben Assimilationen und Elisionen über die Silben- und damit auch Wortgrenzen hinweg spielt die Schwächung bin hin zur Vokalisierung von Konsonanten – sogar von Obstruenten (vgl. Basbøll 2005: 258-259) – eine wesentliche Rolle, da sie nicht nur viele phonetische Diphthonge entstehen lässt, sondern auch, wie Bleses und Basbøll im Kontext von dänischem L1-Ewerb (2004) diskutieren, die Segmentierung von Wörtern und die Identifizierung von Silbengrenzen erschweren. Hinzukommen als ungewöhnliche und für das Dänische charakteristische Lauterscheinungen das so genannte „weiche d“, ein dentaler Approximant[3] [ð̞] sowie der Stød (Stoßton), eine Art Laryngalisierung (Knarrstimme, creaky voice), im Beispiel (Abbildung 5) durch [ˀ] symbolisiert.

Es ergibt sich insgesamt folgendes Bild an Unterschieden (und, implizit, Gemeinsamkeiten) zwischen dem Schwedischen, Dänischen und Norwegischen:

Abbildung 6: Hauptsächliche, die Semikommunikation beeinträchtigende Unterschiede zwischen skandinavischen Sprachen (nach Gooskens 2007)

Die Abbildung zeigt in schematischer Weise, dass es zwischen dem Dänischen und dem Norwegischen vor allem phonetische Unterschiede sind, die die Verständlichkeit reduzieren, während, implizit, die Lexik keine Probleme bereitet. Zwischen dem Schwedischen und dem Norwegischen sind in erster Linie lexikalische Unterschiede für Verstehensprobleme verantwortlich, während sich, implizit, die Phonetik als unproblematisch erweist. Zwischen dem Dänischen und dem Schwedischen sind sowohl phonetische als auch lexikalische Unterschiede für die Beeinträchtigung des Verstehens verantwortlich.

3. Die Krimi-Serie Broen – Bron (‘Die Brücke’) in audiovisueller Translation

3.1. Audiovisuelle Translation

In diesem Beitrag soll nicht im Detail auf die Bedingungen audiovisueller Translation eingegangen werden. Erinnert sei lediglich an den Umstand, dass die Untertitelung als „gekürzte Übersetzung eines Filmdialogs, die synchron mit dem entsprechenden Teil des Originals auf dem Bildschirm bzw. auf der Leinwand zu sehen ist“ (Hurt und Widler 1998: 261), gewissen Beschränkung unterliegt und, als Richtwert, zwei Zeilen mit je 35 Zeichen umfasst, die zentriert am unteren Bildrand für zwei bis höchstens sechs Sekunden sichtbar sind. Dies kann insbesondere bei dialogintensiven Filmen zu Problemen führen, da Reduktionen unvermeidlich sind. Generell ist aber die inhaltliche Reduktion (über Redundantes hinaus) nicht besonders umfangreich, vgl. Kristmansson (1996). Nichtstandradsprachliches wie dialektale Färbungen, soziolektale Eigenheiten oder andere Besonderheiten des Varietätenspektrums einer Sprache jenseits der Standardvarietät sowie fremdsprachliche Akzente erweisen sich in der Untertitelung als Translationsproblem und werden deshalb in der Regel mehr oder weniger stark reduziert; vgl. hierzu zum Beispiel Geyer (2013, 2015). Die Synchronisation wiederum wird, vor allem in Synchronisationsländern selbst, immer wieder als künstlerische Verfälschung kritisiert, die das Publikum der Möglichkeit berauben würde, den „originalen“ Dialog mit den „originalen“ Stimmen zu hören. Dass dies nur bedingt der Realität der fiktionalen Filmwelten[4] entspricht, die ja teilweise selbst mit Nachsynchronisation arbeitet, liegt auf der Hand; dass Synchronisation in jedem Fall einen massiven Eingriff in das Kunstwerk Film darstellt, ebenfalls.[5]

Mehr als die tatsächlichen Stärken und Schwächen der beiden Verfahren Untertitelung und Synchronisation scheinen jedoch die sehr konservativen Sehgewohnheiten und -erwartungen in den Synchronisations- wie in den Untertitelungsländern in Verbindung mit einflussreichen wirtschaftlichen Interessen und etablierten Strukturen der lokalen Translationsindustrien zum Erhalt des Status Quo beizutragen (vgl. Jüngst 2010: 4-6).

Im untersuchten Fall der Krimi-Miniserie Broen – Bron (‘Die Brücke’) ist die deutsche Fassung die einzige synchronisierte. Die nordischen Sprachen und die englische Fassung arbeiten mit Untertiteln. Im Folgenden ist zu analysieren, wie die unterschiedlichen Sprachfassungen das Phänomen der dänisch-schwedischen Semikommunikation handhaben.

3.2. Über die Serie

Erstmals im September 2011 in Dänemark und Schweden und im März 2012 in Deutschland ausgestrahlt, hat sich die dänisch-schwedische Krimiserie Broen – Bron (‘Die Brücke’; Broen ist der dänische, Bron der schwedische Titel) zu einem überaus erfolgreichen Format mit mittlerweile vier Staffeln entwickelt; es gibt auch eine US-amerikanische, eine französisch-britische und eine russische Adaption von Broen – Bron. Der für das Krimi-Genre durchaus anspruchsvolle und gesellschaftsrelevante Plot soll hier nicht weiter ausgeführt werden; er kann auf den einschlägigen Internet-Portalen nachgelesen werden. Was Broen – Bron aus der Perspektive der audiovisuellen Translation interessant macht, ist, dass ein wesentliches Moment in der dänisch-schwedischen polizeilichen Zusammenarbeit zwischen den beiden Protagonist/innen, der schwedischen Kriminalkommissarin Saga Norén aus Malmö und dem dänischen Kriminalkommissar Martin Rohde aus Kopenhagen, besteht. Überhaupt ist das Zusammenspiel von und der Wechsel zwischen den dänischen und den schwedischen Schauplätzen, Figuren und Milieus ein charakteristisches Merkmal der gesamten Serie. Die Öresund-Brücke zwischen Kopenhagen und Malmö symbolisiert diese Verbindungen, und sie ist zugleich Schauplatz der Eröffnungsszene. Zur dänisch-schwedischen Thematik, die nicht immer frei von stereotypischen Darstellungen inszeniert wird, gehört auch die Semikommunikation mit den beiden Sprachen Dänisch und Schwedisch einschließlich der Verstehensprobleme, die in manchen Szenen thematisiert wird. Eine Rezensentin bemerkt dazu: „Besonderes Highlight der Serie ist außerdem das Zusammenprallen der schwedischen und dänischen Sprache und die damit einhergehenden (vor allem für Sprachkundige nachvollziehbaren) kleinen Konflikte.“ (Jaana Bla 2013 auf http://www.besser-nord-als-nie.net/allgemein/ungleich-vor-dem-gesetz 22.09,.2013)

Dieser Beitrag konzentriert sich auf die erste Staffel. Es wird mit zwei DVD-Ausgaben gearbeitet: Zum einen ist dies die skandinavische Ausgabe (Scanbox, 2012, 4 DVDs) für die dänischen, norwegischen, schwedischen, finnischen und englischen Untertitel, zum anderen die deutsche Ausgabe mit dem Titel Die Brücke – Transit in den Tod (Edel, 2012, 5 DVDs) für die deutsche Synchronfassung, die durch die FFS Film- & Fernseh-Synchron in Berlin erfolgte. Da die standardmäßigen dänischen und schwedischen Untertitel nur die jeweils andere Sprache in den Dialogen enthalten – also die dänischen Untertitel nur das Schwedische und die schwedischen Untertitel nur das Dänische, – wird für diese beiden Sprachen auf die Untertitel für Hörgeschädigte und Gehörlose zurückgegriffen, die die kompletten, mehrsprachigen Dialoge enthalten.

Als Drehbuch-Hauptautor der Staffel firmiert Hans Rosenfeldt, Ko-Autor/innen sind Camilla Ahlgren, Måns Mårlind, Nikolaj Scherfing und Björn Stein. Regie führten Henrik Georgsson, Charlotte Sieling und Lisa Siwe. In den Hauptrollen der schwedischen Kommissarin Saga Norén ist Sofia Helin zu sehen und Kim Bodnia spielt den dänischen Kommissar Martin Rohde.

3.3. Zwei Szenen

Zwei Szenen sollen untersucht werden. Zum einen ist dies – Szene 1 – die erste Begegnung der schwedischen Kriminalkommissarin Saga Norén mit dem dänischen Kriminalkommissar Martin Rohde aus Kopenhagen, bei der der dänische Kommissar seiner schwedischen Kollegin auf deren Frage hin seinen Namen sagt. Da sie den Namen nicht versteht, muss Rohde ihn buchstabieren. Zum anderen handelt es sich um eine etwas längere Szene, in der der Martin Rohde erstmals das schwedische Kriminalteam in Malmö besucht, wo er (Szene 2a) sowohl die richtige Aussprache seines Namens erklärt als auch (Szene 2b) eine kurze Sachverhaltsdarstellung zu einem bis dato ungelösten Mordfall gibt, diese aber anschließend langsamer und deutlicher artikuliert wiederholen muss, da die Mitglieder des schwedischen Kriminalteams wegen sprachlicher Schwierigkeiten nur unzureichend folgen können.

3.3.1. Szene 1

Die erste Begegnung von Saga Norén mit Martin Rohde spielt sich auf der Öresund-Brücke zwischen Kopenhagen/Dänemark und Malmö/Schweden ab; direkt auf der Brücke, quer zur Fahrbahn, verläuft die Staatsgrenze zwischen den beiden Ländern, und da die gefundene Leiche zur Hälfte auf der dänischen und zur Hälfte auf der schwedischen Seite der Grenze liegt, wird eine dänisch-schwedische polizeiliche Zusammenarbeit erforderlich – auch wenn diese Aussicht nicht auf Gegenliebe der als autistisch gezeichneten Figur Saga Norén stößt. Als Rohde im Zusammenhang mit Kompetenzstreitigkeiten der schwedischen Kollegin seinen Namen nennt und Saga Norén den Namen nicht versteht, muss Martin Rohde ihn buchstabieren (7 Min. 45 Sek.). Die phonetische Form des Nachnamens [ʁo:ð̞ə] enthält den Approximanten [ð̞] als eines der für das Verstehen von gesprochenem Dänisch kritischen Elemente; darüber hinaus ist die zweite Silbe stark reduziert.

Der Dialogtext ist folgender, in literarischer Transkription:

S = Saga Norén, Schwedisch; M = Martin Rohde, Dänisch

(14)

S

M

S

M

S

M

Du, vad heter du? ‘Du, wie heißt du?’

Martin.

mer? ‘Weiter?’

Rohde.

Ro…?

er o ho de e.

Bemerkenswert ist, dass die Untertitelungen für diese Sequenz etwas unterschiedliche Strategien wählen: Der dänische Untertitel verzichtet auf die Darstellung der Nachfrage und zeigt nur das Buchstabieren unter Verwendung von durch Kommata getrennten Majuskeln an: „R, O, H, D, E.“ Das Schwedische und ebenso das Finnische geben die Nachfrage mit dem Wortabbruch „Ro…?“ wieder, in der zweiten Untertitelzeile erfolgen sodann die Anzeige des Sprecherwechsels mittels Bindestrich sowie das Buchstabieren anhand von durch Bindestriche getrennten Buchstaben: „-R-o-h-d-e.“ Die englischen Untertitel schließlich präsentieren in der Nachfrage den vollen Namen (eingeleitet durch Sprecherwechsel-Bindestrich) „-Rohde?“ und in der zweiten Untertitelzeile als Antwort, wie im dänischen Untertitel, das Buchstabieren unter Verwendung von durch Kommata getrennte Majuskeln: „R, O, H, D, E.“ Es ist fraglich, ob durch diese Darstellung das semikommunikative Sprachproblem vermittelt werden kann. Allerdings unterstützen in jedem Falle die fragende Mimik von Norén und der gesamte situationelle Kontext das Verstehen der Szene.

In der deutschen Synchronfassung wird die Szene folgendermaßen behandelt:

S = Saga Norén; M = Martin Rohde

(15)

S

M

S

M

S

M

Und Sie, wie heißen Sie?

Martin.

Und weiter?

Rohde. [ʁɔ:ə]

Ro…?

er o ha de e.

Dass der dänische Polizist zunächst nur seinen Vornamen nennt, mag merkwürdig erscheinen, selbst wenn man sich im aus deutscher Perspektive skandinavischen Duz-Universum befindet. Die sehr undeutliche Aussprache des auf Nachfrage genannten Nachnamens, die eine weitere Nachfrage und schließlich das Buchstabieren bewirkt, kann jedoch immerhin einen Hinweis auf Kommunikationsschwierigkeiten vermitteln, wenn auch die spezielle Situation der Semikommunikation durch die Synchronisation in durchgängig deutscher Sprache verloren geht.

3.3.2. Szene 2a

Bei Szene 2a handelt es sich um eine etwas längere Szene, in der der Martin Rohde erstmals das schwedische Kriminalteam, bestehend aus Saga Norén und fünf weiteren Personen, in Malmö besucht. Zunächst erklärt Rohde die richtige Aussprache seines Namens (31 Min. 14 Sek.), daran anschließend gibt er eine kurze Sachverhaltsdarstellung zu einem ungelösten Mordfall (31 Min. 38 Sek.). Da die Mitglieder des schwedischen Kriminalteams wegen der sprachlichen Schwierigkeiten nur unzureichend folgen können, sieht er sich gezwungen, die Darstellung langsamer und deutlicher artikuliert zu wiederholen.

Der Dialogtext von Szene 2a ist folgender, in literarischer Transkription:

S = Saga Norén, Schwedisch; M = Martin Rohde, Dänisch

(16)

S

 

M

Det här er Martin Rohde [ʁɔð̞ə] från Köpenhamns polis.

‘Das hier ist Martin Rohde von der Polizei Kopenhagen’

Hej [hɛʝ]. Det er Rohde. Ligesom når du skal sige ’rødgrød med fløde’. Rohde … flode.

‘Hej. Es ist Rohde. Wie wenn du rødgrød med fløde sagen sollst. Rohde … flode.’

In der kurzen Sequenz sind mehre Aspekte bemerkenswert: Zum einen verwendet der dänische Polizist die schwedische Variante hej des Grußes, nicht das dänische hei [hai], und zeigt damit Verständnis für die Probleme der Semikommunikation an beziehungsweise signalisiert seine Bereitschaft zur sprachlichen Kooperation. Das anschließende rødgrød med fløde ‘Rote Grütze mit Sahne’ ist die wohl bekannteste Phrase, anhand derer Dän/innen selbst einerseits die charakteristischen Besonderheiten der Lautung des Dänischen explizieren und andererseits die Qualität der erworbenen phonetischen Dänischkenntnisse von Ausländer/innen überprüfen, also ein typisches Schibboleth. Ein hervorstechendes Merkmal ist der dentale Approximant [ð̞], der gleich an vier Stellen vorkommt, davon drei Mal in Verbindung mit dem ebenfalls charakteristischen Stød [ˀ]: [ʁœð̞ˀgʁœð̞ˀ mɛð̞ˀ flø:ð̞ə].[6] Hinzu kommen die gerundeten Vordervokale [œ] und [ø], die zwar im Kontext der anderen skandinavischen Sprachen, des Finnischen und des Deutschen unauffällig sind, typologisch allerdings eher selten auftreten (vgl. Maddieson 1984: 124) und beispielsweise auch im englischen Lautinventar fehlen. Das allen Skandinaviern geläufige dänische Schibboleth wird in Szene 2a für die Erklärung der richtigen Aussprache des Namens aktiviert. Dass am Ende eine Assonanz von Rohde mit flode hergestellt wird, ist insofern bemerkenswert, als flode ein Wort ist, dass es im Dänischen nicht gibt,[7] dessen Aussprache [flo:ð̞ə] aber aus der phonotaktischen Wohlgeformtheit und im Untertitel aus der graphematischen Form regelmäßig vorhergesagt werden kann.

Welche Lösungen die Untertitel finden, soll nun im Detail analysiert werden. Die dänischen Untertitel geben den Dialogtext glatt wieder, einschließlich des Phantasiewortes flode. Es sei an dieser Stelle daran erinnert, dass es sich bei den untersuchten dänischen um Untertitel für Hörgeschädigte und Gehörlose handelt, denn nur dort wird überhaupt das Dänische untertitelt. Die dänischen Standard-Untertitel untertiteln nur die schwedischen Passagen.

Dass das Norwegische in semikommunikativer Hinsicht dem Dänischen am nächsten ist, zeigt sich daran, dass die Assonanz Rohde – flode ohne Untertitel bleibt; die Erwartung ist offenbar, dass das Publikum die Passage versteht. flode im Untertitel wäre denn auch keine funktionale Option, da es, obwohl auch im Norwegischen kein existierendes Wort, im Kontext der existierenden Wörter flod ‘Flut; (breiter) Fluss’, Pl. floder die phonetische Form [flʉ:də] evozieren würde; vgl (17):

(17)

M

Jeg heter Rohde. Akkurat

som i ”rødgrød med fløde” |

[kein UT]

‘Ich heiße Rohde. Genau wie in rødgrød med fløde.’

Der schwedische Untertitel versucht, die besondere phonetische Qualität des durch die Graphemfolge <th> wiederzugeben, wohl in Anlehnung an den Lautwert des englischen intervokalischen <th> als Frikativ [ð]. Das Graphem <ø> – die schwedische Graphematik kennt nur <ö> – in fløde und damit ein Hinweis auf die dänische Charakteristik wird beibehalten, um nicht mit flode eine falsche Spur zu legen: flode gibt es zwar auch im Schwedischen nicht als Wort, die naheliegende Aussprache wäre aber wie im Norwegischen ungefähr [flʉ:də], was unnötige Verwirrung bzgl. des Vokals und der Assonanz der beiden Wörter stiften könnte.

(18)

M

Det ska vara ”Roothe”.

Ungefär som i rød grød med fløde… |

Rohde, fløde…

‘Es muss „Roothe“ sein. Ungefähr wie in rød grød med fløde. Rohde, fløde …’

Die finnischen Untertitel folgen den schwedischen:

(19)

M

Se lausutaan ”Roothe”

Niin kuin rød grød med fløde… |

Rohde, fløde…

‘Es wird “Roothe” ausgesprochen. So wie rød grød med fløde. Rohde, fløde…

Für das Englische funktioniert die Schibboleth-Phrase rød grød med fløde aus Gründen der kulturellen Distanz nicht. Gewählt wird deshalb etwas anderes, was allerdings recht undurchschaubar wirkt:

(20)

M

It’s Rohde

Not as when you say ”fur”

Rohde, Foure…

Immerhin scheint damit die übergeordnete Intention vermittelt werden zu können, nämlich dass der Name Rohde für die Schwed/innen nicht nur schwer zu verstehen, sondern auch schwer auszusprechen ist.

Auch die Lösung in der deutschen Synchronisation scheint nicht unproblematisch. Der deutsche Dialogtext ist folgender, in literarischer Transkription:

S = Saga Norén; M = Martin Rohde

(21)

S

M

Das ist Martin Rohde [ʁo:də] von der Kopenhagener Polizei.

Hallo. Ich heiß eigentlich Rohde [ɹɔ:ɖə]. Die Aussprache ist ganz leicht, man muss sich nur die Zunge verdrehen. [ɹɔ:ɖə] Nicht verkanten.” (lacht)

Bemerkenswert ist hier vor allem Korrektur des standardsprachlich ausgesprochenen Namens Rohde [ʁo:də], der ja relativ nah an der dänischen phonetischen Form liegt, hin zu einer Form mit einem anlautenden Approximanten [ɹ] und einem retroflexen Plosiv [ɖ] (beziehungsweise einem Schlaglaut [ɽ]). Die dadurch entstehende Aussprache erinnert stark an ostnorwegische Dialekte und ist für das Dänische völlig ausgeschlossen. Nirgendwo in der ersten Staffel erscheint der Name Rohde jemals wieder in dieser Lautform.

3.3.3. Szene 2b

Anschließend an die Klärung der richtigen Aussprache seines Nachnamens berichtet der dänische Polizist in Szene 2b in aller Kürze von einem ungelösten Mordfall, doch die ratlosen Blicke der schwedischen Kolleginnen und Kollegen vermitteln ihm, dass sie ihn nicht verstanden haben. Daraufhin wiederholt er die Darstellung des Sachverhaltes und passt dabei seine Sprechweise an die semikommunikativen Gegebenheiten an.

Der gesprochene dänische Text in der Szene ist folgender, in literarischer Transkription:

Erste Darstellung des Sachverhalts:

(22)

Alt peger på, at det er Monique Brammer, hun er 23 år gammel og født i København.

Prostitueret og narkoman. Hun forsvandt for 13 måneder siden og vi har aldrig fundet noget lig.

‘Alles deutet darauf hin, dass das Monique Brammer ist, sie ist 23 Jahre alt und in Kopenhagen geboren. Prostituierte und drogenabhängig. Sie verschwand vor 13 Monaten und wir haben nie eine Leiche gefunden.’

An die semikommunikativen Gegebenheiten angepasste Wiederholung:

(23)

Monique Brammer, 23 år. Hun er prostitueret narkoman. Hun forsvandt for 13 måneder siden og vi fandt aldrig noget lig.

‘Monique Brammer, 23 Jahre. Sie ist Prostituierte und drogenabhängig. Sie verschwand vor 13 Monaten und wir haben nie eine Leiche gefunden.’ [lit.: wir fanden nie eine Leiche]

Das Sprechtempo bei der ersten Darstellung ist relativ schnell, womit eine (noch) stärkere Reduktion unbetonter Silben einhergeht als sie ohnehin schon für das Dänische charakteristisch ist; in der Wiederholung spricht Rohde deutlich langsamer. Die gesamte Äußerung nimmt in beiden Varianten 7,2 Sekunden ein. Da die Wiederholung weniger Wörter umfasst (20 gegenüber 33), beträgt die Sprechgeschwindigkeit, gemessen in Silben (σ) pro Sekunde, jedoch in der ersten Darstellung 7,8 σ/sek. gegenüber 5,1 σ/sek. in der Wiederholung. Der erste Wert befindet sich im absolut oberen, der zweite Wert im unteren Bereich normaler Sprechgeschwindigkeit (vgl. beispielsweise Pompino-Marschall 1995: 238). Hinzu kommen die kaum modulierte Prosodie sowie die Phrasierung in lediglich zwei intonatorischen Einheiten in der ersten Darstellung gegenüber einer stärkeren prosodischen Konturierung (Betonungen und Tonhöhenbewegungen) und der Phrasierung vier intonatorische Einheiten bei der Wiederholung. Zudem ist die syntaktische Struktur bei der Wiederholung einfacher und um eine Informationseinheit (den Geburtsort Kopenhagen) reduziert.

Verbunden werden die erste Darstellung und die Wiederholung durch die Frage Rohdes (in literarischer Transkription):

(24)

Skal jeg tage den igen? Bare langsommere? (lacht)

‘Soll ich es wiederholen? Nur langsamer?’

Diese Frage wird im dänischen, norwegischen, schwedischen, finnischen und auch im englischen Untertitel gänzlich oder nahezu unverändert abgebildet, vgl.:

Dänischer Untertitel:

(25)

Skal jeg tage den igen? Bare langsommere?

‘Soll ich es wiederholen? Nur langsamer?’

Norwegischer Untertitel:

(26)

En gang til? Og saktere?

‘Noch einmal? Und langsamer?’

Schwedischer Untertitel:

(27)

Ska jag ta det igen, långsammare?

‘Soll ich es wiederholen, langsamer?’

Finnischer Untertitel:

(28)

Sanonko uudestaan ja hitaammin?

‘Soll ich es noch einmal und langsamer sagen?’

Englischer Untertitel:

(29)

Do you want me to repeat that? A bit slower?

Die deutsche Synchronisation hingegen fokussiert die (vermutlich) mangelnde Deutlichkeit der Artikulation:

(29)

Zu nuschelig, ja? Also deutlicher.

Und in der Tat ist Rohdes Sprechweise in der deutschen Synchronisation bei der ersten Darstellung sehr undeutlich („nuschelig“) im Hinblick auf Artikulation und Phrasierung und vom Höreindruck her in einer Weise nachlässig, die weder zur vorherigen (und folgenden) Sprechweise der Figur passt noch zur konkreten Situation; bei der Wiederholung entspricht die Artikulation hingegen dem gesprochenen Standard. Auch hier nimmt die Sprechgeschwindigkeit von der ersten Darstellung zur Wiederholung, gemessen in Silben pro Sekunde, ab, allerdings bei weitem nicht so stark wie im dänischen Originaldialog: von 7,3 σ/sek. zu 6,2 σ/sek., bei einer Gesamtdauer der Sequenz von 7,4 Sekunden. In der deutschen Synchronisation ist es vor allem die einfachere syntaktische Struktur, die die bessere Verstehbarkeit der Sachverhaltsdarstellung in der Wiederholung unterstützt:

Deutsche Synchronisation, erste Darstellung:

(30)

Ja, also, alles deutet hin auf Monique Brammer, 23 Jahre alt, geboren in Kopenhagen. Prostituierte, drogenabhängig, verschwunden vor 13 Monaten, ihre Leiche haben wir nie gefunden.

Deutsche Synchronisation, an die semikommunikativen Gegebenheiten angepasste Wiederholung:

(31)

Monique Brammer, 23 Jahre alt. Sie war Prostituierte und drogenabhängig. Verschwunden ist sie vor 13 Monaten. Ihre Leiche haben wir nie gefunden.

Die untertitelten Versionen gehen in ähnlicher Weise vor und rücken vor allem die syntaktische Vereinfachung in den Fokus. Die Reduktion von Informationen in der angepassten Wiederholung, das heißt die Nicht-Erwähnung des Geburtsorts des Opfers, wird auch im Untertitel abgebildet, so zum Beispiel im Dänischen:

Dänischer Untertitel, erste Darstellung:

(32)

Alt peger på, at det er Monique Brammer, 23 år og fra København.

Prostitueret narkoman. Hun forsvandt for 13 måneder siden og vi har aldrig fundet noget lig.

‘Alles deutet darauf hin, dass das Monique Brammer ist, 23 Jahre und von Kopenhagen.

Prostituierte und drogenabhängig. Sie verschwand vor 13 Monaten und wir haben nie eine Leiche gefunden.’

Dänischer Untertitel, an die semikommunikativen Gegebenheiten angepasste Wiederholung:

(33)

Monique Brammer, 23 år. Hun er prostitueret narkoman.

Hun forsvandt for 13 måneder siden. Vi fandt aldrig liget.

‘Monique Brammer, 23 Jahre. Sie ist Prostituierte und drogenabhängig.

Sie verschwand vor 13 Monaten. Wir haben nie die Leiche gefunden.’

Die norwegischen Untertitel gehen ganz ähnlich vor wie das Dänische, das heißt auch hier wird der Geburtsort des Opfers in der angepassten Wiederholung ausgelassen. Ausgelassen ist in der ersten Darstellung allerdings auch die Tatsache, dass das Opfer drogenabhängig war – dies wird in der Wiederholung als zusätzliche Information gegeben. Die syntaktische Vereinfachung ist jedoch weit weniger ausgeprägt als im Dänischen. Erwähnenswert ist ferner, dass der letzte Satz in der angepassten Wiederholung sogar um ein Wort länger ist als in der ersten Darstellung. Die Anpassung beziehungsweise Vereinfachung wird in den norwegischen Untertiteln somit nicht recht deutlich, was auch durch die Wortanzahl wiedergespiegelt wird (21 vs. 18).

Norwegischer Untertitel, erste Darstellung:

(34)

Det er trolig Monique Brammer. 23 år. Født i København. Prostituert.

Hun forsvant for 13 måneder siden. Vi fant ikke liket.

‘Das ist vermutlich Monique Brammer. 23 Jahre. Geboren in Kopenhagen. Prostituierte.

Sie verschwand vor 13 Monaten. Wir haben die Leiche nicht gefunden.’

Norwegischer Untertitel, an die semikommunikativen Gegebenheiten angepasste Wiederholung:

(35)

Monique Brammer. 23 år. Prostituert og narkoman.

Hun forsvant for 13 måneder siden. Vi fant aldri noe lik.

‘Monique Brammer. 23 Jahre. Prostituierte und drogenabhängig.

Sie verschwand vor 13 Monaten und wir haben nie eine Leiche gefunden.’

Der schwedische Untertitel eliminiert bereits in der ersten Darstellung den Geburtsort des Opfers, wodurch der Unterschied zwischen den beiden Versionen weitgehend verwischt. Der Untertitel zur ersten Darstellung enthält einen handwerklichen Fehler, nämlich eine Verwechslung der Sonderzeichen <å> und <ä> im Wort <nån>:

Schwedischer Untertitel, erste Darstellung:

(36)

Alt pekar på Monique Brammer – 23 år, prostituerad och narkoman.

Hon försvann för 13 månader sen och vi har aldrig hittat nän [sic! Korrekt ist: nån] kropp.

‘Alles deutet auf Monique Brammer hin – 23 Jahre, Prostituierte und drogenabhängig.

Sie verschwand vor 13 Monaten und wir haben nie eine Leiche gefunden.’

Schwedischer Untertitel, an die semikommunikativen Gegebenheiten angepasste Wiederholung:

(37)

Monique Brammer, 23 år. Prostituerad och narkoman.

Hon försvann för 13 månader sen och vi hittade ingen kropp.

‘Monique Brammer, 23 Jahre. Prostituierte und drogenabhängig.

Sie verschwand vor 13 Monaten und wir haben keine Leiche gefunden.’

Die beiden Versionen der finnischen Untertitel sind nahezu identisch. Auch hier fehlt, wie im Schwedischen, in der ersten Darstellung die Information, dass das Opfer aus Kopenhagen stammt. In der angepassten Wiederholung ist der letzte Satz sogar etwas länger und syntaktisch komplexer als in der ersten Darstellung. Ob damit die Pointe der dänisch-schwedischen Verstehensprobleme transportiert werden kann, ist fraglich, allerdings darf man beim finnischen Publikum eine gewisse Kenntnis der Problematik voraussetzen.

Finnischer Untertitel, erste Darstellung:

(38)

Ilmeisesti Monique Brammaer, 23. Prostituoitu ja narkomaani.

Hän katosi 13 kuukautta sitten. Ruumista ei löytynyt.

‘Offenbar Monique Brammer, 23 Jahre. Prostituierte und drogenabhängig.

Sie verschwand vor 13 Monaten. Die Leiche wurde nicht gefunden.’

Finnischer Untertitel, an die semikommunikativen Gegebenheiten angepasste Wiederholung:

(39)

Ilmeisesti Monique Brammaer, 23. Prostituoitu ja narkomaani.

Hän katosi 13 kuukautta sitten, mutta emme löytäneet ruumisata.

‘Offenbar Monique Brammer, 23 Jahre. Prostituierte und drogenabhängig.

Sie verschwand vor 13 Monaten, aber wir haben keine Leiche gefunden.’

In den englischen Untertiteln ist der Unterschied zwischen den beiden Versionen minimal (Relativsatz vs. Einfachsatz am Ende). Auch wenn die angepasste Wiederholung lediglich als „a bit slower“ (vgl. (29)) angekündigt worden ist, so scheint dies hier allzu wörtlich genommen zu sein, wodurch eine wesentliche Pointe der innerskandinavischen Semikommunikation verloren geht:

Englischer Untertitel, erste Darstellung:

(40)

It’s probably the 23-year-old Monique Brammer from Copenhagen.

A prostitute and an addict, that went missing 13 months ago.

Englischer Untertitel, an die semikommunikativen Gegebenheiten angepasste Wiederholung:

(41)

It’s probably the 23-year-old Monique Brammer from Copenhagen.

A prostitute and an addict. She went missing 13 months ago.

Die Beispiele zeigen bei aller Ähnlichkeit, dass im Einzelfall durchaus Unterschiede in den audiovisuellen Translationen bestehen, die ggf. zur Vermittlung der Pointe – die Schwierigkeit schwedischsprachiger Personen beim Verstehen von gesprochenem Dänisch – beitragen oder aber die Pointe verdunkeln können.

4. Schlussbemerkungen

Ob und wie weit Semikommunikation in den fünf nordischen Ländern auf Basis der skandinavischen Sprachen Dänisch, Schwedisch und Norwegisch eine echte Option für die Sprecherinnen und Sprecher darstellt oder doch einen gehörigen Anteil Ideologie enthält, diese Frage konnte und sollte in diesem Beitrag nicht geklärt werden. Außer Frage steht jedoch, dass gesprochenes Dänisch aus unterschiedlichen Gründen das größte Kommunikationsproblem darstellt, ein Umstand, der in den Sprachgemeinschaften wohlbekannt ist. Deshalb kann ein Schibboleth wie rød grød med fløde ‘rote Grütze mit Sahne’ auf unterschiedliche Weise in den skandinavischen Untertiteln, einschließlich der finnischen, verwendet werden, um dem Publikum einen Hinweise auf die entsprechenden Verstehensprobleme Dänisch-Schwedisch zu geben. Dies gelingt weder in den englischen Untertiteln, die lediglich irgendwie eine Art von Aussprachemerkwürdigkeit anzeigen, noch in der deutschen Synchronisierung, deren Strategien des phonetischen Exotismus und des „Nuschelns“ nicht unbedingt schlüssig erscheinen.

Als Forschungsperspektive für die Zukunft wäre sicherlich wünschenswert, Untersuchungen wie diese um rezipientenseitige Testungen zu erweitern, das heißt empirisch zu überprüfen, welche Charakteristika eines so kulturspezifischen Phänomens wie der innerskandinavischen Semikommunikation in der audiovisuellen Translation transportiert werden können beziehungswiese was davon vom Publikum rekonstruiert wird – oder ob und gegebenenfalls welche anderen, neuen Interpretationen vorgenommen werden.

Literatur

Agazzi, Birgitta, Catharina Grünbaum, Rikke Hauge und Mikael Reuter (2014) Guldtavlorna i gräset: Nordiskt språksamarbete. Historik och framåtblick. Helsinki.

Bandle, Oskar, Kurt Braunmüller, Ernst Hakon Jahr, Allan Karker, Hans-Peter Naumann, Ulf Telemann, Lennart Elmevik und Gun Widmark (Hrsg.) (2002/2005) The Nordic Languages, 2 Bände, Berlin und New York, Mouton de Gruyter.

Braunmüller, Kurt (2007) Die skandinavischen Sprachen im Überblick, 3. Auflage, Tübingen, Francke.

Chiaro, Delia (2009) „Issues in audiovisual translation“ in The Routledge Companion to Translation Studies, Jeremy Munday (Hrsg.), London und New York, Routledge: 141-65.

Engstrand, Olle (1999) „Swedish“ in Handbook of the International Phonetic Association: A guide to the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet, The International Phonetic Association (Hrsg.), Cambridge, Cambridge University Press: 140-142.

Geyer, Klaus (2013) „Dialektales Sprechen und Strategien zur Untertitelung in neueren Spielfilmen bayerisch-österreichischer Provenienz“ in Strömungen in der Entwicklung der Dialekte und ihrer Erforschung, Rüdiger Harnisch (Hrsg.), Regensburg, Edition Vulpes: 450-69.

---- (2015) „bochan ‘gebacken und paniert’ – (Paradoxe?) intralinguale Untertitelung im Spielfilm Indien“ in Dimensionen des Deutschen in Österreich: Variation und Varietäten im sozialen Kontext, Alexandra N. Lenz, Timo Ahlers und Manfred Glauninger (Hrsg.), Frankfurt am Main, Peter Lang: 307-20.

Gooskens, Charlotte (2006) „Hvad forstår svenskere og nordmænd bedst – engelsk eller dansk?Tidskrift for Sprogforskning 4 (1): 221-224.

---- (2007) „The Contribution of Linguistic Factors to the Intelligibility of Closely Related“ Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development 28 (6): 445-467.

----, Wilbert Heeringa und Karin Beijering (2008) „Phonetic and lexical predictors of intellegibility“ International Journal of Humanities and Arts Computing 2 (1-2): 63-81.

Grønnum, Nina (1998) „Danish“ Journal of the International Phonetic Association 28 (1 und 2): 99-105.

---- (2003) „Why are the Danes so hard to understand?“ in Take Danish – for instance: Linguistic studies in honour of Hans Basbøll presented on the occasion of his 60th birthday, 12 July 2003, Henrik Galberg Jacobsen, Dorthe Bleses, Thomas O. Madsen und Pia Thomsen (Hrsg.), Odense, Syddansk Universitetsforlag: 119-130.

Grünbaum, Catharina und Mikael Reuter (2013) Att förstå varandra i Norden, 4. Auflage, Helsinki, Nordischer Ministerrat.

Haugen, Einar (1966) „Semicommunication: The language gap in Scandinavia“ Sociological Inquiry 36: 280-297.

---- (1984) Die skandinavischen Sprachen: Eine Einführung in ihre Geschichte, Hamburg, Buske.

Herbst, Thomas (1994) Linguistische Aspekte der Synchronisation von Fernsehserien: Phonetik, Textlinguistik, Übersetzungstheorie, Tübingen, Niemeyer.

Heiss, Christine (2016) „Sprachhegemonie und der Gebrauch von Untertiteln in mehrsprachigen Filmen“ trans-kom 9 (1): 5-19.

Hurt, Christina und Brigitte Widler (1998) „Untertitelung / Übertitelung“ in Handbuch Translation, Mary Snell-Hornby, Hans G. Hönig, Paul Kußmaul und Peter A. Schmitt (Hrsg.), Tübingen, Stauffenburg: 261-263.

Jüngst, Heike E. (2010) Audiovisuelles Übersetzen: Ein Lehr und Arbeitsbuch, Tübingen, Narr.

Karker, Allan, Birgitta Lindgren und Ståle Løland (Hrsg.) Nordens språk, Oslo, Novus.

Kohler, Klaus (1999) „German“ in Handbook of the International Phonetic Association: A guide to the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet, The International Phonetic Association (Hrsg.), Cambridge, Cambridge University Press: 86-89.

Kristmannsson, Gauti (1996) „Untertitelung: eine stillose Störung?“ in Übersetzerische Kompetenz, Andreas F. Kelletat (Hrsg.), Frankfurt am Main, Peter Lang: 231-246.

Kürschner, Sebastian und Charlotte Gooskens (2011) „Verstehen nah verwandter Varietäten über Staatsgrenzen hinweg“ in Dynamik des Dialekts – Wandel und Variation: Akten des 3. Kongresses der Internationalen Gesellschaft für Dialektologie des Deutschen (IGDD), Elvira Glaser, Jürgen Erich Schmidt und Natascha Frey (Hrsg.), Stuttgart, Steiner: 159-183.

Løland, Ståle (1997) „Språkforsteåelse og språksamarbeid i Norden“ in Nordens språk, Allan Karker, Birgitta Lindgren und Ståle Løland (Hrsg.), Oslo, Novus: 20-30.

Maddieson, Ian (1984) Patterns of Sounds, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.

Pompino-Marschall, Bernd (1995) Einführung in die Phonetik. Berlin und New York, de Gruyter.

Schüppert, Anja Nanna Haug Hilton und Charlotte Gooskens (2016) „Why is Danish so difficult to understand for fellow Scandinavians?Speech Communication 79: 47-60.

Torp, Arne (2004) „Nordiske språk i fortid og nåtid“ in Nordens språk med røtter og føtter, Iben Stampe Sletten (Hrsg.), Kopenhagen: Nordischer Ministerrat: 19-74.

Uhlmann, Ulla Börestam (2005) „Interscandinavian language contact I: Internal communication and comprehensibility problems“ in The Nordic Languages, Oskar Bandle, Kurt Braunmüller, Ernst Hakon Jahr, Allan Karker, Hans-Peter Naumann, Ulf Telemann, Lennart Elmevik und Gun Widmark (Hrsg.), Band 2, Berlin und New York, Mouton de Gruyter: 2025-2032.

Vikør, Lars (2001) The Nordic languages: their status and interrelations, 3. Auflage, Oslo, Novus.

Wessén, Elias (1979) De nordiska språken, Stockholm, Almqvist & Wiksell.

Fußnoten

[1] Das Nordische Sprachsekretariat wurde 1996 wieder geschlossen und 1997 vorübergehend durch den Nordischen Sprachrat ersetzt; seit 2004 werden diverse neue, eher netzwerk- und projektorientierte Formen der internordischen Sprachzusammenarbeit ausprobiert (ausführlich hierzu Agazzi et al. 2014). Wie das Fehlen einer verlässlichen institutionellen Infrastruktur für die nordische Sprachzusammenarbeit mit der beobachtbaren Abnahme an Semikommunikationsfähigkeiten und -bereitschaft vor allem junger Menschen in den nordischen Ländern in Verbindung zu bringen ist, kann hier nicht geklärt werden.

[2] Die dänischen Zahlwörter unterscheiden sich von den norwegischen und schwedischen zum einen dadurch, dass sie im Zahlenraum 20-100 zuerst die Einerzahlen und dann die Zehnerzahlen nennen, z.B. to-og-tyve ‘zwei-und-zwanzig’ (also wie das Deutsche), während die anderen Sprachen der Reihenfolge Zehnerzahl – Einerzahl folgen, zum Beispiel schwedisch tjugo-två ‘zwanzig-zwei’ (wie auch das Englische, twenty-two). Zum anderen sind die Wörter für die Zehnerzahlen von 50 bis 90 nach einem Zwanziger-System gebildet (vgl. französisch quatre-vingts ‘80, lit. 4 x 20’): treds < tresindstyve ‘3 x 20’ heißt 60, halvtreds < halvtresindstyve ‘½ 3. x 20, halbdritt mal zwanzig’, entspricht zweieinhalb mal zwanzig, also 50.

[3] Entgegen manchen Darstellungen handelt es sich bei dem so genannten „weichen d“ nicht um einen Frikativ – vgl. detailliert zum Beispiel Grønnum (1998: 101).

[4] Einen etwas anderen Stellenwert kann man der Translationsdiskussion bei Informationsformaten zuschreiben, wenn der Originalton beispielsweise von Politikerinnen und Politikern durchaus von Interesse ist; darum geht es hier aber nicht.

[5] Vgl. zum Beispiel die Diskussion der Kritik an der Synchronisation bei Jüngst (2010: Kap. 3.3), die Auseinandersetzung mit den Vor- und Nachteilen von Synchronisation und Untertitelung bei Chiaro (2009) oder die kritische Analyse der Qualität synchronisierter Texte (in Fernsehserien) bei Herbst (1994).

[6] Eine alternative Formulierung mit identischer Funktion ist røgede ørreder ‘geräucherte Forellen’, ebenfalls mit dentalem Approximant und gerundeten Vordervokalen.

[7] Es existiert eine feste Wendung det floder, lit. ‘es flutet’, das heißt ‘die Flut steigt’ oder ‘es ist Flut’, mit finitem Verb; daraus rekonstruierbar ist der Infinitiv flode ‘fluten’ – der aber in den Wörterbüchern nicht verzeichnet ist.

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"Semikommunikation als Herausforderung für audiovisuelle Translation: die skandinavische Krimi-Miniserie Broen – Bron ('Die Brücke')"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2461

Ideological dimensions of linguistic hybridity in Ukrainian theatre translation

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Abstract & Keywords

Dialects and hybrid languages have been viewed as a primary translation challenge in cross-cultural writings. Although in-depth studies have yielded valuable insight into translation strategies applicable to both, they have largely overlooked the correlation between dialects and hybrid languages as possible translation tools in target polysystems. The primary objective of this paper is to research how dominant ideologies in a given receiving culture may modify theatre translation strategies and to monitor the prevailing attitude towards linguistic hybridity in the case study of Ukrainian theatre translation. To attain the major goal, I seek to provide background to how the concepts of dialects and hybrid languages have been interpreted in cross-disciplinary studies and to explore ongoing theoretical reflection on the notion of ideology with a view to defining its role in the translation process. Methodologically, the research is broadly informed by descriptive and target culture-oriented translation theories, postcolonial studies, and sociolinguistics. In addition, I address the potentialities of multimodal critical discourse analysis. The empirical part offers a comprehensive sociolinguistic profile of the postcolonial Ukrainian state, focuses on various manifestations of linguistic hybridity in theatre discourse in Ukraine, and follows the growing impact of nation-building ideology on dialects and hybrid languages in theatre translation.

Keywords: dialect, hybrid language, ideology, linguistic hybridity, multimodal discourse, theatre translation

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"Ideological dimensions of linguistic hybridity in Ukrainian theatre translation"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2460

 1. Introduction

While linguistic hybridity has been a widely circulating notion in postcolonial studies and has been viewed as a major challenge in cross-cultural writings (Klinger 2014) in parallel with regional and social dialects, few scholars have explicitly theorized the concept within theatre translation studies. The challenge is twofold: on the one hand, the elements of a hybrid language are fairly often present in the original theatre texts and therefore need to be adequately reproduced by means of a target language; on the other hand, a hybrid language may be an instrument of interpersonal communication within a particular community, in which case it has a perfect right to be regarded as a possible source of stereotyped linguistic patterns to be used in theatre translation.

Retrospective examination of translation studies papers concerned with hybrid languages shows that attention has been devoted to translating from hybrid languages (Consiglio 2008), in particular in the context of postcolonial translation (Collins 2010; Bandia 1996). In this case, translation strategies are remarkably similar to those which are typically used for translating dialects. Meanwhile, a comprehensive view of translating into hybrid languages cannot be formed due to the lack of critical attention paid to it. In an attempt to break the deadlock, the present paper signals a new orientation in theatre translation studies and seeks to reflect on the possibilities of using a hybrid language or its elements in translation. The interest to this question has been prompted by the role played by standard and non-standard languages in Ukrainian original and translated theatre, which has drawn attention to the necessity for new ways of thinking about the role of ideology in theatre practices. Thus, my primary objective is to research how dominant ideologies in a receiving culture modify strategies in theatre translation and to monitor the prevailing attitude towards linguistic hybridity in the case study of Ukrainian theatre translation. To attain the major goal, I seek to provide background to how the concepts of dialects and hybrid languages have been interpreted in cross-disciplinary studies. There is a direct connection between dialects and hybrid languages in that respect that both language varieties are traditionally opposed to a standard language and often have a lower social status. Therefore, it is no overstatement to assert that they tend to perform similar functions in theatre discourse.

The study also attempts to crystallize those ideological factors, which influence translators’ choices in the process of theatre translation by exploring ongoing theoretical reflection on the notion of ideology. This implies that the research is informed primarily by interdisciplinary scholarship related to descriptive and target culture-oriented translation theories, postcolonial studies, and sociolinguistics. In addition, the self-evident duality of theatre translation invites an integrated theoretical approach, which has respect to its multimodal nature. Therefore, I consistently address the potentialities of multimodal critical discourse analysis. The empirical part offers a comprehensive sociolinguistic profile of the postcolonial Ukrainian state, focuses on various manifestations of linguistic hybridity in theatre discourse, and follows the impact of ideology on dialects and hybrid languages in theatre translation in Ukraine. The initial hypothesis is that being socially sensitive linguistic phenomena, dialects and hybrid languages applied in translation may serve as reliable detecting elements in tracing the influence of ideology as a powerful instrument of framing and shaping theatre translation practices.

2. Corpus collection and research methods

This study is based on the analysis of the comprehensive database, which includes a wide range of translated theatre texts and recordings of the performances produced by Ukrainian theatres over the last two decades. These are English-Ukrainian or English-Russian-Ukrainian translations of postmodern plays written in English. As the concept of postmodernity is not considered as such, it is viewed as a chronological landmark to label the plays written after the Second World War in the English-speaking countries. Interestingly, the ideas of postmodernity started penetrating into post-Soviet states after the fall of the Iron Curtain, which triggered the interest to previously forbidden Western plays and urged the translators to cater for the need of Ukrainian theatres to stage the epoch-making masterpieces. The main criterion to have guided the selection of plays for the analysis was the availability of the Ukrainian translation. As the aim of the study is to test the hypothesis about the influence of ideology on theatre translation, there is a need to compile a sufficiently large corpus. In total, the database contains 34 original plays written in English, seven translations into Russian and their re-translations into Ukrainian, 31 translations into Ukrainian (four plays were translated twice by different translators), and 11 recordings of staged Ukrainian translations. Recorded performances posed a great value as they conferred a possibility to compare, where applicable, the initially written translation with its final stage version and to mark the transformations that have occurred. In this respect, it is vital to stress that in the process of research I was widely making use of the software for processing multimodal files. ANVIL, a video annotation tool, was used as an instrument for managing the corpora of annotation files.

Although the empirical study formed the cornerstone of this inquiry, in this paper I have only presented the conclusions, which followed the detailed analysis of previously collected data. It stems from the fact that the conclusions have been drawn on the basis of the thorough assessment of thirty-four original plays and their translations in two languages and two modes. The other reason is that I have already discussed some intermediate results of the research in my previous papers (Halas 2010; Halas 2015), in which I have provided a detailed analysis of dialect translation methods used in Ukrainian theatre translation. This article, for its part, seeks to put forward some resulting generalizations, which might be thought-provoking for international academia. I have included some key aspects of the relevant case studies to provide illustrations to my ideas.

Methodologically, the research is informed by descriptive and target culture-oriented translation theories, postcolonial studies, and sociolinguistics, for whose concepts I will hold a full-fledged debate in the following section. Additionally, I have applied some anthropological methods, namely the method of thick description (Geertz 1973), to offer a larger national context in which dialects and hybrid language invariants function; the methods of critical discourse analysis (Wodak and Meyer 2009; Fairclough 2010) in order to follow what impact dominant ideologies have on translation strategies; methods of multimodal critical discourse analysis (Kress 2010; van Leeuwen 2013), which facilitate the holistic study of multifarious semiotic modes operating in theatre translation.

3. Conceptual framework

Before embarking on the examination of ideological dimensions of linguistic hybridity in theatre translation, this section offers a conceptual canvas and defines the general stock of theoretical concepts underpinning the present study. More specifically, I will be tracking the correlation between such core concepts as dialects, hybrid languages (linguistic hybridity), and ideology and how they interact. In the face of theoretical diffusion in current interdisciplinary terminology, it is hardly possible to provide the unified conceptualization of these highly debatable terms. Therefore, it seems pertinent to prioritize those approaches which bring their sociolinguistic and postcolonial sides to the fore. Nevertheless, as such a narrowed perspective runs the grave risk of over-simplifying them, I will also speculate on other interpretations where applicable.

In-depth and extensive research into dialect has supposedly made it the least controversial of the concepts relevant for the present study. Although a myriad of interdisciplinary papers offers their vision of dialects, their attitudes are not fundamentally opposing or conflicting. From the standpoint of sociolinguistics, a dialect is conventionally viewed as describing ‘the speech habits (pronunciation, lexicon, grammar, pragmatics) characteristic of a geographical area or region, or of a specific social group.’ (Swann et al. 2004; 76). Thus, commonly distinguished regional and social dialects are contrasted with supra-regional standard language, which has emerged historically from one or several dialects. Standard variety is associated with higher prestige, whereas dialectal varieties are regarded as either geographically or socially peripheral. Speakers of the standard language variety tend to treat people from remote regions or the lowest stratum of society with utter disdain. The latter often become objects of mockery in public sphere, which is subsequently reflected in pieces written for the theatre.

In many instances, the organization of language can be defined as a graded continuum consisting of chains of mutually intelligible lects. The dividing line between a standard language and a dialect, as Romaine (2001: 311) rightly states, is often a matter of political power and the sovereignty of a nation-state.  It invites the assumption that the way standard languages and dialects are distinguished is predominantly socially and politically biased, most notably, in those states where the processes of linguistic standardization are far from being completed. In this respect, Mesthrie (2009: 65) notes that traditional dialectology has largely ignored processes like colonisation. It is true that it is by far more challenging to study dialects in postcolonial settings with erratic language contacts than to deal with ‘pure’ dialects of long-established language communities. In postcolonial context, difficulties arise when an attempt is made to draw a clear line between a dialect and a hybrid language. While genuine linguistic markers may not be hard to trace, the efforts are likely to prove futile in distinguishing the functions of these language varieties in a particular regional and social milieu.

How does a hybrid language relate to a dialect? The term linguistic hybridity is ambiguous and loose; thus, it resists any straightforward definition. It is nothing new to say that the concept of linguistic hybridity has become a rigorous analytical tool in discourse and genre analysis after being introduced by Bakhtin (1981) to delineate how language can be double-voiced. From a Bakhtinian perspective, a hybrid is ‘an utterance that belongs, by its grammatical (syntactic) and compositional marks, to a single speaker, but that actually contains mixed within it two utterances, two speech manners, two styles, two “languages”, two semantic and axiological belief systems’. (Bakhtin 1981: 304). Such interpretation of hybridity stems from the observation of social and linguistic patterns of behaviour practiced by the same person in the context of a literary work. It proves widely applicable to the analysis of theatre translation in case the linguistic identity of an individual character is the central focus of attention. My primary goal lies elsewhere, in particular in the realms of target system ideology that goes far beyond the literary analysis of a theatre text.

Being interpreted in a purely sociolinguistic context, a hybrid language is equal in meaning to a mixed language, which is ‘the result of two identifiable source languages, normally in situations of community bilingualism’ (Meakins 2013: 159). Other terms are contact language, intertwined language, and fusion language, while creole and pidgin are often viewed as would-be mixed languages. Auer (1999) suggested a typology of language interaction: code-switching, language mixing, and fused lects, which should be regarded as certain points of the continuum in which codeswitching and fused lects are two extremes. Thus, the code-switching of bilingual people, who are well aware of two different codes they use, is believed to be the first step towards linguistic hybridity.  As Myers-Scotton (2002, 2006) states, codeswitching is volitional and discourse-related, while in language mixing determining the language of communication is hardly possible. At the final stage of fused lect, the speaker uses a mixed language as a major code (Auer 1999). Viewed in this way, a hybrid language is a linguistic variety similar in its nature to other lects, such as regiolect, sociolect, ethnolect, genderlect, idiolect, and so on.

It should be highlighted that in its understanding of hybridity, this paper is also profoundly indebted to The third space: Interview with Homi Bhabha (1990) and Bhabha’s seminal work The Location of Culture (1994) which introduced the idea of hybridity into postcolonial studies defining this third space and in-between as a setting for a postcolonial society. Bhabha explains: ‘For me the importance of hybridity is not to be able to trace two original moments from which the third emerges; rather hybridity to me is the “third space” which enables other positions to emerge. This third space displaces the histories that constitute it, and sets up new structures of authority, new political initiatives, which are inadequately understood through received wisdom’ (Bhabha 1994: 211). Thus, the ‘third space’ is a kernel idea of hybridity. As Huddart (2005: 126-127) stresses, for Bhabha this ‘third space’ is not a result of two ‘pure’ positions brought together and its structure is not merely logical. From this perspective, linguistic hybridity might be viewed as the ‘third space’ where the linguistic practices of the coloniser and the colonised collide, contact, and possibly merge. It is precisely this interpretation which foregrounds the analysis of the role of ideology in theatre translation in Ukraine as a postcolonial state. Further to the above, I would like to emphasize that being fully cognizant of underlying linguistic distinctions between hybrid languages and dialects, I suggest that a more nuanced understanding and interpretation of their correlation in a particular cultural setting may prove highly beneficial.

These considerations lead to the final concept to be defined in this section: what ideology is and how it contributes to target culture norms regulating the use of standard languages, dialects, and hybrid languages in theatre discourse and theatre translation in particular. Following the subsequent ‘cultural’, ‘social’, and ‘political’ turns in translation studies experienced in the 1990s, ideology has become increasingly central to research agenda (Calzada-Pérez 2014; Munday 2013; Tymoczko 2003; Venuti 1992).  Despite the fact that it has emerged as a pivotal issue in the current debate inside academia and far beyond, it still remains an ‘elusive concept that escapes an easy definition’ (Rojo López 2014: 249). As Geertz (1973: 5) argues: ‘Eclecticism is self-defeating not because there is only one direction in which it is useful to move, but because there are so many: it is necessary to choose.’ Thus, by offering a brief review of existing views on ideology, I strive towards finding such an interpretation of ideology that will be applicable to translation activity. 

According to van Dijk (1998: 2), laypersons often interpret the notion of 'ideology' as ‘a system of wrong, false, distorted or otherwise misguided beliefs, typically associated with our social or political opponents’. Further still, he emphasizes that few of ‘us’ describe our own belief systems as ‘ideologies’, by which we traditionally mean someone else’s convictions: ‘Ours is the Truth, Theirs is the Ideology’. When social analysts provide a definition for ideology, they tend to define it in broad terms, including values, beliefs, and attitudes (Jost 2006; Tedin 1987). Following on from these considerations, one might come to a reasonable conclusion that ideology has to do with knowledge about undisputed facts, past experiences, personal preferences, mundane facts of everyday life or fictional facts, which is not the case (van Dijk 1998: 28). Thus, van Dijk suggests that one should not discard the fact that ideologies traditionally ‘belong to the realm of social beliefs’ and are ‘located in social memory’ (idem: 29), which makes ideology a social belief system. He makes it clear that ideologies are to be defined as ideologies of groups that may be individually practiced by group members (idem: 30). Another point to consider is that ideology features evaluative beliefs (idem: 33), which brings some highly subjective overtones to the ideological interpretation of reality. Therefore, a broad-based approach to the concept of ideology that I espouse is the one by Luke (2001: 559): ‘systems of ideas, beliefs, practices, and representations which operate in the interests of an identifiable social class or cultural group.’ It does not preclude the resort to other, more specific meanings of ideology, which are relevant to the discussion. What follows is concerned with political ideology and linguistic ideology.

As Martin (2015: 11) observes, some theorists argue that all ideology is political by nature. Meanwhile, he favours a narrower conception of political ideology referring to ‘processes and institutions turning on the quest to control the state machinery’ (ibid: 11). Political ideologies can offer certain ideas on what they believe to be the best form of government (democracy, autocracy, totalitarianism, and so on) or the best system of economic relations (capitalism, socialism, and so on). In addition, they may develop fundamental doctrines and principles to regulate different types of social activities, including linguistic activities. Language ideology, in its broad sense, stands for shared beliefs about language in the context of sociocultural values which often serve for rationalisation of social structures and dominant linguistic habits (Swann et al. 2004: 171). In practical terms, language ideology implies that standard language variety used by groups with higher social status is conventionally associated with scholarship and refinement; meanwhile, non-standard varieties are believed to be vulgar and crude. In Bilaniuk’s (1997: 105) view, it reflects people’s overt and implicit beliefs about what language is and what forms may be used in different contexts. These beliefs may be either overtly expressed in statements about language or may be implicit in people’s reactions to speakers of particular language varieties. In certain social and political contexts, political ideology and language ideology appear to be deeply intertwined which is evidenced in language policy and language planning. According to Bernsand (2001: 39), the analysis of language ideology ‘makes it possible to understand the processes that give social meaning to language forms and shape notions on the relationship of language identities’.

4. Ukraine’s sociolinguistic profile through the lens of postcoloniality

In their majority, Ukrainian scholars evince considerable interest in the concepts of postcolonial studies, although some have been apparently reluctant to define the Ukrainian-Russian relationships in terms of postcoloniality. The assumption underlying their conviction is that Ukraine had never been Russia’s colony in a traditional sense of the word. While it is hardly possible to refute this claim on the whole, it may prove perfectly feasible to apply some relevant premises of the postcolonial theory to the analysis of the sociolinguistic situation in Ukraine. In this respect, this paper clearly supports Ryabchuk’s (2010) advocacy for regarding Russian-Ukrainian asymmetric relations as an inherent conflict of two discourses – ‘the discourse of imperial dominance and the discourse of national/nationalistic resistance and liberation’ (idem: 7). To support the suggested explanation, it would be helpful to discuss some key aspects of the common history of the two nations.

Ukraine is rooted in the powerful medieval state of Kyivan Rus which disintegrated in the thirteenth century. Since then, some parts of it were consecutively ruled by the Golden Horde, the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, the Kingdom of Poland, and the Crimean Khanate. Following a rebellion against the Polish dominance in 1648 and the Treaty of Pereyaslav in 1654, a sizable portion of Ukraine’s lands came under Russian rule to be later divided between the Tsardom of Russia and Habsburg Austria. After the Russian Revolution in 1917, the Ukrainian Bolsheviks created the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic as an integral part of Russia-dominated Soviet Union. Finally, after the end of the Second World War Ukraine’s territory was enlarged westward and included Ukrainian ethnic territories formerly controlled by the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Being a stateless nation torn apart between mighty empires, Ukrainians were united by common language spread throughout their ethnic, predominantly rural, territories. In this context, Bernsand (2001: 39) maintains that the Ukrainian nation ‘has been conceptualised mainly through its language’. As a result, the ‘romantic notions on the essentiality of nations and languages’ has been traditionally ‘accepted on a common-sense basis’.  

The Ukrainian language struggled to survive over the years of imperial dominance. It lived through the 1863 Valuyev Circular, a decree suspending the publication of religious and educational texts in Ukrainian, and no less than 134 other regulatory and suppressive decrees that forced it out of public use. The artificially induced dominance of the Russian language peaked during the Soviet rule, as the Soviet Union had meticulous language planning aimed at unifying the core set of vocabulary in all national languages of the Soviet Republics. Although it was officially declared that Ukrainian and Russian were two distinct closely-related languages, attempts were made to erase the boundaries between them. Universal grammatical constructions and word choice were imposed to conform to Soviet language ideology. In the processes of Ukrainian dictionary compiling, linguists were forced to choose those variants which were closer to Russian rather than Polish or any of Western Ukrainian dialects. In the established linguistic hierarchy, Russian was the language of economic and social mobility, while Ukrainian was considered a rural language. Nonetheless, it is often suggested that owing to the speakers of Ukrainian from the rural areas, the Ukrainian language was saved from imminent extinction. Ukrainian, as it is currently spoken, still bears scars from continuous linguistic repressions.

Since Ukraine’s independence proclaimed in 1991, Ukrainian has been the only official language of the state. It does not mean to say, though, that the Russian language has readily ceded ground to the Ukrainian language in public domain. Conversely, following a short massive upsurge of Ukrainisation, which immediately followed the declaration of independence, Russian gradually regained its dominant status, particularly in the Republic of Crimea and the urban areas of the Donbas Region. Subsequently, predominantly Russian-speaking Crimea was annexed by the Russian Federation and Donbas became the battlefield in the war unleashed by it. Allegedly, language conflict played a key role in triggering the military actions. Following the loss of control over these territories, Ukraine’s officials pursued a new language policy, which was meant to attach high social standing to the Ukrainian language, whereas Russian was assigned the status of a minority language. Spolsky suggests that postcolonial states have three options for language policy: to reject the metropolitan language and to proclaim the national language as the only official language; to have both the metropolitan and the national languages as official ones; to recognize the hegemony of the colonial language (Spolsky 2004: 137). It seems fairly obvious that these processes last for an extended period. Even though Ukraine has now made its ultimate choice in favour of rejecting the metropolitan language, eventual language shift may take time.

In tracing the crucial connection between two standard language varieties (Ukrainian and Russian), it is necessary to consider their non-standard counterparts and their social and political status. Regional dialects and subdialects in Ukraine are traditionally divided into three major groups: Northern group (Eastern Polissian, Central Polissian, West Polissian), South-eastern group (Middle Dnieprian, Slobozhan, Steppe), and South-western group (Podillian, Volynian, Upper Dniestrian, Pokuttia, Hutsul, Boyko, Lemko, Rusyn). The complex linguistic nature of these dialects may provide insight into the way they have been developing throughout the turbulent years of Ukraine’s colonial history. Among other things, West Polissian dialects manifest elements of both Belarus and Polish grammar and vocabulary, while the distinguishing characteristics of Upper Dniestrian subdialect are the influence of Polish and German vocabulary, which is reminiscent of the Austro-Hungarian rule. Pokuttia subdialect has some distinct vocabulary borrowed from Romanian, whereas Rusyn is often considered to be a separate language (Comrie 1992). The South-eastern group (on which the national standard is based) ‘represents what is historically the most authentic variety of the language, that is to say, the one variety that does not form a transition to a neighbouring Slavonic language’ (Hull and Koscharsky 2006). 

It would be surprising if colonialism would not have left any tangible traces of imperialistic presence. As it might be expected, the pressure to speak Russian produced hybrid forms, known as Surzhyk. There is no agreed definition or clear consensus on ‘whether it is a single variety or a system of contact phenomena ranging from lexical borrowing to code-switching or to language mixing’. (Kent 2010: 38). Some researchers (Flier 1998; Stavytska and Trub 2007) believe that there is one linguistic variety that may be termed Surzhyk. Others (Bilaniuk 2004) insist on a more detailed classification: ‘urbanized peasant Surzhyk’, which blends Ukrainian and Russian on all levels and emerges as a result of industrialisation; ‘village dialect Surzhyk’, which results from Ukrainian peasants coming into contact with Russian-speaking administrators; ‘Sovietized Ukrainian Surzhyk’, which appeared as a result of forceful substitution of the Ukrainian words by corresponding Russian ones; ‘habitual language mixing’ by bilinguals; ‘post-independence Surzhyk’, which is a recent phenomenon related to the attempts of Russian-speaking adults to speak Ukrainian as an official language. Finally, the third group (Serbenska 1994; Masenko 2008) regards Surzhyk not as a separate language, but as an ad hoc combination of Ukrainian and Russian elements without any internally consistent structure (Kent 2010).

Any clear-cut division of this linguistic continuum into distinguishable varieties would be arbitrary as there is no particular point where one variety begins and the other finishes. In fact, Surzhyk is a mixture of two standard languages (Ukrainian and Russian) and, in addition, different regional dialects of the Ukrainian language. It is noteworthy that many speakers use different varieties of language continuum and shift between them depending on context or addressee. Surzhyk can be heard in different parts of Ukraine where Russian and Ukrainian interact, although it certainly has its distinctive nature in each region. Nonetheless, it cannot be directly equated with a regional dialect, as there is no particular Surzhyk-speaking region in Ukraine. Neither can be identified as a full-fledged social dialect; yet, some linguists do define Surzhyk as a social dialect (Flier 2000). Having said that, I would argue that Surzhyk shares a range of features with ‘low’ social dialects. As there is no other formally defined ‘low’ social dialect in Ukraine, the types of Surzhyk defined by Bilaniuk as ‘urbanized peasant Surzhyk’ and ‘village dialect Surzhyk’ often appear to function as such. First, users of Surzhyk are often liminalised and marginalised for being poorly educated. Their parochialism manifests itself in non-standard forms on the phonetic, phonological, lexical, syntactic, and semantic levels. In case Surzhyk-speaking individuals happen to join the so-called educated upper-class, they strive to adapt their language habits to the norms of the new linguistic environment. Second, these people traditionally represent a particular socioeconomic group engaged in manual or unskilled labour. Finally, the linguistic characteristics typical for Surzhyk come down from generation to generation, often modified in response to changes in language and political ideologies. Thus, social status, as well as regional background, tend to be instrumental when evaluating and judging other people based on their linguistic competence.

On the whole, the public use of Surzhyk faces belligerent criticism on the part of Ukrainian intellectual elite. It should not go unnoticed, though, that its positive function has also been emphasized. Some researchers believe that by being linked to national archetypes (Stavytska and Trub 2007), the available Ukrainian elements helped the Ukrainian language not to fall into oblivion (Fuderer 2011). On the other hand, the idea that ‘hybridity is celebrated and privileged as a kind of superior cultural intelligence owing to the advantage of ‘in-betweenness”, the straddling of two cultures and the subsequent ability to “negotiate the difference” (Hoogvelt 1997: 158) is neither shared nor welcomed in Ukrainian postcolonial discourse.

Ashcroft, Griffiths, and Tiffin (2006) maintain that once hybridity becomes rooted in particular postcolonial societies in the aftermath of economic and political expansion, it extends through its cultural, linguistic, and political manifestations even after the period of colonisation. Presently, incomplete standardization of the Ukrainian language still leads to striking language variation in some public spheres. Its hybrid linguistic repertoire may be normalized either through widely established social practices or institutionalised by state authorities. Whether or not it can develop into a full-fledged language is largely a matter of ideology. In Ukraine, it is assumed that current language ideology is the ideology of language purism aimed at increasing the number of Ukrainian-speaking citizens and to accomplish the standardisation.

5. Theatre translation and the ideology of language purism in Ukraine

Recent developments in theatre translation have undoubtedly generated significant new foci of analysis with linguistic challenges of postmodern theatre being among them. It could not be denied that postcolonial changes, successive waves of immigration, and continual breakdown of the barriers separating different social groups led to a new phenomenon in postmodern theatre, in which previously marginalized voices and identities became the most prominent. Language is believed to be a site of struggle for identity and social values. It adequately explains why various types of lects have become signature moves of postmodern playwrights in constructing identities of their characters. In a similar vein, it offers insight into why these lects have posed a truly vexing problem for theatre translators worldwide. Translation as a social practice forms one of the cornerstones of this inquiry: it can be viewed as one of the instruments of maintaining, shaping, resisting, and challenging dominant ideologies in target cultures. Thus, it is important to track the instances of translation which highlight the role of ideology in defining translator’s strategies. From this perspective, little attention has been devoted to the impact of current ideology on the translation of and into dialects and hybrid languages in Ukrainian theatres.  

By and large, the tradition of theatre translation in Ukraine is far from being long-established and deep-rooted. The centuries of colonial dependence and the bitter experience of Soviet totalitarianism over decades preceding its independence sent it back to point zero. One should not discard the fact that the Soviet Union had severe prescriptive paradigms of public conduct and strict censorship. Inasmuch as all social, linguistic, and cultural activities were carefully coordinated, translation norms were centrally imposed on theatre translation. In practice, it meant that foreign plays, which were to be translated, were thoroughly inspected with a view to tracing any elements of ‘bourgeois ideology’. In case such elements were detected, the play could not be translated. If the play included some minor deviations from the Soviet norms of public conduct, translators were strongly encouraged to normalize the unwanted linguistic units. As theatre was believed to be ‘the temple of arts’, the non-standard language on stage would desecrate it. Furthermore, the majority of permitted plays were translated into Russian, while Ukrainian was restricted to several classical Ukrainian plays depicting peasants’ lives. Such a misbalance gave rise to a persistent myth that the Ukrainian language does not have sufficient linguistic resources for translating sophisticated postmodern plays.

Following on from these considerations, it is becoming reasonably clear why theatre translation in Ukraine had not developed any consistent practices prior to its independence in 1991. By the same token, it might be naturally assumed that chaotic development of the theatre over subsequent years was not able to offer any coherent translation strategies. After the fall of the Iron Curtain, freedom of speech unleashed insatiable curiosity in foreign postmodern drama, which burst into Ukrainian theatres in a rather erratic manner, as a vehicle of liberation from the stifling totalitarian mind-set. Lack of established contacts with foreign literary agents and poorly developed copyright legislation led to unmanageable and unmonitored translation practices. Facing large financial challenges, theatre directors and actors assumed the role of translators, editors, and co-authors. After the collapse of the Soviet Union and the rise of new Ukrainian theatre, it became a hegemonic practice to translate foreign plays into Ukrainian from available Russian translations. The situation has gradually improved. Currently, translations from Russian are still being practised at small-scale provincial theatres. As the phenomenon of mediated translation has become an integral part of Ukrainian theatre system, it cannot be left unattended. Therefore, prior to taking a closer look at English-Ukrainian translations of theatre texts, I will offer some general insights regarding the practice of indirect translation. 

The analysis of mediated translations lends an additional perspective to Ukrainian-Russian language contacts in the context of translating into standard and hybrid languages. My first immediate observation is that the degree of distortion in translation is much higher when a play is re-translated from translation. In quantitative terms, in seven plays translated from English into Russian and then from Russian into Ukrainian, 100 per cent of all mistranslations, which were noticed in the Russian variant, were subsequently found in the Ukrainian text. In addition, the translators made 45 semantic mistakes in total (ranging from two to ten in each translation) while translating the Russian text into Ukrainian, which were caused either by the miscomprehension of ideas or by the choice of a wrong word in Ukrainian. Finally, as all the translations in question were made by amateur translators, the interference of the Russian language into the Ukrainian text, in particularly on a syntactic level, was pervasive. This way, linguistic hybridity was introduced to translations unwillingly and unconsciously. However, it should be emphasized that multimodal analysis of four recorded plays, which were available for the study, revealed that some elements of resulting Russian-Ukrainian hybrid structures were eliminated in the process of rehearsal, while some others were not included in the final stage version.

The following key finding relates to the fluency and coherence of speech, which is often viewed as major assessment criteria in the theatre translation quality analysis. As it might be expected, in their re-translations, the Ukrainian translators were firmly guided by the choices in the Russian translations. Hence, the resulting texts are often stylistically inconsistent, heterogeneous and even eclectic. When these texts are performed on stage, actors often struggle hard to enunciate non-natural wordings and artificial syntactic constructions, which makes their speech sound rather far-fetched. It may compel unwanted attention and interrupt the natural flow of events on stage.

In recent years, this tide has been gradually falling with more and more theatres suspending the practice of using re-translations for their performances. The reasons behind this shift are manifold. First, the theatrical system has accumulated a considerable number of translations into Ukrainian, which began to circulate freely amongst theatrical communities. Although translated plays are still rarely published, the Ukrainian Agency of Copyright and Related Rights holds the information about the works officially translated into Ukrainian and thus may be used in theatre productions. Second, translation quality has become a major concern: mediocre translations will no longer suffice increasingly demanding audiences. Finally, the continuing conflict with the Russian Federation has had the far-reaching implications for the status of the Russian language in Ukraine. It has triggered a new wave of language patriotism contributing to the expansion in the number of professional translations into Ukrainian.

I maintain that professional theatre translation is an accurate representation of current dominant language ideology in Ukraine. Ukrainian scholars, writers, and other cultural agents have been arguing for the necessity of reviving the pure and genuine language in order to revive the nation (Hojan 1991; Panko 1991), as the processes of standardization and legitimation of one language variety are crucial for nation-building projects. Shifting socio-cultural environment demands the establishment of a new standard variety of the Ukrainian language, which would functionally operate in all the spheres of life. Spolsky holds the view that pure and incorrupt language is ‘highly valued ideologically’ (Spolsky 2004: 22). He suggests that language purism becomes crucially important during a time of language cultivation when native sources are strongly favoured (Annamalai 1989). This way, the pervasive discourse of linguistic purism seems to have penetrated deep into all spheres of life. Since the purist attitude tends to reject any aspects of language that would relate it to low social status or postcolonial hybridity, it marginalises and stigmatises any manifestations of non-standard linguistic behaviour. Moreover, linguistic anomalies are often viewed as symptoms of a degrading identity. For apparent reasons, any implicit threat to the national identity of Ukrainians is mitigated by efforts to avoid linguistic deviations whenever possible. It explains why surzhyk, as a Russian-Ukrainian hybrid language, is rarely introduced into translated theatre texts. Prevailing purism should not be ascribed only to postcolonial identity threat. If such were the case, regional dialects would be welcomed in translations as a perfect vehicle for national identity, which is not in common practice. The key to this outright rejection lies elsewhere and must be approached in a context-dependent way.

Based on a comparative analysis of the data collected from a variety of sources, the study examines which methods of translating lects are prevalent.  The following classification has been viewed as a point of departure for a broader discussion: compilation, pseudo-dialect, parallel dialect, localization, standardization (Perteghella 2002), and reconstruction of the communicative situation (Halas 2010). Compilation presupposes mixing of several dialects or idioms of the target language; pseudo-dialect suggests creating an artificial dialect based on substandard elements and accents; parallel dialect involves a certain dialect in the target culture which performs similar function and has corresponding connotative loading; localization allows for total domestication of the work including its anthroponymic and toponymic systems; standardization calls for elimination of all dialectal elements; reconstruction of communicative situation is efficient for documentary and verbatim plays.

At a first glance, a method a theatre translator chooses may largely seem a matter of personal preference. Meanwhile, once certain discourse factors have been unveiled, a fuller picture is beginning to emerge. The findings suggest that standardization and pseudo-dialect are the methods of first resort in Ukrainian theatre translation, representing 33 and 39 per cent correspondingly. The resort to standardization method has well-reasoned grounds. As Erkazanci (2009: 241) contends, in the countries where standardization is circulating through discourses, translators tend to develop a linguistic habitus. They initiate self-censorship so that ‘an external governing force becomes an internal governing agent’ (Erkazanci 2009: 247). Gradually, linguistic habitus transforms a decision-making process into an automatic mode, in which ideologically accommodated linguistic choices spring to mind beyond volition. It gives a key to understanding why professional translators take a cautious mind while facing the challenges of dialect translation. The mainstream discourse of linguistic purity, of which translators are an organic part, imposes certain restrictions; thus, it requires considerable dexterity to go against the stream. On the other hand, when the dialect is nothing but a mode of natural communication in a play and the author did not mean to emphasize the linguistic identity, there is no need to exert every effort in order to show the otherness and to protrude substandard linguistic features. That being the case, it makes sense to consider standardization as a preferred method.

Pseudo-dialects in available theatre translations tend to combine different elements of substandard language varieties, such as colloquialisms and jargon, which are introduced with the intention to imitate the sociolects of marginalized characters and to maintain the opposition of characters’ social status within a play. While this strategy proves effective for translating sociolects, it fails to represent regional varieties to the full extent. When performed on stage, many translated texts came through remarkable phonetic transformations in an attempt to imitate the speech of low social classes. In view of the fact that there are no clearly defined social dialects of the Ukrainian language, the imitation of cacology typical for Surzhyk-speaking people produces the desired effect of marginalization. It may be reinforced by the pitch of a voice, facial expression, posture, proximity to the interlocutor, and other kinaesthetic potentialities, which the multimodal space of theatre has to offer. Thus, linguistic hybridity is occasionally used as a way to show the inferiority of a character; however, in most cases these phonetic distortions are initiated by either actors or directors without being introduced to the written texts. The degree to which such liberty is possible is largely dependent on the status of the theatre. Traditional theatres tend to adhere to the norms, which are implicitly prescribed by current language ideology of purism. Meanwhile, alternative and fringe theatres are prone to experimenting with the linguistic mode of the play similarly to how they do it with other modes. It is not infrequent that they dare to edit the official translation by introducing some vulgar linguistic elements. For instance, the production of the Ukrainian translation of Tennessee Williams’s play Suddenly Last Summer by Kateryna Mikhalitsyna in Les Kurbas Theatre in Lviv is a representative example of how staging can alter the overall tone of the play. In its written form, the translation has some occasional colloquialisms; otherwise, it is in the standard Ukrainian language. In contrast, the performance abounds in meaningless abusive words, which are the borrowings from the Russian language. These swear words are traditionally believed to be linguistic outcasts as their highest degree of vulgarity provokes an outright rejection of cultured persons. For whatever compelling reason these elements were introduced to the performance, it provides another example of how linguistic hybridity continues to make inroads in the theatrical domain with the lack of awareness on behalf of the agents involved in the process.

On the other occasion, the usage of these Russian swearwords in a text translation compelled a theatre to decide against the translation and to commission a new one. It happened when Voskresinnia Theatre in Lviv was going to stage Harold Pinter’s The Homecoming, in which the East End London sociolect is extensively used. The translation by Markiyan Yakubiak was an attempt to compose a pseudo-dialect whose constituting elements included the standard Ukrainian language, colloquialisms, Russian swear words, Western Ukrainian dialectal words, and the elements of surzhyk. The latter included the Ukrainian words pronounced in the Russian manner, incorrect syntactic constructions, mixed Ukrainian-Russian collocations, and so on. Although from a linguistic point of view this mixture of the standard language, the dialect, and the hybrid language can be classified as a pseudo-dialect, de facto it appeared to be a vulgar cacophonous blending of incompatible lects. To the best of my knowledge, the final convincing argument advanced against the translation was that the abundance of swear words ruins the integrity of the performance and vulgarizes its underlying ideas.

As seen from above, mixing of several idioms is viewed as a possible method of translating dialects in theatre. There have been attempts to apply the method of compilation by introducing lexical or syntactic features of several Western Ukrainian dialects, which are easily recognized due to their considerable dissimilarity with other dialects. The records of performed translated plays show that sometimes the actors do not bother to reproduce the accent peculiar to these dialects. These attempts have been rather inconsistent and sporadic, as dialectal vocabulary has not been densely embedded into the texture. The introduction of dialectal words has been limited to solitary instances, in which they appear to show some extraneous interference rather than to represent speaker’s authenticity.

In the database, there are no plays translated into a Ukrainian parallel dialect. Similarly, localization has never been applied to translating postmodern dramatic texts. Presently, the domestication approach involved in these methods is not widely applicable in theatre translation. Nonetheless, it has not always been the case. In 2o1o, Olha Kobylianska Theatre in Chernivtsi presented a premiere of William Shakespeare’s play The Taming of the Shrew, which used the combination of two Ukrainian translations of the play. The modern version did not exhibit any arresting linguistic features, whereas Yuriy Fedkovych’s translation (1872) relocated the characters to a Ukrainian mountain village and made them speak the Hutsul dialect of the Ukrainian language. The revival of this translation was no more than an audacious experiment, which failed to evoke a wide public response. As things stand today, it does not appear possible to use localization on a wide-scale basis.

6. Concluding remarks

This paper has been written with the hope to encourage the future development of dialect and hybrid language research in theatre translation studies. As the analysis is often confined to cultural and linguistic anomalies in the source text and the methods of their reproduction in translations, I have strived to raise awareness about ideology as a matrix of social practices, which is playing a crucial role in shaping translators’ habitus and is becoming increasingly central in importance for current research in theatre translation studies. Drawing on a wide range of multimodal materials, the analysis has not been confined to the verbal mode of theatre texts. Instead, the availability of recorded performance has lent an additional perspective to the study of dialects and hybrid languages in translation. There is a subset of remarks that arises from the multimodal analysis, which would otherwise escape observation. The degree to which this may matter obviously depends on the strands of opinion underpinning a particular study. Meanwhile, I am inclined to believe that the unimodal analysis of theatre translations may place the research at a grave disadvantage in comparison with the multimodal analysis. 

In the process of research, some generalisations have pushed themselves into prominence. First and foremost, the existing state of affairs in theatre translation precisely synchronizes with the initial expectation that being an integral part of the sociocultural environment, it must be affected by the dominant ideology of linguistic purity. Prevailing textual characteristics of translated texts are ‘indicative of dominant ideology’, but at the same time, the deviations from major patterns are ‘indicative of conflicting and emerging new ideologies’ (Cunico and Munday 2007: 148). On the one hand, standardization in translation is aimed at perpetuating the high status of the Ukrainian language; on the other hand, there have been attempts to broaden the translation norms by alleviating the postcolonial anxiety in relation to language through the introduction of unwanted linguistic elements, such as hybrid language units, to the translations of postmodern drama. Seemingly, professional translators are more prone to follow the established norms and to sustain language purity, while amateur translators are more vigorous in violating the norms and reversing dominant ideological patterns.

References

Annamalai, Elayaperumal (1989) “The linguistic and social dimensions of purism” in The politics of language purism, Bjorn Jernudd and Michael J. Shapiro (eds), Berlin and New York: Mounton de Gruvter: 225-231.

Ashcroft, Bill, Gareth Griffiths, and Helen Tiffin (eds) (2006) The post-colonial studies reader, Taylor & Francis.

Auer, Peter (1999) “From codeswitching via language mixing to fused lects: Toward a dynamic typology of bilingual speech”, The International Journal of Bilingualism, no. 3(4): 309-332.

Bakhtin, Mikhail (1981) The dialogic imagination, trans. Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist, Austin: University of Texas Press.

Bandia, Paul (1996) “Code-Switching and Code-Mixing in African Creative Writing: Some Insights for Translation Studies”, TTR, no. 9(1): 139–153.

Bernsand, Niklas (2001) “Surzhyk and national identity in Ukrainian nationalist language ideology”, Berliner Osteuropa Info, no. 17: 38-47.

Bhabha, Homi (1990) “The third space: Interview with Homi Bhabha” in Identity, community, and difference, J. Rutherford (ed.): 207-221.

Bhabha, Homi (1994) The Location of Culture, New York: Routledge.

Bilaniuk, Laada (1997) “Speaking of ‘Surzhyk’: Ideologies and Mixed Languages”, Harvard Ukrainian Studies, no. 21 (1/2): 93-117.

Bilaniuk, Laada (2004) “A typology of surzhyk: Mixed Ukrainian-Russian language”, International Journal of Bilingualism, no. 8 (4): 409-425.

Calzada-Pérez, Maria (2014) Apropos of ideology: translation studies on ideology-ideologies in translation studies, Routledge.

Collins, Georgina (2010) “The translator as mediator: interpreting ‘non-standard’ French in Senegalese women’s literature”, Peer English: 98-113.

Comrie, Bernard (1992) “Slavic Languages” in International Encyclopaedia of Linguistics, Vol. 3, Oxford: 452–456.

Consiglio, Maria Cristina (2oo8) “Montalbano Here”: Problems in Translating Multilingual Novels”, Thinking Translation: Perspectives from Within and Without: 47-68.

Cunico, Sonia and Jeremy Munday (2007) “Encounters and Clashes: Introduction to Translation and Ideology” in Sonia Cunico and Jeremy Munday (eds) Translation and Ideology: Encounters and Clashes. Special issue of The Translator, no. 13 (2): 141-150.

Erkazanci, Hilal (2009) “Language planning in Turkey: A source of censorship on translations” in Translation and censorship in different times and landscapes, Seruya Teresa and Maria Lin Moniz (eds), Cambridge Scholars Publishing: 241-251.

Fairclough, Norman (2010) Critical discourse analysis: The critical study of language, Harlow: Longman.

Flier, Michael (2000) “Surzhyk: pravyla utvorennia bezladu”, Krytyka: 16-17.

Flier, Michael (2008) “Surzhyk or Surzhyks?” in Belarusian trasjanka and ukrainian surzhyk: Structural and social aspects of their description and categorization, Gerd Hentschel and Siarhiej Zaprudski (eds), Oldenburg: BIS-Verlag der Carl von Ossietzky Universitaet Oldenburg: 39-56.

Fuderer, Tetiana (2011) “Movna sytuatsiya v Ukrayini v katehoriyakh kontseptsiyi Kloda Azhezha”, Mova i suspilstvo, no. 2, Lviv: 62-71.

Geertz, Clifford (1973) The interpretation of cultures, Basic books.

Halas, Anna (2010) “Sotsialna zumovlenist rozvytku perekladatskyh stratehiy”, Mova i suspilstvo, no. 1, Lviv: 189–198.

Halas, Anna (2015) “Hibrydna identychnist u khudozhniomu dyskursi: trudnoshchi perekladu”, Mova i suspilstvo, no. 6, Lviv: 77-88

Hojan, Yarema (1991) “Vstup” in Pro ridnu movy i ukrayinsku shkolu, Mykhailo Hrushevskyi, Kyiv: Veselka.

Hoogvelt, Ankie (1997) Globalisation and the postcolonial world: The new political economy of development, London: Macmillan.

Huddart, David. (2005) Homi K. Bhabha, Psychology Press.

Hull, Geoffrey and Halyna Koscharsky (2006) “Contours and Consequences of the Lexical Divide in Ukrainian”, ASEES, no. 20 (1-2): 139-172.

Jost, John (2006) “The end of the end of ideology”, American Psychologist, no. 61: 651-670.

Kent, Kateryna (2010) “Language contact: Morphosyntactic analysis of Surzhyk spoken in Central Ukraine”, LSO Working Papers in Linguistics, no. 8: 33-53.

Klinger, Susanne (2014) Translation and Linguistic Hybridity: Constructing World-View, Routledge.

Kress, Gunther (2010) Multimodality. A social semiotic approach to communication, London: Routledge.

Luke, Alan (2001) “Ideology” in Concise Encyclopaedia of Sociolinguistics, Rajend Mesthrie (ed.), Elsevier: 559-563.

Martin, John Levi (2015) “What is ideology?”, Sociologia, Problemas E Práticas, no. 77: 9-31.

Masenko, Larysa (2004) Mova i suspilstvo. Postkolonialnyi vymir. Kyiv: Academia.

Masenko, Larysa (2008) “Surzhyk: Istoriia formuvannia, suchasny˘i stan, perspektyvy funktsionuvannia” in Belarusian trasjanka and ukrainian surzhyk: Structural and social aspects of their description and categorization, Gerd Hentschel and Siarhiej Zaprudski (eds), Oldenburg: BIS-Verlag der Carl von Ossietzky Universitaet Oldenburg: 39-56.

Meakins, Felicity (2013) “Mixed languages” in Contact Languages: A Comprehensive Guide, Bakker, P. and Yaron M. (eds), Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter: 159-228.

Mesthrie, Rajend, Joan Swann, Andrea Deumert and William L. Leap (2009) Introducing sociolinguistics. Edinburgh University Press, 2009.

Munday, Jeremy (2013) Style and ideology in translation: Latin American writing in English, Routledge.

Myers-Scotton, Carol (2002) Contact linguistics: Bilingual encounters and grammatical outcomes, New York: Oxford University Press.

Myers-Scotton, Carol (2006) Multiple voices: An introduction to bilingualism, Malden: Blackwell Publishing.

Panko, Tamila (1991) Mova i kultura nacii, Lviv: 3-7.

Perteghella, Manuela (2002) “Language and Politics on Stage: Strategies for Translating Dialect and Slang with References to Shaw’s Pygmalion and Bond’s Saved”, Translation Review, no. 64: 45-53.

Rojo López, Ana Maria and Marina Ramos Caro (2014) “The impact of translators’ ideology on the translation process: a reaction time experiment”, MonTI Special Issue – Minding Translation: 247-271.

Romaine, Suzanne (2001) “Dialect and Dialectology” in Rajend Mesthrie (ed.), Elsevier: 310-318.

Ryabchuk, Mykola (2010) “The Ukrainian ‘Friday’ and the Russian ‘Robinson’: The Uneasy Advent of Postcoloniality”, Canadian–American Slavic Studies 44: 7–24.

Serbenska, Oleksandra (1994) Antysurzhyk. Lviv: Svit.

Spolsky, Bernard (2004) Language policy, Cambridge University Press.

Stavytska, Lesya (2005).  Argo, jargon, slang: sotsialna differentsiatsiya ukrayinskoyi movy. Kyiv: Krytyka.

Stavytska, Lesya and Volodymyr Trub (2007): “Surzhyk: sumish, mova, komunikatsiya” in Ukrainsko-rosiyska dvomovnist. Linhvosotsiokultuni aspekty, Kyiv: 31-120.

Swann, Joan, Andrea Deumert, Theresa Lillis, and Rajend Mesthrie (2004). A dictionary of sociolinguistics, Edinburgh University Press.

Tedin, Kent L. (1987) “Political ideology and the vote”, Research in Micro-Politics, no. 2: 63-94.

Tymoczko, Maria (2003) “Translation, ideology, and creativity”, Linguistica Antverpiensia, New Series–Themes in Translation Studies, no. 2: 27-45.

van Dijk, Teun (1998) Ideology: multidisciplinary approach, SAGE.

van Leeuwen, Theo (2013) “Critical analysis of multimodal discourse” in Encyclopaedia of applied linguistics, C. Chapelle (ed.), Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell: 1-5.

Venuti, Lawrence (ed.) (1992) Rethinking translation: Discourse, subjectivity, ideology. Taylor & Francis.

Wodak, Ruth and Michael Meyer (eds) (2009) Method of Critical Discourse Analysis, Sage Publication Ltd.

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"Ideological dimensions of linguistic hybridity in Ukrainian theatre translation"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2460

The orality features of Parlache in the novel Rosario Tijeras, by Jorge Franco, and their German and English translations

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Abstract & Keywords

The translation of a linguistic variety (dialect) poses an additional challenge to the translator due to the social, historical, and cultural aspects of a specific community. The present paper aims to analyse how orality is evoked, through linguistic variation, in the novel Rosario Tijeras, by Colombian writer Jorge Franco. It also seeks to establish the (in)equivalence degree of orality features of a social dialect called Parlache (source text, ST) and its translations into English and German (target texts, TT). In this thriller —belonging to the subgenre of narconovela—, Franco uses Parlache, which has originated in a deprived socio-economic area of Medellín, Colombia, and subsequently spread across the city and the whole country. Typical features of Parlache include: voseo, phraseological units and specific vocabulary relating mainly to violence, drugs, and narcotraffic, but also to love, death, life, and friendship.

Keywords: Parlache, diatopic variety, diastratic variety, dialect, narconovela, inequivalence

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"The orality features of Parlache in the novel Rosario Tijeras, by Jorge Franco, and their German and English translations"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2468

Introduction

This article aims to analyse how orality is evoked, through linguistic variation, in the novel Rosario Tijeras, by Colombian writer Jorge Franco, and to establish the (in)equivalence degree of orality features of the Parlache, between the source text (ST) and its translations into English and German (target texts, TT), from translation procedures. The main contribution of my investigation will be the translation of fictive orality through linguistic variation (diatopic/diastratic/even diaphasic variety of Colombian Spanish) into German and English. Typical features of Parlache include: voseo, phraseological units and specific vocabulary relating mainly to violence, drugs, and narcotraffic, but also to love, death, life, and friendship.

On the one hand, the main goal of this article is to research the function of linguistic variation in depicting communicative immediacy —specifically, in the field of literary fictional orality. On the other hand, I intend to study the issues a translator confronts when transferring those elements of linguistic variation (Parlache) from source text to target text.

Thus, this paper aims to establish how these typical phraseological units of this variety of Spanish contribute to the construction of a believable spoken dialogue. Therefore, I will not only study translation divergences but also the description of linguistic variation (diatopic and diastratic) through phraseological units.

The novel (source text)

Rosario Tijeras is a thriller and belongs to the subgenre of the narconovela because it deals with drug (narco)-trafficking and takes place during the 1980s, an era of horrible violence in Medellín, Colombia. Some people also classify it as a novela negra (crime novel). Although the novel swings between violence and death, the Leitmotiv is love. Rosario Tijeras depicts a love triangle between two young rich men —Emilio and Antonio— and Rosario, a hit woman. Besides these three main characters, there are some secondary ones including: Ferney (Rosario’s ex-boyfriend), Johnefe (Rosario’s brother), Doña Rubi (Rosario’s mother), and Daisy (Rosario’s friend). These characters help to build up a picture of two different sides of Medellín — one belonging to the rich, middle-class “good guys” and the other belonging to deprived, struggling-for-survival “bad guys”. The story tells how these two worlds intertwined during the blood years of drug trafficking in the 1980s and is expressed in fast, vibrant prose, with poetic flare, alternating between standard Spanish, Colombian Spanish, Spanish from Medellín, and Parlache. The author, Jorge Fanco, was born in Medellín, Colombia, in 1962. He studied filmmaking at the London International Film School and Literature at the Pontificia Universidad Javeriana in Bogotá. He has already earned a prominent place alongside several world-renowned Colombian writers. Paraíso Travel and Rosario Tijeras have been adapted into films. In 2014, he was awarded the Premio Alfaguara.

Parlache

If one considers Colombian Spanish to be a diasystem, then Parlache is a diatopic, diastratic variety, belonging to the communicative language of immediacy coined by Koch & Oesterreicher (1990, 2001). It demonstrates specific social characteristics, having originated in socio-economically deprived areas of Medellín. Castañeda and Henao (1999: xvii) define Parlache as “a social dialect originated and developed in a deprived socio-economic area of Medellín, and the metropolitan area of the Aburrá Valley.”

At first, it was considered to be an ephemeral, linguistic phenomenon but Parlache has now spread, not only across the departmento[1] of Antioquia, but all across Colombia. Although the Diccionario de la Lengua Española (DRAE, 2001, p. 1683) defines Parlache as “jerga surgida y desarrollada en los sectores populares y marginados de Medellín, que se ha extendido a otros estratos sociales del país”[2], Castañeda (2005) states that Parlache is a wide-diffusion linguistic variety with characteristics of a jargon emerging in some deprived socio-economic strata but later spreading in other socio-economic strata across the whole country. In addition, Parlache has influenced radio, television, theater, cinema, and literature (Vila and Castañeda, 2006).

Parlache is clearly a Spanish variety because its word creation and word changing belong to the morphological, syntactic, phonological, and semantic processes of Spanish. It has incorporated words from colloquial Caribbean languages, the Lunfardo, the rural language of Antioquia, the colloquial language of Colombia, and Spanish jargon from Spain. Parlache also include some borrowings from English and, to a lesser extent, from Portuguese. The orality features of Parlache in Rosario Tijeras are shown through: 1) the use of specific vocabulary and vocatives such as parcero (‘buddy’), güevón (‘moron’, ‘buddy’), marica (‘queer’, ‘buddy’); 2) idioms, i.e. phrases and routine formulae; and 3) pronouns, namely the predominant use of vos (informal pronoun of second person, singular, commonly used in two-thirds of Latin America) instead of (informal pronoun of second person, singular) and, to a lesser extent, usted (formal pronoun of second person plural). This use of pronouns is common to all Spanish spoken in Medellín and Antioquia.

Word formation. In Parlache, word formation works in the same way as in Spanish. The often-colorful vocabulary is the result of:

  • Derivation: e.g. soplar (‘to inhale cocaine’) → soplada soplador, soplete; basuco/bazuco (‘paste of coke mixed with other stuff’) → basuquero
  • Compounding: e.g. parceriwafer (parcero + wafer ‘buddy); narcopara (narcotraficante ‘drug trafficker’ + paramilitar); bombondrilo (bombón + cocodrilo ‘woman with hot body but very ugly face’); inteliburro (‘moron’); lambeculo (lambón + culo ‘like teacher’s pet but also snitch’)
  • Clipping: e.g. parceroparce; paramilitarpara; prostitutaprosti = ‘prostitute’
  • Acronyms: e.g. bacrim (‘criminal gangs’); amigovio (amigo + novio ‘friend with benefits’); Metrallín (Medellín + metralla ‘submachine gun’); mafioneta (‘truck used by drug dealers or by hitmen’); gonorzobia (an insult)
  • New semantic meanings (resemantización): e.g. joyita (an insult meaning ‘dangerous’); carátula →cara (‘face’)
  • Revitalization: e.g. fariseo → ‘traitor’; lacra → ‘scumbag’; muñeco → ‘dead person’
  • Syllabic inversion (vesre): e.g. trocencentro (‘downtown’); misacacamisa (‘shirt’); tolis listo (‘ready’)
  • Onomatopoeia: e.g. tilín (‘bell sound’) (from tilíntilín derives the noun phrase mucho tilín tilíny nada de paletas): ‘someone who promises a lot but never keep his/her promises’

According to Rojo’s (2009) classification, the phraseological units of Parlache are idioms and phrases. Examples of Parlache idioms, specifically routine formulae, include ¡Qué bacanería! ‘so cool!’; todo rai ‘everything is cool’; nos vemos las carátulas ‘see you later, alligator’. The phrases are predominantly verbal (e.g. colgar los guayos ‘to die’) but also include noun phrases (asesino de la moto ‘hitman’) and, to a lesser extent, adverbial phrases (a lo sano ‘following instructions by the book’) and adjective phrases (mera mamacita ‘such a hottie’). These phrases are stable word-groups but can be creatively modified. For example, the phraseological unit abrirse del parche (‘to disappear’) can be transformed into the hybrid expression ‘open the parch’.

Theoretical framework

The term phraseological unit (PU) has been defined precisely in some German and Spanish linguistic traditions (Gläser, 1986 and Corpas Pastor, 2003) and “comprises several types of fixed phrases, such as ‘collocations’, ‘idioms’, ‘proverbs’, ‘formulaic expressions’ and ‘clichés’. All these categories are structured around a prototype that can be defined according to two essential features: the fixed and idiomatic nature of a typical phraseological unit” (Rojo 2009:133). Phraseological units have a particular communicative efficiency since they belong to the linguistic domain of a specific community. Their interpretation depends on a codified background belonging to the speakers of a linguistic community who share beliefs, ideas, and knowledge. In addition, phraseological units vary even within the same language because they are associated with the geographical location, communicative situation, and socio-cultural level of their speakers. Zuluaga (2002: 68) suggests that phraseological units can depict not only the history related to a specific community but also how the members of this group see the world.

Semantic and pragmatic aspects of phraseological units

Generally speaking, all phraseological units show a certain degree of translation. Their interpretation depends on inference operations because their meaning is not the sum of every individual components but the representations of legitimate beliefs and values of a specific community. Therefore, the most relevant aspect of using phraseological units is their pragmatic component. A phraseological unit can provide information about the physical and temporal context of their components, as well as the social level of the speakers using it, or the type of speech acts they represent. Corpas (1996: 88) defines phrases (locuciones in Spanish) as “unidades fraseológicas del sistema de la lengua que tienen fijación interna y unidad de significado, que no constituyen enunciados completos y que, generalmente, funcionan como elementos oracionales.”[3]

The process of translating phraseological units is not easy because a translator must take into consideration the whole system of values and beliefs attached to the source text (ST) rather than simply looking for equivalences. For Zuluaga (1998: 207) equivalence in translation is a relative concept: it is not a matter of total equivalences but of partial equivalences. This means that the translation of phraseological units is not a relation of fidelity/ faithfulness (Baker, 2004) per se but an invariable value that stays constant, unchanging; that is, becomes an ‘invariant’. This ‘invariant’ could be: the connotation, which will be determined by some symbolic value of the source culture (SC) or target culture (TC); the denotation; the register; the components; the fixation in sociolinguistic norms; or the formal structure. During the translation process a translator must choose which element should stay invariant in order to achieve the closest natural equivalent to the source text. Therefore, equivalence is closely linked to the greater or lesser grade of invariance associated with semantic level (denotation, connotation), morphosyntactic level (formal structure and components), and pragmatics (linguistic fixation and style). In other words, equivalence need not be considered in terms of ‘how close’ a target text is to the same reality portrayed in the source text. Rather, equivalence refers to how close a translation comes to reproducing the same effect or response in the readers of the target text as the effect produced in readers of the source text.

According to Wotjak (1995), communicative equivalence is a very important feature related to fidelity and invariance. Furthermore, a total congruency between loyalty (Loyalität) and Skopos is only possible when the latter does not show a change in the communicative function of the original text. Before stating how phraseology relates to fictional orality, I will define the latter according to Brumme and Espunya (2012: 13) as:

[A]ny attempt to recreate the language of communicative immediacy in fictional texts, including both narrative and theatrical texts as well as audiovisual or multimodal texts. Fictional orality is not opposed to actual orality but is conceived as a special technique which consists mainly of the evocation of certain characteristics of spoken communicative situations such as spontaneity, familiarity, face-to-face interaction or physical proximity.”

According to Burger (1979) and Stein (2007) there are two types of phraseological units related to communicative immediacy. The first type are referential phraseological units, which refer to objects, processes, or situations belonging either to reality or fiction. They increase the expressiveness of the story since they reflect the emotional attitudes of the speakers, the register, the social value of the phraseological unit, and a specific diatopic/diastratic/diaphasic variation. The second type of phraseological units are communicative ones, such as some fixed forms, collocations, or idioms linked to a particular pragmatic function, for example, greetings. Both types of phraseological units seek to recreate spontaneous conversation between characters and attempt to be closer to oral speech; they belong to the ‘language of communicative immediacy’ (Sprache der Nähe) (Oesterreicher 1997; Koch and Oesterreicher 1990; 2011). Likewise, phraseological units with a diasystem mark have an evocative function within fictional orality, for example, those belonging to a diatopic/diastratic variety. Since phraseological units recreate daily conversations, they become an important linguistic source in the speech of characters. Phraseological units can therefore evoke an authentic, idiomatic, or even stereotyped speech depicting the thoughts and attitudes of speakers.

Data Analysis

Literary texts are often linked to culture and literary traditions belonging to source language (Hurtado, 2001). In the novel Rosario Tijeras, for example, all the dialogues are spoken in Parlache, which reinforces orality features in terms of spontaneous dialogues, as well as familiarity, face-to-face interaction, and physical proximity between characters. Furthermore, orality features of Parlache are shown through its colourful vocabulary and phrases, both embedded in a cultural context that is also related to social, political, economic, and geographical features.

Regarding the English and German translations, it is worth remembering that translators translate texts as a whole and not just as words. However, since one of the main goals of this contribution is to find out how features of Parlache were translated into English and German, it makes sense to divide this analysis in two parts: the translation of vocabulary and the translation of phraseological units. The translation of vocabulary is based on translation techniques proposed by Molina & Hurtado Albir (2002: 498-512). In addition, I have identified one unsuitable interpretation, five omissions and one case of ambiguity. According to their classification, the following techniques were found in the translation of Parlache vocabulary in the novel Rosario Tijeras:

  1. Borrowing: this technique consists of taking a word or expression from another language. All borrowings found in this study were pure borrowings. There are three examples: the German translations of oficina (written by Franco as La Oficina and meaning ‘the place where illicit operations are scheduled’), patrón (‘capo’) and bazuco (‘cocaine mixed with other substances’). Although German readers can probably get the meaning of these words through context, there could also be confusion and an important loss in connotation.
  2. Calque: literal translation of a foreign word or phrase. There are two cases of calques in this study: the German translation of acostar (‘to kill someone’) as schlafen legen and the English translation of patrón (‘capo’) as boss.
  3. Established equivalent: using a term or expression recognized (by language in use or dictionaries) as an equivalent in the target language. Some of the examples of this technique are: the German and English translations of bajar (‘to kill’) as abknallen and to kill, respectively; the English and German translations of viejo (‘friend’ and vocative) as man and Alter, respectively.
  4. Generalization: using a more general or neutral term. Two examples of this are the English translation of bazuco as coke and the German translation of plástica (‘a woman who only worries about her looks’) as Tussi.
  5. Linguistic amplification: adding linguistic elements to the target text. One example of this technique is the English and German translations of duro (‘capo’) as tough guy and knallharter Typ.
  6. Reduction: suppressing an information item from the source text in the target text. There are two examples of this technique: the German translation of tumbar (‘to kill someone’) as vorknöpfen and the German translation of encarretado (‘being in love or having a lot of enthusiasm in doing something’) as haufenweise.
  7. Discursive creation: establishing a temporary equivalence that it is totally unpredictable out of context. There are two examples of this technique: the German translation of duro (los duros) as die Oberharten and the German translation of bajar as abknallen.
  8. Transposition: changing a grammatical category. One example of this technique is the German translation of güevón (noun, meaning ‘moron’, used also as vocative) as spinnen (verb).
  9. Unsuitable interpretation: only one example of an unsuitable interpretation is identified, the German translation of solle (‘high’) as starker Typ.
  10. Omission: there were five omissions. The word parcerito (‘friend’) appears several times in the novel and was omitted once in the English translation. Other omission occurred in the German translation with one of the 73 occurrences of word parcero (‘friend’) and one omission of the occurrences of word viejo. The last two omissions occurred in the English translations of the word loco.
  11. Ambiguity: this case of ambiguity occurred with the English and German translations of arrecha (meaning ‘horny’ in Parlache) as sexy and geil, respectively. Although the meaning of arrecha in Parlache, Medellín and Antioquia is only ‘sexually aroused’, the fragment of the source text in which the word appears could be understood as expressing ‘very attractive, astonishing’. Sexy and geil both mean ‘sexually aroused’ and ‘attractive, astonishing’; therefore, it is impossible to assert if the translators understood the meaning of the word as stated in Parlache, or if they understood the other meaning, or if they understood there to be an ambiguity given the context.

Regarding the translation of phraseological units, it is worth mentioning the phraseological units belonging to a particular dialect, linguistic variety, or diasystem — in this particular case, Parlache — are evocative elements of fictional orality, since they reflect specific cultural and geographical features. Freunek (2007: 56-57) states that idiomatic, typical, stereotypical language is one of the most important evocations of communicative immediacy in literary texts. According to Freunek (2007), the orality evoked by phraseological units can be invariant depending on specificities of any language and culture.

The following contrastive analysis of the translation of typical phraseological units from Parlache is based on the concepts of equivalence as defined by Zuluaga (1998: 212); Baker (1992: 71-78); López (2002: 102-106); Wotjak (1987: 92; 1992: 42-43); and Zurdo (1999: 360-363).

The analysis is also based on three types of invariants affecting the semantic, pragmatic value of phraseological units: denotation, connotation, and register.

As a result, seven procedures were found for the translation of phraseological units:

  1. Calque: through this procedure the translator reproduces the semantic phraseological scheme of the original phraseological unit; i.e., the phraseological unit of the source language. This technique is meant to recover expressive, figurative features of the original phraseological unit. Nevertheless, using this technique can cause a significant loss in connotation or even generate difficulties for the reader of the source text. Some examples of calques are: PU fumársela verde, with the English translation smoke it green; and oler a formol, with the German translation nach formalin riechen and the English translation stinking of formaldehyde. In all cases, denotation is invariant but not necessarily the connotation.
  2. Partial correspondence of components and similar content: in this procedure both phraseological units (the one from the source language and the one from the target language) have the same connotation and functional, pragmatic equivalence but only a partial denotation, due to their different lexical composition. Some examples of this procedure are: PU billete grande, with the German translation schönes Sümmchen and the English translation big money; PU los buenos del paseo, with the German translation wohlhabende Leute—the register is invariant in both cases—; PU dar candela, with the German translation heißes Gefecht—the connotation is invariant, but the register is not; and PU probar finura, with the German translation Geschicklichkeit beweisen.
  3. Correspondence in content but not in components: in this procedure both phraseological units (in source language and target language) slightly differ in their figurative base —and therefore in the literal meaning of their lexical composition — but have the same conceptual, denotative meaning; i.e. they evoke the same reality with a different lexicalization. Besides, the equivalent units of the target text belong to the same level of language as those of the source text. Some examples of this procedure are: PU cargar tierra con el pecho, with the German translation das Gras von unten wachsen sehen and the English translation worm food; PU chupar gladiolo, with the German translation Gänseblümchen von unten wachsen sehen and the English translation to push up daisies; and PU comer cuento (with the German translation kann man kein X für ein U vormachen). In all these examples the connotation is invariant, but the register is higher than in the original PU.
  4. Partial correspondence regarding the semantic-pragmatic value: In this procedure, the lack of equivalence and correspondence of most units of the target language is due to differences in register. Since the source text contains a lot of colloquial and dialectal language, most cases differ in the colloquial register; for example, vulgar/colloquial register in the source text vs. standard register in the target text. Therefore, there is a significant loss in the sociolinguistic information expressed through the source text. Examples of this procedures are: PU cagarse de la risa, with the English translation dying with laughter; PU parar bolas, with the English translation to pay attention.
  5. Linguistic compression: in this procedure, the denotative meaning of the phraseological unit of the source language is translated into a lexeme or binomial in the target language. Examples of this procedure are: PU los duros de los duros, with the German translation die Oberharten; and PU meter perico, with the German translation Koks reinziehen and the English translation doing coke — the register and connotation are invariant in these two examples.
  6. Paraphrase (when the phraseological unit in the source language has no phraseological unit in target language): in this procedure, the denotative meaning of the phraseological unit of the source language is translated into three or more words but not a PU in the target language. Some examples of this procedure are: PU llegar el fax and its English translation to hear about that (the register does not stay invariant); PU dedicarse (alguien) al rebusque with the English translation to devote (someone) to scavenging; PU probar finura and its English translation to prove their skills.
  7. Unsuitable interpretation of the PU: there was an unsuitable interpretation regarding the English translation of PU no comer cuento as not to take crap. The meaning of no comer cuento in Parlache is ‘not to let anyone fool you’; different from not to take crap which, according to the Macmillan Dictionary, is: ‘phrase, impolite, to not let someone behave in an unpleasant or unfair way to you’.
  8. Omission: This procedure occurs either when the translation of the phraseological unit of source text poses great difficulty or the translator considers its translation irrelevant to understanding the target text, thus causing a semantic or pragmatic loss. There was only one example of omission and it occurred in the English translation of the PU los buenos del paseo. In this case, it is possible the translator noticed or assumed a certain redundancy in the source text regarding the phrases la gente bien (meaning ‘people of a high economic status’, according to DRAE) and los buenos del paseo (meaning ‘nice people’); therefore, there is a pragmatic loss since the meanings of the phrases are not necessarily the same. As a result, the translator unified both expressions with the standard phrase proper upright people, without noticing that the source text expressions belong to different registers.

The following tables summarize some examples of vocabulary and phraseological units of Parlache and their translations:

Table 1

Table 2

Table 3

Table 4

Other issues have been explored but not mentioned in the analysis above due to space limitations. In the cases of calques, for example, although the metaphors of vocabulary and PU remained in their German and English translations, it is very likely that target-culture readers do not get the real communicative function of the source text. Although source language-speaker readers can understand that there is a metaphor involved in what they are reading, the image evoked for them is not necessarily the same as the image evoked for Parlache-native speakers or even Colombian readers who are able to draw on their understanding of Colombia in the 1980s. As for the other procedures, even though they are completely different their outcome is very similar. In those other cases, when translators were confronted with markers of Parlache, they did not render the source text variety but the variation itself, the semantic alteration, the register, and the relative deviation of the norm.

As demonstrated by the analysis above, when translating vocabulary and phraseological units belonging to a diatopic/diastratic variation many contextual elements related to idiosyncrasy, culture, and social reality of the source text are lost. This happens because those elements (especially, phraseological units) are language unities depicting cultural, pragmatic, historic, linguistic, and social features of a particular community and therefore their translation can be a very difficult task.

As stated previously, for this study I have established the degree of equivalence of the translation based on the elements that remained invariant. However, in the translations of vocabulary and phraseological units of the corpus there are some stylistic criteria that necessarily entail a loss. For that reason, it is advisable that a translator choose which element should stay invariant in order to achieve the closest natural equivalent of the source text. Therefore, translating phraseological units and vocabulary belonging to a linguistic variety is not just rendering into a target text the same reality portrayed in the source text but rather reproducing in the readers of target text the same response or effect produced in the readers of the source text.

Conclusions

Literary texts are often linked to culture and literary traditions belonging to a source language which, at the same time, is embedded in a cultural context related to social, political, economic, and geographical features. Therefore, the translation of a linguistic variety (dialect) poses an additional challenge to the translator due to the social, historical, and cultural aspects of that specific community related to such source language. And, as a consequence, when translating oral features belonging to a diatopic/diastratic variety many elements related to its culture, idiosyncrasy and reality are lost.

Regarding the English and German translations of the novel Rosario Tijeras, the translation of vocabulary and phraseological units of Parlache has entailed some loss. In respect of vocabulary, for instance, the greater loss occurred in borrowings (three cases), calques (two cases), omissions (five cases), and unsuitable interpretations (one case). As for the phraseological units, the greater loss occurred in calques (four cases), omission (one case), and unsuitable interpretations (two cases). As a result, the total number of cases with a greater loss in the translations was 18, which is a 2.95% of the whole corpus. Despite this, the target texts kept the communicative function of the source text because translators tried to preserve as much invariants as they could in order to achieve the closest natural equivalent to the source text. In other cases, when translators could not keep any invariant at all, they did not render the source text variety but the variation itself, the semantic alteration, the register, and the relative deviation of the norm.

It is worth mentioning that in the translation of vocabulary and phraseological units of the corpus of this study there are some stylistic criteria that necessarily entail a loss. Since the concept of equivalence is linked to the degree of invariance associated with semantic, morphosyntactic, and pragmatic levels, it is advisable that a translator choose which element should stay invariant in order to achieve the closest natural equivalent of the source text. In conclusion, translating words and phraseological units belonging to a diatopic/diastratic variety is not just rendering into a target text the same reality portrayed in the source text but rather reproducing in the readers of target text the same effect or response produced in the readers of the source text.

Lastly, it is important to add that although none of the vocabulary and phraseological units of Parlache has an equivalent vocabulary or phraseological unit in German and English, the translators did the best they could to interpret those features of the source text and to reproduce —at least in most of the cases— the same communicative function of the source text.

References

Albrecht, Jörn (2005) Übersetzung und Linguistik, Tübingen, Narr

Baker, Mona (1992) In Other Words: A Coursebook on Translation, London, Routledge

Baker, Mona (2004) “The Status of Equivalence in Translation Studies: An Appraisal” in A New Spectrum of Translation Studies, J M Bravo (ed), Valladolid, Universidad de  Valladolid: 63-71.

Balzer, Berit et al. (2010) Kein Blatt vor den Mund nehmen. No tener pelos en la lengua. Diccionario fraseológico alemán-español. Phraseologisches Wörterbuch Deustch- Spanisch, Madrid, Editorial Idiomas  

Brumme, Jenny, and Espunya, Anna (eds) (2012) The Translation of Fictive Dialogue. Amsterdam/ New York, Rodopi.

Burger, Harald (1979) “Phraseologie und gesprochene Sprache” in Standard und Dialekt.  Studien zur gesprochenen und geschrieben Gegen-Wartssprache. Festschrift für Heinz Rupp zum 60. Geburtstag, H Löffler, K Pestalozzi, and M Stern (eds), Bern, Munich,  Fran>Burger, H. (2005). 30 Jahre germanistische Phraseologieforschung. Hermes, Journal of Linguistics, 35, 18-43.

Cadera, Susanne (2002) Dargestellte Mündlichkeit in Romanen von Mario Vargas Llosa, Ginebra, Librairie Droz.

---- (2012) “Translating fictive dialogue in novels” in The Translation of Fictive Dialogue,  Jenny Brumme and Anna Espunya (eds), Amsterdam/New York, Rodopi: 35-51.

Castañeda, Luz Stella, and José Ignacio Henao (2015) Diccionario de uso de parlache. Versión revisada y actualizada, Frankfurt am Main, Peter Lang.

Castañeda, L.S. (2005). El parlache: resultados de una investigación lexicográfica. Forma y Función 18, 74-100.

Castañeda, Luz Stella, and José Ignacio Henao (2002) “Parlache. El lenguaje de los jóvenes marginales de Medellín” in Movimientos juveniles en América Latina: pachuchos, malandros, punketas, Carles Feixa et alii. (eds.), Barcelona, Ariel: 79-94.

Castañeda, Luz Stella (2003). La formación de palabras en el parlache. Actas del XXIII Congreso Internacional de Lingüística y Filología Románica, Vol. III. (pp. 61-68). Tübingen: Max Niemeyer.

Castañeda, Luz Stella, and José Ignacio Henao (2001) El parlache, Medellín, Universidad de Antioquia.

Castañeda, Luz Stella, and José Ignacio Henao (2006) Diccionario del parlache, Medellín, La Carreta Editores.

Corpas, Gloria (1996) Manual de fraseología española, Madrid, Gredos

Corpas, Gloria (2000) “Acerca de la (in)traducibilidad de la fraseología” in Las lenguas de Europa: estudios de fraseología, fraseografía y traducción, Gloria Corpas (ed), Granada, Comares: 483-522.

Corpas, Gloria (2000) “Fraseología y traducción” in El discurs prefabricat. Estudis de fraseología teòrica i aplicada, Vincent Salvador and Adolf Piquer (eds), Castelló, Publicaciones de la Universitat Jaume I: 107-138.

Corpas, Gloria (2001) “La traducción de las unidades fraseológicas” in La lingüística aplicada a finales del siglo XX: ensayos y propuestas, Isabel de la Cruz Cabanillas, Carmen Santamaría García, Cristina Tejedor Martínez, and Carmen Valero Garcés (eds), Alcalá, Asociación Española de Lingüística Aplicada: 779-786.

Corpas, Gloria (2003) Diez años de investigación en fraseología: análisis sintáctivo-semánticos, contrastivos y traductológicos, Madrid, Frankfurt, Iberoamericana.

Duden. Redewendungen ( 11th ed.) (2013), Berlin, Dudenverlag.

García-Page, Mario (2008) Introducción a la fraseología española. Estudio de las locuciones,  Barcelona, Anthropos

Gläser, Rosemarie (1986) Phraseologie der Englische Sprache, Leipzig, VEB Verlag Enzyklopädie.

Freunek, Sigrid (2007) Literarische Mündlichkeit und Übersetzung, Berlín, Frank & Timme

Hurtado, Amparo (2001) Traducción y traductología. Introducción a la traductología, Madrid, Cátedra

Hurtado, Amparo and Molina, Lucía (2000) “Translation techniques revisited: A dynamic and functional approach”, META, Journal de Traducteurs 47, no. 4: 498-512.

Koch, Peter, and Wulf Oesterreicher (2011) Gesprochene Sprache in der Romania. Französisch, Italienisch, spanisch, Berlin/New York, Walter de Gruyter.

López, Cecilia (2002). Aspectos de fraseología contrastiva (alemán-español) en el sistema y en el texto, Frankfurt am Main, Peter Lang.

Macmillan Dictionary (2009) Macmillan Dictionary, Macmillan Publishers Limited. URL: http://www.macmillandictionary.com/ (accessed 17 October  2017)

Oesterreicher, Wulf (1997) “Types of Orality in Text” in Written Voices Spoken Signs. Tradition, Performance and the Epic Text, Egbert J. Bakker and Ahuvia Kahane (eds.), Cambridge/London, Harvard University Press: 190-214.

Pym, Anthony (2000) “Translating Linguistic Variation: Parody and the Creation of Authenticity” in Traducción, metrópoli y diáspora, Miguel Ángel Vega and Rafael Martín-Gaitero (eds), Madrid, Universidad Complutense de Madrid: 69-75.

Real Academia Española (2001) Diccionario de la Lengua Española. Real Academia Española. 22a edición URL: http://dle.rae.es/?w=parlache&o=h (accessed 2 October 2017)

Rojo, Ana (2009) Step by Step. A Course in Contrastive Linguistics and Translation, Oxford, Peter  Lang.

Romero, Paula (2007) “La delimitación de las unidades fraseológicas en la investigación alemana y española”, Interlingüística, no.17: 905-914.

Ruiz, Leonor (2001) Las locuciones del español actual, Madrid, Arco libros.

Stein, Stephan (2007) “Mündlichkeit und Schriftlichkeit aus phraseologischer Perspektive” in Phraseologie: ein Internationals Handbuch der zeitgenössichen Forschung, Harald Burger, Dmitrij Dobrovol’skij, Peter Kühn and Neal R. Norrick (eds), Berlin, New York: Walter de Gruyter: 220-236.

Tobón, Julio (1997) Colombianismos, Medellin, Colección Autores Antioqueños.

Vila, Neus,  Castañeda, Luz Stella (2006) “Hacia un diccionario de parlache: estudio lexicográfico de un argot colombiano”, Quaderni del CIRSIL, no.5: 121-134. URL: www.lingue.unibo.it/cirsil

Vila, Neus, and Orduña, José Luis (2012) “Locuciones del parlache y del argot común español: estudio Gramatical y léxico” in El argot entre España y Colombia. Estudios léxicos y  pragmáticos, Neus Vila and Luz Stella Castañeda (eds), Lleida, Edicions de la Universitat  de Lleida: 57-83.

Wotjak, Barbara (1987) “Aspekte einer konfrontativen Beschreibung von Phraseolexemen: deutsch-spanisch”, Linguistische Arbeitsberichte, no. 59: 86-100.

Wotjak, Barbara (1992) “Problem einer konfrontativen Phraseologieforschung am Beispiel   verbaler Phraseolexeme” in Untersuchungen zur Phraseologie des Deutschen und   anderer Sprachen: einzelsprachspezifisch-kontrastiv-vergleichend, Jarmo Korhonen  (ed), Frankfurt am Main, Peter Lang: 39-60.

Wotjak, Gerd (1995) “Equivalencia semántica, equivalencia comunicativa y equivalencia translémica”, Hyeronimus Complutensis, no. 1: 93-111.

Zuluaga, Alberto (1998) “Análisis y traducción de unidades fraseológicas desautomatizadas”,  Lingüística y Literatura, no. 34/35: 203-220.

Zuluaga, Alberto (2002) “Los ‘enlaces frecuentes’ de María Moliner. Observaciones sobre las  Lamadas colocaciones”, PhiN, Vol. 22. URL: http://www.phin.de (accessed 2  October 2017)

Zurdo, María Teresa (1999) “Sobre la adecuación del método contrastivo para el análisis  interlingüístico de fraseologismos” in La lengua alemana y sus literaturas en el contexto  europeo. Siglos XI y XX. Estudios dedicados a Feliciano Pérez Varas. (Acta  salmaticensia. Estudios filológicos 276), Brigitte Eggelte, Vicente González and Ofelia  Martí (eds), Salamanca, Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca: 353-363.

Zurdo, María Teresa (2005) “Panorama de los estudios fraseológicos en Alemania” in Fraseología contrastiva: con ejemplos tomados del alemán, español, francés e italiano, Ramón Almela, Estanislao Ramón and Gerd Wotjak (eds), Murcia, Universidad de Murcia, Servicio de Publicaciones: 39-63.

Notes

[1] Politically, Colombia is divided into 32 departamentos (similar to states); Antioquia is one of them.

[2] A jargon originated and developed in deprived socio-economic areas of Medellín which has spread across other strata of the country (my translation).

[3] “Phraseological units belonging to a language system with inherent fixation and meaning, which are not part of complete statements, and generally work as sentence elements” (My translation)

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"The orality features of Parlache in the novel Rosario Tijeras, by Jorge Franco, and their German and English translations"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2468

Sprachliche Varietäten und Variationen in der Science-Fiction – mit Fokussierung auf das Bairische

By Günter Koch (University of Passau, Germany)

Abstract & Keywords

English:

German dialect varieties employed in movies and in television serials are most often criticized in a harsh way, except only a few productions. The reason is that the varieties used do not correspond to the form of original, basic dialect, but show artificial features transporting stereotypes. Examples from the movie Der Verdingbub (Germany 2013) proves that artificial dialect, especially learned by the actor, meets to what the audience expects to be authentic speech. The genre of science fiction, which always is confronted with the accusation of being trivial, is a place where varieties play an important role. This can be shown for instance with the novel Der Untergang der Stadt Passau (1975), written by Carl Amery, which is an adaption of Walter M. Millers A Canticle for Leibowitz (1959). With all the varieties employed in Miller’s novel and all the language games, it is a challenge to translate the novel into German. As the adaption by Carl Amery shows, dialectal continuum can be used to create certain constellations of the characters. The employment of language varieties is the key to text interpretation. Against this background, two further novels written by Carl Amery are analyzed on speech usage, Das Königsprojekt (1974) and An den Feuern der Leyermark (1979). Furthermore, two science fiction movies are regarded within this context, Xaver (Germany 1985) and “Zombies from outer space” (Germany 2012). With all these works, the artful novels as well as the – at first glance – trivial movies, I want to demonstrate, that employment of dialect varieties exceeds the basic functions to give authenticity and a stereotyped distribution of the characters, in a way, which can be described as meta-symbolization within the fictive world.

German:

Die Verwendung von Dialekt in den Medien wird, bis auf wenige Ausnahmen, scharf kritisiert, da es sich nicht um ursprünglichen Dialekt handle, sondern um künstliche Varietäten, die allenfalls Klischees transportieren können. An Ausschnitten des Films Der Verdingbub (2013) kann gezeigt werden, dass künstlicher – das heißt, eigens für die Filmproduktion erlernter Dialekt – durchaus authentisch wirken kann. Auch für das Genre der Science-Fiction, das sich generell dem Vorwurf der Trivialität zu erwehren hat, spielen Dialekte und Varietäten eine bedeutende Rolle, wie Carl Amery mit seinem Roman Der Untergang der Stadt Passau (1975) zeigt, einer Adaption von Walter M. Millers Roman A Canticle for Leibowitz (1959, dt. 1971). Bereits die Übersetzung des englischsprachigen Originals in die deutsche Sprache stellt aufgrund zahlreicher Sprachspiele und verwendeter Varietäten eine Herausforderung für die Übersetzer dar. Carl Amery zeigt, dass sich das Dialektkontinuum zwischen Standard und Dialekt für eine Figurenkonstellation nutzen lässt. Die Sprachverwendung wird zum Schlüssel für das Verständnis des Textes. Vor diesem Hintergrund werden zwei weitere Romane C. Amerys betrachtet: Das Königsprojekt (1974) und An den Feuern der Leyermark (1979). Schließlich wird auch bairische Sprachverwendung in Science-Fiction-Filmen exemplarisch interpretiert: Xaver (1985) und „Zombies from outer Space“ (2012). Alle Werke, sowohl die literarisch ausgefeilten Romane als auch die scheinbar trivialen Filmproduktionen, zeigen, dass Dialektverwendung über die Grundfunktionen, Authentizität zu vermitteln und eine plakative Rollenverteilung zu bewirken, hinausgeht und für eine differenzierte Meta-Symbolisierung diegetisch genutzt werden kann.

Keywords: Authentizität, Bairisch, Kunstdialekt, Metasymbolisierung, Sprachspiel, Carl Amery, dialect, authenticity, Bavarian, character design, meta-symbolization, science fiction

©inTRAlinea & Günter Koch (2019).
"Sprachliche Varietäten und Variationen in der Science-Fiction – mit Fokussierung auf das Bairische"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2459

1. Zur ‚Echtheit‘ von Dialekten im Medium Film

Zwei scheinbar völlig divergente Dinge – zum einen die Dialektverwendung im Film, zum anderen das Genre der Science-Fiction (Roman und Film) – werden unabhängig voneinander zumeist als triviale Gegenstände abgeurteilt. Umso mehr müsste dies gelten, wenn in Science-Fiction-Texten beziehungsweise -Filmen Dialekt verwendet wird. Deshalb drängt sich folgende Frage auf: Kann Dialekt, und vor allem reduzierter, künstlicher Dialekt, wie er in Filmproduktionen eingesetzt wird, nur in trivialisierender Weise verwendet werden, als Stereotyp der Volkstümelei? Kann daraus abgeleitet werden, dass das Spiel mit Varietäten in der Science-Fiction gerade deshalb so beliebt ist, weil sich damit ein allseits bekanntes Stereotyp in eine triviale Kunstform schablonenhaft einbinden lässt? Dieser Beitrag fokussiert daher einleitend die Dialektverwendung in Filmen allgemein: Ziel ist, dem von der jüngeren Forschung aufgestellten, recht einseitigen Bild der Dialektverwendung eine differenziertere Sichtweise gegenüberzustellen. Darauf aufbauend kann dann auch nach einer sinnhaften Verwendung im Genre der Science-Fiction gefragt werden. Grundlegende These ist, dass die Dialektverwendung zwar aus trivialen Gründen erfolgen kann, dass aber daraus kein Pauschalurteil abgeleitet werden darf: Anhand eingehender Analysen sprachlicher Variationen in ausgewählten Science-Fiction-Romanen und -Filmen soll exemplarisch erkennbar werden, welch semiotisches Potential sich im Zusammenwirken von Varietätenverwendung und literarischer Kunstform entfalten kann.

Varietäten der deutschen Sprache führen in den Medien ein Schattendasein, vielfach wird mangelnde Differenzierung der Figuren durch das Varietätenspektrum beklagt. In besonderer Weise betrifft das dialektale Varietäten, die aufgrund mangelnder Dialekt­kompetenz von jungen Darstellern immer seltener Verwendung finden. Sollte aber tatsächlich einmal Dialekt verwendet werden, so wird häufig die reduzierte Form, und damit die fehlende Authentizität, kritisiert: So meint Strassner (1986: 323), der Medien-Dialekt sei fast immer unecht, synthetisch, simuliert und werde für anspruchslose Unterhaltung eingesetzt. Als Beispiel dafür kann das sogenannte „Komödienstadl-Bairisch“ (Berlinger 1983: 275; Zehetner 1985: 187) gelten: Die Bezeichnung bezieht sich auf das bayerische Volksschauspiel Der Komödienstadl (Bayerischer Rundfunk, seit 1959), in dem häufig abgeflachter, mit sprachlichen Stereotypen durchsetzter Dialekt Verwendung findet. Mittlerweile dient dieser Begriff als Bezeichnung für jedwede Art von künstlich wirkendem Bairisch in den Medien. In varietätenlinguistischen Studien wird dieser reduzierte Dialekt gerne als Kontrastfolie genommen, um auf sprachlicher Ebene qualitativ hochwertigere, ‚natürlich-bairische‘ Produktionen positiv davon abzusetzen, wie etwa bei Dobkowitz (2009: 69), hier wird dem reduzierten Dialekt das Attribut dümmlich zugeschrie­ben. Dennoch sollte die Sprachform dieses Schauspiels differenzierter betrachtet werden, da nicht alle Komödienstadl-Produktionen vergleichbar sind: So ist etwa Herzsolo (2005) unter die basisdialektalen Produktionen einzuordnen (Kleiner 2013: 446). Aus wissenschaftlicher Perspektive sollte daher auf die populäre Bezeichnung verzichtet werden. Außerdem sollte eine differenziertere Sichtweise eingenommen werden, die Varietäten nicht nach ihrer ‚Echtheit‘, ‚Natürlichkeit‘ oder ‚Reinheit‘ beurteilt und einen ideellen basisdialektalen Sprachstand älterer oder gar vergangener Generationen fordert, sondern der gegenwärtigen Wirklichkeit entspricht. Der Purismus in Bezug auf ‚echte‘ Dialekte leugnet die dynamische Stabilität von Sprache, die in der Sprachwandelforschung allgemein akzeptiert ist (Berlinger 1983: 214-220). Allenfalls kann der Begriff der Stimmigkeit angewandt werden (Berlinger 1983: 220-226), wenn tatsächlich Dialekt-, aber auch Regiolektfremdes und umgangssprachlich Ungebräuchliches vorkommt, vor allem aber dann, wenn dialektale und nicht-dialektale Formen nebeneinander auftreten. Besonders in der Lautung fällt auf, wenn ein Wort einmal dialektal, einmal standardnah ausgesprochen wird. Aber selbst hier kann eine funktionale Motivation vorhanden sein, zum Beispiel eine Fokussierung – der Übergang zwischen Wirklichkeit und Künstlichkeit muss letztlich als fließend akzeptiert werden. Dass Künstlichkeit dialektalen Sprechens als Medienphänomen tatsächlich existiert und allgemein bekannt ist, zeigt am deutlichsten eine parodistische Produktion des Bayerischen Rundfunks: In den Folgen Altbayerisch für Einsteiger (Teil der Comedy-Show Die Komiker, produziert seit 1998; die Sketch-Serie Altbayerisch für Einsteiger 2003-2009 umfasst 28 Folgen), werden basisdialektale Passagen durch eine ‚Lehrerin‘ mit – augenscheinlich – standardsprachlicher Artikulationsbasis wiederholt; durch diese Kontrastierung wird die oftmals kritisierte Künstlichkeit bloßgestellt.

Dass fehlende Dialektkompetenz durch das Erlernen einiger weniger, aber charakteristischer Dialektmerkmale kompensiert werden kann, zeigt zum Beispiel die Analyse der Filmbiographie Margarethe Steiff aus dem Jahre 2005 (Koch 2012: 472-474): In diesem Film übernahm Heike Makatsch, gebürtig in Düsseldorf und keineswegs eines alemannischen Dialekts mächtig, die Rolle der schwäbischen Protagonistin und nahm eigens dafür Dialektunterricht, um sich wesentliche Eigenschaften der dialektalen Sprechweise anzueignen. Vor allem in der Stimmführung kann eine vom Standard abweichende, dem Schwäbischen ähnliche Intonation festgestellt werden. Da diese Sprechweise konstant beibehalten wird, auch wenn sie nicht tatsächlich authentisch ist, kann dies durchaus als eine gelungene Figurenprofilierung bezeichnet werden (Koch 2012: 472-474). Eine andere Vorgehensweise liegt in dem Film Der Verdingbub von 2013 vor: Katja Riemann, die in Kirchweye bei Bremen aufwuchs und die ersten 20 Lebensjahre in Norddeutschland verbrachte (Wikipedia 2015), spielt eine schweizerische Bäuerin zur Mitte des 20. Jahrhunderts: In der deutschen Fassung fallen keine beziehungsweise nur sehr wenige umgangssprachlich-dialektale Abweichungen vom Standarddeutschen auf – allerdings spricht Katja Riemann auf der Tonspur „Schweizerdeutsch“ eine extra für diesen Film erlernte basisdialektale Varietät. Zumindest für ‚nicht-native Ohren‘ scheint hier ein Maximum an Authentizität und die Grenze der Verstehbarkeit erreicht zu sein:

0:35:05

Der Bösiger ist ein Vieh!

Dt.

[deɐ̯ ˈbøːsɪgɐ ˈɪst ai̯n ˈviː]

Schw.-dt.

[dr ˈbœsɪgr ˀɪʃ əs viːħ]

1:12:10

Kannst du nicht einmal bei der Beerdigung deiner Mutter das Saufen sein lassen!

Dt.

[ˈkanst˺du ˈnɪçt ai̯nˈmɑl bai̯ dɛɐ̯ bəˀˈɛɐ̯dɪgʊŋ fɔn ˈdai̯nɐ ˈmʊtɐ das ˈzau̯fn̩ zai̯n ˈlasn̩]

Schw.-dt.

[ˈkɑːʃt ɑ ˈnɪt ɑˈmɑːl ɑ bɑˈœɐ̯dɪgʊŋ foː ˈdɪrɑ ˈmuɐ̯tr ˈd̥suːfɑ ˈlɑsɪ]

Ausschnitte aus DVD Der Verdingbub, Min. 35 und Min. 1:12

Der Regisseur Markus Imboden gibt an, Katja Riemann habe darauf bestanden, alles auf Schweizerdeutsch zu sagen, es sei manchmal aber kaum zu verstehen (DVD Der Verdingbub: Featurette, Min. 1:20-2:00). In der Originalfassung sprechen auch andere Darsteller alemannischen Basisdialekt; für die deutschsprachige Fassung wurden alle Varietäten synchronisiert.

Kleiner (2013: 446) stellt fest, „dass sich unter den dialektalsten Produktionen auffallend viele Umsetzungen historischer Stoffe finden“. Doch auch die niedrige Dialektalität im Münchner Tatort (eine Krimiserie) könne man als durchaus realitätsnah und typisch ansehen, wenn die heutigen Sprachverhältnisse berücksichtigt werden. Gerade für historische oder biographische Inszenierungen, bei denen auf zahlreiche Details geachtet werden muss, um Authentizität zu erzeugen, sollte es ein Muss sein, auch eine entsprechende sprachliche Gestaltung zumindest in Erwägung zu ziehen. Neben dieser primären Funktion, der Erzeugung von Authentizität, kann das Varietätenspektrum zusätzlich zur Figurendifferenzierung genutzt werden. So wird in zahlreichen Krimiserien verfahren, in denen meist ein Ermittler-Duo aus unterschiedlichen Regionen Deutschlands zum Einsatz kommt, das sich häufig durch einen Nord-Süd-Gegensatz auszeichnet. Beispiele hierfür wären Der Bulle von Tölz, Die Rosenheim-Cops, Stubbe – von Fall zu Fall (Koch 2008: 84). Eine Klischee-Bildung bleibt nicht aus, im Sinne eines Limitationsstereotyps (Konerding 2001: 167) wird der standardsprachlichen Varietät, mit der ‚das Norddeutsche‘ substituiert wird, das ‚Rationale‘ und ‚Moderne‘ zugeordnet, den dialektalen Subsystemen das ‚Emotionale‘ und das ‚Bodenständig-Traditionelle‘.

Im Folgenden soll der Frage nachgegangen werden, ob die Varietätenvielfalt nicht auch für andere Zwecke genutzt werden kann. In der Science-Fiction, als Experimentierfeld par excellence, scheint sich ein geeignetes Genre anzubieten, das eben nicht auf die Primärfunktion der Authentizitätssicherung angewiesen ist – zumal den Dialekten ohnehin in näherer Zukunft Dialektabbau im Sinne einer Regionalisierung oder gar der Dialektverlust prophezeit wird. Auffällig ist deshalb, dass in zahlreichen Science-Fiction-Romanen Wert auf sprachliche Differenzierung gelegt wird. Beispielsweise wird in Philipp K. Dicks Roman Der heimliche Rebell (1981) durch die Verwendung von Umgangssprache die Nonkonformität des Protagonisten in einem totalitären Regime zum Ausdruck gebracht. Der Schwerpunkt soll auf drei Science-Fiction-Romanen von Carl Amery liegen, die in den 1970er Jahren verfasst wurden: Das Königsprojekt (1974), Der Untergang der Stadt Passau (1975) und An den Feuern der Leyermark (1979). Carl Amerys Nachname stellt ein selbstgewähltes Anagramm für Mayer dar – das Spiel mit Namen ist in allen der drei genannten Werke zu finden. Da er gebürtiger Münchner war, in Freising und Passau zur Schule ging (Koch 2016: 178-180), ist es nicht verwunderlich, dass der bairische Dialekt bei diesem Schriftsteller eine gewisse Rolle spielt – die Frage ist nur, mit welcher Funktion Dialekt besetzt wird. Einen Schlüssel zur Interpretation bietet er selbst im Vorwort des Romans Der Untergang der Stadt Passau an: Er verweist auf das Erscheinen der deutschen Fassung des Romans A Canticle for Leibowitz, zu dt. Lobgesang auf Leibowitz von Walter M. Miller jr. im Heyne-Verlag, was ihn dazu bewegt habe, seine „Fingerübung fertigzustellen und diesem Verlag anzubieten“ (UdSP 5). Ein Vergleich beider Romane, also Amerys Untergang der Stadt Passau und Millers Lobgesang auf Leibowitz, zeigt, dass sich Amery wesentlich von Millers Roman inspirieren ließ, sowohl was die Erzählstruktur anbelangt, als auch, und das steht hier im Fokus des Interesses, das Einbringen von Wissen über Sprache, auf metasprachlicher Ebene, und das Gestalten der eingesetzten Varietäten auf objektsprachlicher Ebene betrifft (Koch 2014).

Im Anschluss daran werden zwei Science-Fiction-Filme analysiert, die aufgrund ihres experimentellen Charakters – ähnlich der ‚Fingerübung‘ Carl Amerys – werkspezifische Umsetzungen von Varietätenverwendung in Aussicht stellen. Bei Xaver und sein außerirdischer Freund (1985) handelt es sich um eine Symbiose aus Heimatfilm und Science-Fiction, bei Zombies from outer Space“ (2012) gar um einen Brückenschlag zwischen mehreren Genres, laut DVD-Aufmachung ist es „der erste bayerische Sci-Fi-Horror-Heimatfilm“.

2. Vergleich der englischen und der deutschen Fassung von Walter M. Millers Roman A Canticle for Leibowitz

Ein Hinweis darauf, in welcher Sprache – Englisch oder in deutscher Übersetzung von Jürgen Saupe und Erev – Amery den Roman Millers rezipierte, kann in einer zentralen Stelle gefunden werden: Die engl. Aufforderung Let’s go! (CfL 64) wird in der deutschen Fassung mit Auf geht’s! (LaL 65) übersetzt und von Amery in dieser Form als ‚Schlachtruf der Rosmer‘ übernommen, im Fettdruck hervorgehoben und mit einer Anmerkung versehen, in der auf die bairische Form dieses Schlachtrufs – af gets – im lateinischen ‚Originaltext‘ hingewiesen wird. Ausschlaggebend aber scheint die Frage, ob das Buch auf Deutsch oder Englisch rezipiert wurde, nicht zu sein, denn ein Vergleich zeigt, dass vieles, vor allem der spielerische Umgang mit Sprache, wenn auch nicht direkt übersetzt, so doch adäquat umgesetzt wurde. Dazu einige Beispiele:

Umsetzungen mit translatorischen Freiheiten sind zum Beispiel house catcat house (CfL 22) vs. HundehausHaushunde (LaL 25), die Fehlfunktion des Autoscribe, z. B. bookLEGgerS (CfL 250) vs. buchSCHMUGglern (LaL 236) oder die onomatopoetische Umsetzung der Geräusche dieses Geräts (CfL 255 – LaL 241). Aber auch Grenzen der Umsetzbarkeit sind erkennbar: Im Original wird z. B. das Alleghenian equivalent eines Schreibens in spiegelverkehrtem Englisch abgedruckt (CfL 256), in der deutschen Ausgabe (LaL 241-242) wird auf diese Möglichkeit – wohl aus drucktechnischen Gründen – verzichtet.

Eine Redepassage der Mrs. Grales – einer Mutantin – mit einem Priester sei hier beispielhaft kommentiert:

“Beg shriv’ness, yer honors,” said Mrs. Grales, “but’s not the pup’s motherful condition as makes her so, devil fret her! But ’tis ’at man of mine. He’s witched the piteous pup, he has—for love of witchin’—and it makes her ’feared of all. I beg yer honors’ shriv’ness for her naughties.“ (CfL 272)

»Bitte um Vergebung, Euer Ehrens«, sagte Mrs. Grales, »aber ’s is nich dem Hund sein Zustand als künftige Mutter, was sie so wütend macht, der Teufel soll sie braten! Es is der Kerl, was mein Mann is. Er hat se verhext, den armen Köter, hat er – aus Spaß am Hexen, und nu isse änxlich vor allem. Ich bitte Euer Ehrens um Vergebigung für dem Hund seine Ungezochenheit.« (LaL 257)

Es zeigt sich, dass nicht alles umgesetzt wird: Das seltene, dazu mit Elision markierte Lexem shriv’ness wird durch das neutrale Wort Vergebung wiedergegeben; yer gilt als dialektale oder vulgäre Aussprache von you(r), übersetzt mit der neutralen höflichen Form, zudem mit Großschreibung. Zahlreiche Feinheiten werden in der Übersetzung aber berücksichtigt beziehungsweise, wo notwendig, substituiert. So wird die wiederholte Nennung shrivness im Deutschen durch eine Form mit Sprossvokal kompensiert, das inkorrekt als Substantiv gebrauchte Adjektiv naughties wird durch eine g-Frikativierung mit <ch> (Ungezochenheit) als umgangssprachliche Form markiert; das im Original falsche Possessivpronomen her – richtig wäre it – wird im Deutschen, da hier alle drei Genera zumindest akzeptabel wären, durch eine falsche Kasuskongruenz substituiert. Die Kontamination ’feared aus to be afraid und to fear zu *to affear, wobei die erste Silbe elidiert wird, wird im Deutschen durch eine phonetisch motivierte graphische Alternativschreibung kompensiert. Honors ist nach dem Oxford English Dictionary „formerly (and still in rustic speech), given to any person of rank or quality“ (Murray et al. 1989: VII, 357), nunmehr ein vor allem juristischer Amtstitel. Als deutsche Entsprechung wird hier eine adäquate Wiedergabe durch Ehrens gewählt – mit im Deutschen falscher, aber expliziter Pluralmarkierung analog zum englischen Musterlexem; kotextuell richtig wäre im Englischen (father) referend (oder auch confessor), im Deutschen Hochwürden. Diese wenigen Beispiele zeigen, dass zwar nicht alle sprachlichen Sonderheiten des Originals übertragen wurden, vieles aber berücksichtigt und, wo möglich, auch kreativ kompensiert wurde.

Die Dichte sprachspielerischer Reflexion mag Carl Amery dazu bewogen haben, seine eigenen Romane in ähnlicher Weise zu gestalten. Amery studierte in München Neue Philologien und erwarb damit auch sprachwissenschaftliche Kenntnisse, die er zur Umsetzung seiner Ideen nutzen konnte.

3. Die Science-Fiction-Romane von Carl Amery

3.1 Carl Amery, Das Königsprojekt (1974)

Ein Jahr vor dem Roman Der Untergang der Stadt Passau publizierte Carl Amery den Roman Das Königsprojekt. Zwar spielt die Haupthandlung in der Vergangenheit, in den 1950er Jahren, doch wird mit Zeitreisen ein typisches Motiv der Science-Fiction-Literatur verwendet. Die Zeitreisen, ermöglicht durch eine Erfindung Leonardo da Vincis, führen jedoch nicht wie bei Orson Wells in die Zukunft, sondern in die Vergangenheit. Im Dienste der katholischen Kirche werden von Agenten aus der Reihe der Schweizer Garde kleine historische Korrekturen vorgenommen, um die Position des Vatikans in der Gegenwart zu stärken. Dabei dürfen aber nur Änderungen an Zuständen und Vorgängen vorgenommen werden, die nicht in die Historiographie übergegangen sind, da sonst eine Rückkehr in eine unmodifizierte Gegenwart nicht mehr möglich wäre. Falls doch, so würde sich der Agent in einer Raum-Zeit-Schleife auflösen. Mit einem dieser Agenten, Arnold Füßli, ist bereits ein sprachlicher Akzent gesetzt, Carl Amery lässt alemannische Sprachformen einfließen: So fordert er in einer Mission zu Beginn des Romans, einem Zweikampf mit Settimo Capobue, seinen Kontrahenten mit den Worten Khumm, Chaibe und khumm, Stierli (KP 12, standarddt. ‘Komm, Kälbchen, komm’ und ‘Komm, Stierlein’) heraus, bezugnehmend auf das Grundwort im italienischen Namen. Die Rückreisen mit der Zeitmaschine in die Gegenwart sind stets von der pejorativen Formel Z’ruckh i’ de’ Seich (standarddt. ‘Zurück in die Seiche’) begleitet. Auch an seinem eigenen Namen nimmt Füßli Übersetzungen vor, je nachdem, wohin die Zeitreisen gehen: So nennt er sich Messer Arnaldo Piecorto, Harald von Luetzelbeyn (auch: Lützelbeyn), Harold Whyte-Footling, Harmonios Mikropodos, Arnault-ès-Petitz-Piés (KP 104, 118, 224). Hier wird bereits die Spielfreudigkeit Amerys mit sprachlichem Material deutlich. Ein weiterer Beleg dafür ist die Bezeichnung der Zeitmaschine mit dem Akronym MYSTMacchina Ingeniosa Spazio-Temporale; dass im Silbenkern des Akronyms kein <I> steht, ist der schweizerdeutschen Herkunft der Agenten geschuldet, die sich weigern, in einer Mistmaschine zu reisen (KP 26). Bei dieser Minimalpaarbildung ist die Fallhöhe enorm – wird mit MYST etwas Geheimnisvoll-Sakrales assoziiert, so bewirkt das profane Lexem Mist ein Maximum an Kontrast. Am Ende des dritten Buches wird auktorial bestätigt, dass die MYST-Maschine „[m]ehr Gutes tat […] in ihrem Sterben als je in der Blüte ihrer Macht.“ (KP 236). Aus der Nichtigkeit des Zusammenhangs scheint die Interpretation gerechtfertigt, dass mit der Zeitmaschine tatsächlich nur Mist produziert wurde.

Im weiteren Verlauf der Erzählung entsteht eine bayerisch-schottische Allianz, die zur Inthronisation eines legitimen Stuart-Nachfolgers, des Wittelsbachers Kronprinz Rupprecht von Bayern (1919-1955), führen sollte. Ein zweiter Protagonist entstammt deshalb dem bairischen Sprachraum, es handelt sich um Jimmy Krauthobler, und der Name deutet schon eine Symbiose des englisch- und bairischsprachigen Raumes an. Durch die Aufnahme per Ehrenmitgliedschaft in den schottischen Clan der McLaubhraighs wird sein Vorname in Seumas [ʃɛi̯məs] überführt – im Text wird abwechselnd die Verschriftung Seumas und Säumaß verwendet; auch hier klafft, wie bei der MYST- beziehungsweise Mistmaschine, der Anspruch des Namens mit der Umsetzung der Ideale in der Realität eklatant auseinander: Während [ʃɛi̯məs] die tatsächliche gälische Variante von James (beziehungsweise dt. Jakob) ist und als abgrenzender Eigenname der schottischen Identität zuträglich ist, kann die Verschriftung Säumaß als Wortbildung reanalysiert, zu paraphrasieren als ‘nach Maß einer Sau’, und mit der Affixoidbildung saumäßig assoziiert werden, in der Bedeutung von ‘miserabel’. Geradezu ikonisch wird das bei einem Überholmanöver deutlich: Er wischte zwischen einem Lastwagen und einem Traktor durch, der Laster hupte fluchend, Säumaß hob majestätisch die Rechte. (KP 76).

Diese Kluft wird in der Sprachverwendung Jimmy Krauthoblers reflektiert: Nur im bairischen Dialekt ist Krauthobler tatsächlich sprachlich kompetent, wie einige sehr basisdialektale Verschriftungen zeigen:

Dees pack ma’, sagens ihm das. […] Die Senftlgauer Schützen machen mit und die Veteranen von Jarezöd und der Brummachervater von Angelskirch – siemadachzg ist der. Für die Trattation gengas durch dick und dünn, sagens ihm das. Für Ruppert of Bavaria. (KP 62, Hervorhebung GK; standarddt. ‘Das packen (= schaffen) wir’, ‘siebenundachtzig’ und ‘gehen sie’)

Des Weiteren spricht er ein feierliches Hochdeutsch, welches das eigentliche dramatische Bühnenbayrisch ist (KP 39): Dieses zeichnet sich durch eine Transliteration dialektaler Lexeme und Syntax aus, wie zum Beispiel die täte-Periphrase als Ersatz des Konjunktiv II: Ein Zeichen taten wir brauchen. (KP 140)

Nachdem Krauthobler in den Clan der McLaubhraighs aufgenommen wurde, bedient er sich auch gälischer Redewendungen, zum Beispiel Chlanna nan con. Dabei handelt es sich um die Anfangsworte des Schlachtrufes des Clans, der übersetzt Söhne von Hunden, kommt und holt euch Fleisch! (KP 41) bedeutet. Dass Jimmy Krauthobler den Schlachtruf nicht versteht, zeigt sich darin, dass er die abgekürzte Wendung als biederen Gruß (KP 76) verwendet oder als heitere Rückversicherungspartikel (KP 181). Auch die Verbindung dieser Diskursfloskel mit bairischem Dialekt und dem Namen Krauthobler bewirkt eine skurrile Kombination: „Hurrah! schreien die Bayern, „chlanna nan con, kemmts“ der Krauthobler (KP 231). Zudem spiegelt Krauthoblers ‚Bavarian English‘ ein nur bedingtes Verständnis dessen wider, was sich die Jakobiter als ideelles Ziel gesetzt haben: Schtuart, forever, juchu! (KP 64, auch KP 231). Misslungen ist zudem die Übersetzung des schottischen Schlachtrufs ins Bairische, die er bei einer Feldübung anwendet: Kemmts Hundsbuam, und holts enker Fleisch! (KP 78). Das Possessivpronomen bair. enker (standarddt. ‘euer’) entspricht nicht der standarddeutschen Vorlage mit Personalpronomen euch. Außerdem ist das Lexem Hundsbuam nicht primär als Schimpfwort zu sehen, so wie es im Kampfschrei provozierend mit Söhne von Hunden gemeint ist: Zwar handelt es sich bei hunds- um ein „emotional verstärkendes pejoratives Präfixoid“ (Zehetner 2005: 193), doch in Verbindung mit dem Grundwort Bub steht eher eine halbernste Verwendung im Vordergrund, wie es etwa bei einem Lausbubenstreich der Fall wäre.

Dieser kurze Einblick soll genügen, um an den beiden Protagonisten die Funktionalisierung dialektaler Sprechweise aufzuzeigen. Zum einen spricht Arnold Füßli, der Agent der Schweizer Garde, durchgängig Dialekt, schlüpft aber auch sprachlich perfekt in seine verschiedenen Rollen – als Harold Whyte-Footling spricht er zum Beispiel Englisch mit australischem Akzent (KP 99), nicht aber mit schweizerdeutschem Akzent. Das deutet darauf hin, dass er trotz seiner Wandlungs- und Anpassungsfähigkeit an die verschiedensten Gegebenheiten seiner Missionen, bester Ausdruck davon sind seine akribischen Namensübersetzungen, stets seine Identität wahrt. Paradoxerweise doppelt sich aber später bei einer Zeitreise seine Existenz und er begegnet sich sogar selbst.

Dagegen wird im Sprachgebrauch Jimmy Krauthoblers erkennbar, dass seiner Wandlungsfähigkeit enge Grenzen gesetzt sind, dass Identitätsprobleme vorliegen. Diegetisch ist diese Selbstfindungsproblematik mit einem Unfall in seiner Kindheit verbunden, als ihm nämlich ein Gipsrelief mit dem Konterfei Ludwigs II. bei der Wandmontage auf den Kopf fiel (KP 44). Ein Figuren-Pendant zu Jimmy Krauthobler stellt dessen Freundin Heike Vulpius dar: In einer kleineren Auseinandersetzung mit Jimmy Krauthobler kollidiert ihr Kopf mit eben jenem Kunstwerk, das bereits Krauthobler als Kind auf den Kopf gefallen war (KP 136). Als Folge davon wird sie auf der Clan-Feier unbewusst zu einem Gefäß und Brunnenschacht keltischer Weissagung (KP 141). Obwohl die Ehrenmitgliedschaft in einem schottischen Clan erkauft ist und die traditionellen Feiern mehr schlecht als recht inszeniert sind, gibt sich Krauthobler damit hundertprozentig zufrieden, er glaubt seine Identität als schottischer Krieger gefunden zu haben. Sein Sprachgebrauch zeigt sowohl seine Zerissenheit zwischen den Identitätsangeboten, aber auch deren Verschmelzung. Auch in der Bindestrich-Schreibung seines Namens wird das deutlich: »To hell with England!« schrie Jimmy-Säumaß lachend (KP 76).

Die anderen Figuren des Romans zeigen ebenfalls zahlreiche sprachliche Besonderheiten. Auffällig sind wiederum Sprachmischungen: So spricht der Amerikaner Dwight Enigmatinger mit englischen Diskursmarkern mit seinen Kollegen (KP 24), Fabio Garetti dagegen mit französischen Diskursmarkern (KP 93); das Deutsch der Fürstin Araktschejewa war makellos bis schnoddrig, mit fast amerikanischen Spracheigenheiten und einer darunterliegenden romanischen Melodie (KP 75); der Akzent von Flora schwankt zwischen Chicago und Montreux (KP 102). Ein amerikanischer Mafia-Boss spricht mit Akzent Flatbush oder Brooklyn, mit ethnischen Eigenheiten (KP 117), den Amery in einen deutschen Dialekt transponiert, der eine Mischung aus Berlinisch und Sächsisch darstellt. Der Regisseur Ferdy Boznyak spricht Umgangssprache mit ethnolektaler Morphosyntax (KP 179/180). Der Dialekt von Heike Vulpius verschiebt sich in der Erregung von der Binnenalster in Richtung Berlin-Kreuzberg (KP 136); der Hüter des Krönungssteins spricht Gälisch oder Broadscotch, worauf Arnold Füßli mit einigen Silben, die philologisch nicht einzuordnen sind (KP 157/158), antwortet. Besonders spielerisch ist ein undurchsichtiger Doppelagent gestaltet, indem ein – scheinbar – ebenso undurchsichtiger Idiolekt konstruiert wird: Allerdings lässt sich dieser leicht entschlüsseln als eine systematische Graph- beziehungsweise Graphemsubstitution von <n> durch <d> und <m> durch <b>, sowie weitere Substitutionen, zum Beispiel des velaren Nasals in Wörtern wie danken > dacken oder England > Eggladd (KP 163), außerdem ist eine l- und r-Elision im Silbenendrand festzustellen. Insgesamt entsteht dadurch aber ein vornehmes, näselnd und auch eingebildet wirkendes Idiom:

Zerbotti: Schottladd, Schottladd! Wedd Sie bich fragng, eid Loyalittätsfaß ohde Bodd. Jeddfalls für das Haus Widdso’. (KP 161)

Ein auktorialer Einschub klärt übrigens darüber auf, dass dieser Sprecher im Glauben handelt, für den polnischen Geheimdienst zu agieren, tatsächlich aber ist er lediglich privater Informant eines enorm gebildeten und neugierigen polnischen Diplomaten (KP 164).

Zuletzt sei noch auf einen Wiener verwiesen, der allerdings sehr basisdialektal spricht, was wohl damit zu begründen ist, dass er in Isolation lebt, wenn auch in London (KP 171).

Es stellt sich natürlich die Frage, warum in diesem Roman derart zahlreiche Sprachmischungen auftreten. Die individuellen Varietäten symbolisieren die äußerst komplexe Handlung, in der letztlich alle Figuren ihre eigenen Ziele verfolgen und versuchen, diese durch Intrigen und Bündnisse mit anderen Figuren zu erreichen.

Zusammenfassend lässt sich festhalten, dass die Varietätenvielfalt in Carl Amerys Roman Das Königsprojekt keineswegs willkürlich, sondern der Textwelt perfekt angepasst ist. Auch eine wesentliche Parallele zur MYST-Maschine lässt sich erkennen – bei diesem Gerät ist man darauf bedacht, sogenannte Friktionen, also Raum-Zeit-Brüche, zu vermeiden, um Kontinuitäten zu wahren und die Position des Vatikans zu stärken. Die Gegenwart zeigt dagegen in ihrer babylonischen Sprachenvielfalt, dass eine Zersplitterung der Gesellschaft in Einzelinteressen dieses Vorhaben ad absurdum führt. Selbst die beiden Geheimabgeordneten des Vatikans zur Befehligung der Raum-Zeit-Maschine intrigieren gegeneinander, beide vermeintlich im Interesse des Vatikans. Letztlich zerstört sich die MYST selbst, indem sie sich führerlos in die Steinzeit versetzt – sie entzieht sich damit der Instrumentalisierung durch intrigante Individualinteressen.

3.2 Carl Amery, Der Untergang der Stadt Passau (1975)

Für diesen Roman soll eine knappe Übersicht genügen, Details sind in Koch (2014) dargestellt. Die Haupterzählung spielt im Jahr 2013 – nachdem 1981 eine Seuche fast die gesamte Menschheit hinraffte, taten sich zwei Freunde aus dem Ruhrgebiet zusammen und bauten in der Stadt Passau eine Diktatur auf. Durch die rigorose Ausbeutung des Umlandes entstand auf die Dauer ein krasser Gegensatz zwischen Stadt und Land, der letztlich im Jahr 2112 in einem Kampf entbrennt, in dem es um den Zugriff auf die Salzvorkommen im Salzburger Land geht – in dieser Region wird Salz auch als weißes Gold bezeichnet. Dieser Gegensatz schlägt sich in der Sprachverwendung nieder: Die Stadtbevölkerung spricht Standard, zum Teil Ethnolekt, zum Teil fremden Dialekt, die Landbevölkerung dagegen spricht bairischen Dialekt. Diese relativ einfache Konstellation wird noch vertieft, indem auch die graduelle Dialektausprägung, also die Verortung der Figuren im Dialektkontinuum, thematisiert wird. Dabei zeigt sich, dass Dialekt zwar diegetisch positiv, als Rückwendung zum Ursprünglichen, zur Natur, konnotiert ist, allerdings nicht in seiner rigorosen basisdialektalen Ausprägung. Diese würde Kommunikation gefährden beziehungsweise politisches Verhandeln und das Finden von Kompromissen verhindern. Beispielhaft ist hier ein junger Jäger zu nennen, der nur die Konfrontation, nicht aber den Kompromiss sucht. Im Protagonisten der Erzählung, Lois Retzer, wäre eine Verhandlungsbasis angelegt, indem er eher Regiolekt als Dialekt spricht – allerdings verkennt er dieses Potenzial. Seine Verhandlungen mit dem Scheff (standarddt. ‘Chef’) der Stadt Passau sind geprägt von sprachlicher Verstellung, er spricht ‚gestelztes Hochdeutsch‘, verbirgt damit sein eigentliches Ansinnen. Politik wird von ihm als Bluatspolitik (standarddt. ‘Blutspolitik, d.h. verfluchte Politik’) von vornherein negativ konnotiert. Erst kurz vor seinem Tod wird ihm die Notwendigkeit, ehrliche politische Verhandlungen zu führen, bewusst – dann aber ist es zu spät. Zunächst käme also ein Verhandeln mit der gegnerischen Partei einem Tabubruch gleich – ein Kompromiss wäre ein Skandal –, doch im Nachhinein wird das Versäumnis der Verhandlungsführung bedauert, der versäumte Tabubruch als eigentlicher Skandal erkannt.

3.3 Carl Amery, An den Feuern der Leyermark (1981)

In diesem Roman, der zu den Alternativwelten-Romanen zu zählen ist, wird alternativ zur tatsächlichen Historiographie ein Königreich Bayern dargestellt, das nach 1866 zum bedeutendsten Staat Mitteleuropas avanciert. Möglich ist das durch einen Waffenimport aus Amerika, sodass die Bayern im Krieg gegen Preußen 1866 durch überlegene Feuerkraft den Sieg davontragen. Wie in Der Untergang der Stadt Passau ist in An den Feuern der Leyermark durch das regionale Setting der Gebrauch des bairischen Dialekts vorgezeichnet. Doch auch hier ist Dialekt nicht nur reine Staffage, um Authentizität zu erzeugen: Zusammen mit den wiederum sehr zahlreichen Sprachspielen ergibt sich ein komplexes Inventar sprachlicher Indexe, das hier in aller Ausführlichkeit nicht dargestellt werden kann. Hingewiesen sei aber vor allem auf Namensspiele, so wie sie beispielsweise eine Hauptfigur kennzeichnen: Gottfried Schmitzke aus Thüringen emigriert nach Amerika und erfindet dort seine Godfrey rifle, die später zum Sieg der Bayern führen wird:

RM: Natürlich war der Name Schmitzke in Amerika unaussprechbar; er hieß, hintereinander, Shmithkey, Shmitesky, Dutch Loony –
NF: – also »der deutsche Verrückte«
RM: – ganz recht, und schließlich Dutch Godfrey. Solche philologischen Permuta­tionen waren absolut üblich. [...] (FdL 13)

Wiederum lässt sich eine Begründung aus der Textwelt finden: Die historische Quellenlage zu Schmitzke ist spärlich, die zu seinem Tod geradezu nebulös, so dass Historizität und Legendenbildung ineinandergreifen – zwar ist eine Denkmalkommission bestrebt, die ‚reale Person‘ des Schmitzke historisch exakt zu erfassen, diegetisch ist das aber ebenso wenig möglich wie die Gestalt des Namens auf eine einzige Variante zu reduzieren (vgl. auch Godfreid Shmeetsky, FdL 24). Bereits zu Beginn des Romans wird damit schon deutlich, dass Amery in diesem Werk die alternative Geschichtsschreibung als zentrales Thema ausgestaltet.

Den gesamten Roman durchzieht latenter Dialekt in regionalisierter Form, zum Teil aber wird auch nordbairischer Basisdialekt aus der Oberpfalz verwendet – dies dient der Figurenprofilierung, das Natürliche (Erdmännchen), das Unverfälschte und das Ehrliche kommen dadurch beispielsweise zum Ausdruck, etwa in der Figur der Therese (dTeres) Schwartz. Ihr Liebhaber Sergius Brädl dagegen, aus besitzlosen Verhältnissen, wechselt mit dem Eintritt in die Königliche Armee und dem Überstreifen der blauen Regimentsuniform vom Basisdialekt in ein leichteres, ein Münchnerisches Bairisch (FdL 49-50). Damit ist aber auch eine Wesenswandlung verbunden, er glaubt nun, über Therese nach seinem Willen verfügen zu können. Dies blockt Therese ab, mit basisdialektaler Rede. Auch an späterer Stelle im Roman dient dialektales Sprechen der Therese der Wahrheitsfindung: Sie notiert die tatsächlichen Umstände des Todes von Salomon H. Clay mit mundartlich modifizierter Schreibung (FdL 278).

Die Sprache der Juristen, die die amerikanischen Soldaten anwerben, ist durchsetzt von französischen Ausdrücken, die zum Teil eingedeutscht verschriftet werden: Courage – <Kurasch>, genial – <schehnial> (FdL 25, 33). Des Englischen sind diese Juristen nicht beziehungsweise kaum mächtig, wie sich insbesondre am Missverständnis um das Lexem rifle zeigt: Sie glauben, sie hätten 560 Gewehre geordert, tatsächlich aber handelt es sich um 560 berittene Schützen mit Gewehren (FdL 33). Da amerikanische Gunmen für die Schlacht angeheuert werden, kommt es in diesem Roman zu zahlreichen Sprachkontaktsituationen und Kulturkonflikten.

Weitere Namensspiele zeigen, dass es sich jeweils um vielschichtige Charaktere handelt, nicht um Klischee-Figuren: Der augenscheinlichen Schwarz-Weiß-Zeichnung, die sich in der Figur des Schwarzen Salomon H. Clay ikonisch verdichtet, steht die Perspektivierung unterschiedlichster Facetten der Figuren gegenüber, die durch Namensmodifikationen umgesetzt werden, wie sie eingangs auch für Gottfried Schmitzke angeführt werden. Auch der Roman weist unterschiedliche Perspektivierungen auf, wie bereits das erste Kapitel (Dokument 1) zeigt, in dem der ‚historische‘ Hergang der Tötung Godfreys (Godfrey’s Gunshop, FdL 8-9) detailliert zu ergründen versucht wird, oder im Kapitel Komm, süßer Feuerwagen (FdL 253-279), als die Tötung Salomons durch Augenzeugenberichte rekonstruiert wird. Wie bei Schmitzke wird auch der Name Salomons modifiziert, er wird in den Formen Slommon und Schlomann (FdL 275) von Therese verwendet, in den Formen Salomon H. Clay, Salomon Horatius Clay oder auch einfach nur S. Clay oder Clay (FdL 276, 278, 259) vom mit einer Untersuchung beauftragten Klerus. Der Text legt zu Beginn des Kapitels den ‚eigentlichen‘ Namen vor, doch auch hier wird schon ein nicht offizieller Rufname (Salomon) sowie ein darauf aufbauender Beiname gesetzt: Die strafrechtliche Seite des Todes des Salomon. Horatius Clay, genannt »Shlomon the King« (FdL 253; vgl. dazu Shlomon der König, FdL 8).

Besonders der Name des Free-Riders Patrick Hallahan wird onomastisch vielfältig variiert – dass er eine besondere Rolle einnimmt, wird schon durch die Eigenart seiner Erscheinung offensichtlich: Er reitet auf einem Maultier und hat nur ein Bein. Bereits im ersten Kapitel wird sein Name zusammen mit dem Spitznamen Pegleg (FdL 8, vgl. auch 82, engl. für ‘Holzbein’) eingeführt, in Anspielung auf seine Versehrtheit. Die Vielfalt der Schreibungen resultiert aus einer unkonventionellen Verschriftung einer bairisch-englischen Aussprache sowohl des Spitz- als auch des (verkürzten) Rufnamens (jeweils nur Erstnennung): Der Begleck. Der Bätt (FdL 179), Beglek, Bätti (FdL 180), Pätt (FdL 184), Patrick, Bättrick (FdL 191), Batrick (FdL 192), Pat (FdL 333). Diese Verschmelzungen des Namens spiegeln die Anpassungsfähigkeit des Iren wider, der später die urbayrische Kall heiratet (FdL 333) und damit die irisch-amerikanisch-bairische Symbiose besiegelt. Auch Kreativität wird durch diese Namensabwandlungen symbolisiert – Pegleg erfindet den Heuwender und begründet später mit Sergius die Firma Hallahan & Brädl (FdL 333).

Andere Figuren dagegen werden nicht durch Namensvariationen bedacht, etwa König Radwig III, er ist nur ein Schwärmer, der sich völlig seiner Wunschwelt verschrieben hat. Oder der Premier Zonio Zannantonio, der nur zwei Lektionen anzuwenden weiß: Erstens: Offensivgeist lohnt sich. Zweitens: die Herde gehorcht der Autorität. (FdL 319; 322). Als nicht ernstzunehmende Figur wird dem Premier Zannantonio allerdings in Regierungskreisen der Spitzname Larifari (FdL 301, ‘Kasperl’; Zehetner 2005: 224) gegeben. Oder der H. H. Dekan Ostermeyer, der sich in seiner intoleranten Haltung Salomon gegenüber auf eine starre kirchenrechtliche Position zurückzieht (FdL 254-256).

Die mit schillernden Namensgebungen versehenen Figuren zeigen ihre charakterliche Vielfalt durch unterschiedliche Perspektivierungen, ebenso wie die Betrachtung der historischen Ereignisse von verschiedenen Quellen aus zu unterschiedlichen Geschichtsrekonstruktionen führt. Die Alternative als zentrales Motiv des Romans bleibt gerade durch die Namensspiele auf subsidiärer Ebene permanent präsent.

4. Bairisch im Science-Fiction-Film

4.1 Xaver und sein außerirdischer Freund (Deutschland, 1985)

Werner Possardt drehte 1985 eine Mischung aus Heimat- und Science-Fiction-Film, inspiriert von Steven Spielbergs E.T. Bedingt durch die ländliche Situierung ist Dialekt die primäre Kommunikationsvarietät. Die Laienschauspieler stammten aus den verschiedensten Orten und mussten zuletzt mit einem einheitlicheren Bairisch synchronisiert werden (DVD Xaver: Interview mit W. Possardt, Min. 7:20-7:39). In diesem Film wechseln gemäßigtere Szenen mit sehr dialektalen; die Honoratioren des Dorfes wie Bürgermeister und Pfarrer (vgl. zum Beispiel Min. 33:20-33:30) sprechen reduzierteren Dialekt. Beim Verhör des Xaver, der der Brandstiftung verdächtigt wird, spricht der Polizist zunächst dialektal, dann der offiziellen Situation entsprechend weitgehend Standard, um dann eindringlicher wieder dialektal auf Xaver einzureden:

 

Polizist: Jetz hoit di zruck, Greinabaua [Ziehvater des Xaver, GK].
(standarddt. ‘Jetzt halt dich zurück, Greinerbauer.’)
Das ist ein Verhör, hochgradrig [sic] dienstlich. Xaver, gestern ist in Schweinau die Discothek abgebrannt und wir haben in Erfahrung gebracht, dass du domit was zu tun haben könntest.
Oiso mi dad schon interessiern, wos du in dera Discodek bei de Rauschgiftbriada zu suacha host. (DVD Xaver, Min. 13:30-13:40)
(standarddt. ‘Also mich würde schon interessieren, was du in dieser Discothek bei den Rauschgiftbrüdern zu suchen hast.’)

Kleiner (2013: 438) weist diese Erscheinung durch Variablenanalyse an verschiedenen Filmproduktionen mit bairischer Sprachbeteiligung nach. Situationsspezifische Sprechweisen werden durch diese Methode zwar nivelliert, da größere Textmengen benötigt werden, die nicht nach situativer Sprechlage differenziert werden, doch zeigt ein standardnäherer beziehungsweise dialektnäherer Quotient eine soziale Zuordnung nach Funktion beziehungsweise Stellung im Dorfleben an und trägt somit zur sprachlichen Glaubwürdigkeit bei.

Die Hauptfigur Xaver ist ein Außenseiter der dörflichen Gemeinschaft, er gilt als zurückgeblieben, was vor allem in der Aussage seines Ziehvaters dem Dorfpfarrer gegenüber Ausdruck findet: Dea Bua is a Depp, medizinisch gseng, und gheat in a Heim (Min. 33:30, standarddt. ‘Der Bub ist ein Depp, medizinisch gesehen, und gehört in ein Heim’). Xaver findet in dem zufällig an diesem Ort ‚gestrandeten‘ Außerirdischen – sein Flugobjekt hat Motorschaden – einen Freund. Er nennt ihn Alois, und die Kommunikation mit ihm gelingt weitgehend auf Grundlage einiger weniger Wörter: Das erste ‚Wort‘, das der Außerirdische lernt, ist die Phrase bluadige Hehnerkrepf (standarddt. ‘blutige Hühnerkröpfe’), die Xaver häufig als Fluch verwendet. Einige weitere Wörter und Phrasen kommen hinzu: sauber, genau, sowieso, wia dSau (standarddt. ‘wie die Sau’ = ‘super’, keine Probleme, mei Maschin is hi (standarddt. ‘meine Maschine, d.h. Fahrzeug, ist kaputt’). Bei den meisten dieser Wortschatzeinheiten handelt es sich um Diskurspartikeln, die der Regisseur aus realen Stammtischkonversationen extrahiert hat. Diese Partikeln, die wahllos in jeden Kontext eingebracht werden können, erlauben eine Akzeptanz des Außerirdischen durch die anderen Dorfbewohner.

Der Film will zweifellos primär unterhalten: Das ungezwungene mundartliche Sprechen passt zur ländlichen Situierung der Ereignisse und stützt damit die Authentizität, wie dies in der Regel bei allen dialektalen Produktionen der Fall ist. Zudem aber unterstreicht die besondere Form des dialektalen Ausdrucks in seiner Einfachheit einerseits die Naivität und Einfalt des Xaver, passt aber zum anderen auch, durch die Derbheit des Vokabulars, zu den Grobheiten der Dorfbevölkerung. Außerdem thematisiert der Regisseur, neben der sozialen Rollenverteilungen auf dem Lande, auch Sprache an sich, demonstriert am Beispiel des bairischen Dialekts ihre Leistungsfähigkeit im Aufbrechen von Kommunikationsbarrieren: Einfache Wörter überbrücken die Isolation zweier Figuren und stiften eine soziale Verbundenheit, eine Freundschaft. Die sprachlichen Versatzstücke, die Alois aufschnappt, werden im Abspann des Films zu einem Schlusslied (Hans Jürgen Buchner, Haindling) zusammengefügt und ergeben somit am Ende einen kohärenten Text.

4.2 „Zombies from outer Space“ (Deutschland 2012)

Diese aktuelle, niederbayerische Produktion aus dem Jahr 2012 ist in ihrer Verbindung aus Heimatfilm, Science-Fiction und Horrorfilm keineswegs als reine Parodie zu verstehen, sondern auch als Hommage an berühmte Produktionen – zu nennen ist in erster Linie das im Titel anklingende Werk Plan 9 from Outer Space (USA 1959), eine Zombie-Science-Fiction von Edward D. Wood jr., die wegen ihrer billigen Machart zwar zum schlechtesten Film aller Zeiten gekürt wurde, mittlerweile aber, wohl auch aufgrund dieses Votums, durchaus Kultstatus genießt.

In diesem Zusammenhang muss auf das B-Movie kurz eingegangen werden: Die Bezeichnung B-Movie bezieht sich auf das Doppelprogramm (double-bill) des US-amerikanischen Fernsehens der 1930er und 1940er Jahre; das A-Picture wurde mit großem finanziellen Aufwand produziert und zuerst gezeigt (Brockhaus 2005: Bd. 1, 222), während das B-Picture, oft nur von geringer Spielzeit, danach ausgestrahlt wurde: Die Siglen A und B sind zunächst nur auf die Reihenfolge zu beziehen. Das B-Picture wurde „oft für ein kleinstmögl. Budget im Studio ohne erstrangige Besetzung, Ausstattung, Regie (als Bestandteil einer Serie) gedreht“ (Brockhaus 2005: Bd. 1, 717). Die Bezeichnung verselbstständigte sich und wird nunmehr für minderwertige Produktionen verwendet. Ursprünglich war die Qualität nicht unbedingt minderwertig. Daneben etablierte sich die Bezeichnung Low-Budget-Produktion für Filme mit geringem finanziellem und technischem Aufwand (Brockhaus 2005: Bd. 6, 3736), zum einen als Abgrenzung zu den großen Studio-Produktionen, zum anderen kann es sich dabei um inhaltlich sehr anspruchsvolle Filme handeln. Zu diesen Produktionen wäre der Film Xaver zu rechnen, aber auch „Zombies from outer space“, denn eine Parodie auf B-Movies darf nicht mit einem B-Movie verwechselt werden – allerdings sollte über solche Zuordnungen die Filmwissenschaft entscheiden.

Kurz zum Plot der Geschichte: In der ländlichen Idylle Niederbayerns, 1950er-Jahre, entpuppen sich die mysteriösen Kornkreise als Gräber von Außerirdischen, die als Zombies erneut zum Leben erwachen, um den Planeten als neuen Lebensraum zu gewinnen; die Dorfbevölkerung wird bedroht und zum Teil getötet, doch zuletzt können die Aliens ganz trivial durch Auspuffabgase und Rauch vernichtet werden – eine Anspielung auf den bekannten Film Mars Attacks! (USA 1996), dort werden die Außerirdischen durch Schlagermusik eliminiert.

Die Varietätenverteilung im Film ist grundsätzlich der Authentizität des lokalen Settings geschuldet: Die Landbevölkerung spricht durchweg Dialekt. Bei der Auswahl der Schauspieler wurde deshalb auf weitgehend homogene Dialektkompetenz und -provenienz geachtet. Ein geringfügiges Abweichen aufgrund unterschiedlicher Herkunftsorte der Schauspieler spielt eine untergeordnete Rolle, wichtig war dem Regisseur eine möglichst basisdialektale Redeweise (DVD „Zombies from outer Space“: Extras, Making ofVorproduktion, Min. 4:10-5:05). Eine soziale Stratifikation ist durch die dem Standard angenäherten Varietäten von Polizist und Pfarrer erkennbar. Die Soldaten der nahegelegenen amerikanischen Militärbasis sprechen Englisch und akzentuiertes Deutsch, das sporadisch mit englischen Vokabeln durchsetzt ist. Phonetisch auffällig ist vor allem die Artikulation des Phonems /r/, das durchweg als retroflexer Approximant [ɻ] realisiert wird. Sprecherabhängig kann zudem der palatale beziehungsweise velare Frikativ [ç] / [x] durch den Plosiv [k] substituiert, oder das gespannte [eː] als Diphthong [ɛɪ̯] ausgesprochen werden. Oberflächlich wirkt das recht authentisch, doch ist diese Form der Sprachmischung kaum mit tatsächlichen Transferenzerscheinungen vergleichbar: Der Soldat Private Jimmy Anderson, der von der Protagonistin Maria Obst kauft, verwendet grammatikalisch korrektes Deutsch, fügt aber trotzdem sehr einfache englische Vokabeln wie soldiers, break oder apples in den Redefluss ein:

J. Anderson: Ich hab dich jetzt gar nicht erkannt.
[ɪk hap dɪk jɛʦ̮ gaɻ nɪçt ɛɐ̯ˈkant]
Die soldiers können nicht den ganzen Tag Pause machen.
[diː ˈzou̯lʤ̮ɐɻs ˈkœnənɪk deːn ˈgantn̩ taːk ˈpauzə ˈmakən]
Meine break is schon lange vorbei.
[ˈmai̯ne ˈbɻɛɪ̯k ɪs ʃon ˈlaŋə fɔɻˈbai̯]
Ich kauf dir was ab. (Let’s see what you have.)
[ɪk˺kau̯f diɻ vas ˀap]
Kannst du mir bitte ein von den apples geben und den Brezel.
[ˈkanst duː miɻ ˈbɪdə ˀai̯n fɔn diː ˈˀɛpl̩s ˈgɛɪ̯bən ʊnth deːn ˈbɻɛɪ̯ʦ̮l̩]
(Ausschnitte aus „Zombies from outer Space“, Min. 9:30-10:32)

Nur sehr selten werden auch grammatische Fehler eingebaut, wie etwa das falsche Genus (Maskulinum anstatt Femininum) von Brezel im letzten Beispielsatz. Da es sich bei diesem Film – vom inhaltlichen Anspruch her gesehen – nicht nur um ein B-Movie handelt, sondern mit dieser Produktion auch explizit das B-Movie-Niveau prototypisch erreicht werden soll, fügt sich diese Inkonsequenz gut in das Gesamtbild ein. Eine Parallele findet das englisch akzentuierte Deutsch in der englischen Aussprache des Wissenschaftlers Professor Stock gegen Ende des Films: Er substituiert das [θ] beziehungsweise [ð] durch das stimmlose [s] und das retroflexe [ɻ] durch die standarddeutsche Artikulation der /r/-Allophone (die konsonantische Form des /r/ wird apikal gesprochen):

Prof. Stock: No, thank you, that will be all.
[ˈnɔ ˈsaŋk juː ˈsat ˈvɪl biː ˈɔːl]
For sure I will.
[fɔɐ̯ ˈʃuːr ai̯ ˈvɪl]
(Ausschnitte aus „Zombies from outer Space“, Min. 1:27:40-1:27:47)

Eine weitere Inkonsequenz findet sich im Sprachgebrauch der Protagonistin: Maria spricht, obwohl sie in dem Dorf aufgewachsen ist, Standarddeutsch. Sie ist zwar ein Waisenkind (nebenbei bemerkt: eine Parallele zu Xaver, auch hier ist der Protagonist eine Waise; DVD Xaver: Min. 12:10-12:30), aber bei Pflegeeltern im Dorf groß geworden. Erst gegen Ende des Films zeigt sich, dass Maria aus einer Verbindung eines Menschen mit einem Außerirdischen hervorgegangen ist. Ihre sprachliche Andersartigkeit nimmt ihren Sonderstatus vorweg, der auch von einer anderen Dorfbewohnerin zu Beginn des Films explizit thematisiert wird: A weng komisch bist ja scho, gell? (Min. 6:08, standarddt. ‘Ein wenig komisch bist du ja schon, nicht wahr?’). Weshalb sie aber nicht dialektal sozialisiert wurde – ein anderes Sozialisations­angebot gab es in dieser dörflichen Gemeinschaft der 50er Jahre nicht –, bleibt eine unlogische semantische Leerstelle im Film. Auch darin ist der Anspruch zu erkennen, gewollt ein B-Movie zu produzieren: Vordergründige Plausibilitäten bleiben letztlich rational unbegründet. Allerdings sprechen auch noch zwei weitere Figuren des Films Standardsprache: Professor Josef Stock, der mit den Außerirdischen heimlich kollaboriert und um die Abkunft Marias Bescheid weiß, und, mit elektronisch verzerrter Stimme, das Ober-Alien. Die Symptome Marias, mit den Außerirdischen genetisch in Verbindung zu stehen, resultieren diegetisch explizit aus einem Bluttest und dem Hustenreiz auf Abgase, implizit aus der Verwendung der Standardvarietät – die sprachliche Zusammengehörigkeit muss der Rezipient selbst erkennen. Die Verwendung verschiedener sprachlicher Varietäten ist in diesem Film wohl durchdacht und erfüllt nicht nur ihren Zweck als offenkundig stereotypisierender Index auf Lokalität (Dorfbewohner, mit geringfügiger sozialer Differenzierung) und Nationalität (amerikanische Besatzungstruppen in Deutschland, nach Amerika emigrierter deutscher Wissenschaftler), sondern zugleich als versteckter Index auf die Zugehörigkeit Marias zu den Außerirdischen.

5. Fazit

Anliegen dieser Ausführungen war es, zu zeigen, dass dialektale Sprachverwendung in medialen Produktionen keineswegs nur an Authentizität und plakative Rollenverteilung geknüpft sein muss. Auch eine Differenzierung in ‚informationell bedeutsam‘, gleichzusetzen mit Standardsprache, und ‚informationell unbedeutsam‘, gleichzusetzen mit Dialekt, wie sie Riemann für das Medienbairische der jüngeren Produktionen ab 2001 annimmt, muss nicht unbedingt gegeben sein (Riemann 2009: 274-277; Kleiner 2013: 430). Das ‚Medienbairische‘ besteht nach Riemann aus einer Mischung von „synthetisch oberbayerische[m] Dialekt mit hochdeutschen Versatzstücken“ (Riemann 2009: 274). Neben der Informationsselektion kommt dieser Sprachmischung auch eine größere kommunikative Reichweite zugute (Riemann 2009: 276). Gegen die Funktion der Informationsselektion wendet sich Kleiner (2013), der für den Film Die Scheinheiligen (2001) feststellt, dass „das Medienbairischkonzept Riemanns für diesen Film nicht tragfähig ist“ (Kleiner 2013: 438) und auch nicht zu den neueren Produktionen der Serie Dahoam is dahoam (Folgen 503 und 504) passt (Kleiner 2013: 447); Riemann dagegen analysierte die ersten 25 Folgen aus dem Jahr 2007 (Riemann 2009: 283-284), später erhielten die Schauspieler eine Dialektberatung, so dass das Dialektalitätsniveau insgesamt gesteigert werden konnte (Kleiner 2013: 447).

Gerade die Science-Fiction als Experimentierfeld eröffnet dem Dialekt neue Funktionalisierungen, die sich nahtlos in die Interpretation der Romane und Filmproduktionen einfügen. Dabei ist Dialektinszenierung, wie alle untersuchten Beispiele zeigten, nur eine unter mehreren sprachlichen Spielformen. Insbesondere das Spiel mit Namen und graphische Variationen sind in den Romanen Carl Amerys neben Varietätenspektren und Sprachmischungen probates Mittel, um Metasymbolisierungen vorzunehmen. Neben der primären Funktion der Authentitätssicherung, die grundsätzlich immer anzunehmen ist, treten aber im Experimentierfeld der Science-Fiction zahlreiche weitere Möglichkeiten zutage: In Das Königsprojekt symbolisiert die Varietätenvielfalt die Splitterung der Sozietät und damit die Unmöglichkeit einer Konfliktlösung, die vielfältigen, zumeist binären Sprachmischungen stehen für unzureichende Lösungsansätze kleiner Gruppierungen. Die Wandlungsfähigkeit des Arnold Füßli wird durch seine Namensvariation in Szene gesetzt und steht in Opposition zu dem recht einfältigen Jimmy Krauthobler, dessen unzureichende Bairisch-Gälisch-Symbiose einerseits einen kulturellen Brückenschlag andeutet, andererseits eine Identitätsstörung deutlich werden lässt – auch wenn sich die Figur in ihrer Kultursymbiose sichtlich wohl fühlt. Im Roman An den Feuern der Leyermark wird, wie bei Füßli im Königsprojekt, an der Figur des Pegleg die Vielseitigkeit des Charakters durch die Namensvariation belegt, die bis zur Unsegmentierbarkeit verschmelzenden onymischen Bestandteile englischer und bairischer Provenienz zeigen die kulturelle Assimilation der Figur an die neue Wahlheimat. Einfältige oder starre Charaktere dagegen werden durch Namensidentität ausgewiesen, so etwa der Minister Zannantonio oder Dekan Ostermeyer. Das zentrale Motiv der Alternative – bei diesem Roman handelt es sich um einen Alternativwelten-Roman – wird auf diese Weise im gesamten Text auf subsidiäre Weise indexikalisiert. Zudem steht der unverfälschte Dialekt für die Wahrheit (Therese), sprachlicher Wandel bedingt zugleich eine Veränderung des Charakters (Sergius). In Der Untergang der Stadt Passau wird Dialekt zwar auf herkömmliche Weise zur sozialen Stratifikation genutzt, dennoch wird eine zweite Funktion erkennbar: Die Suche nach einer Lingua franca, einer Sprache der politischen Verständigung, ist ein verdecktes, dennoch zentrales Motiv des Romans. Sie kann nur in einem sprachlichen Kompromiss der beiden verfeindeten Parteien gefunden werden, einer Umgangssprache, die im Dialektkontinuum zwischen den Polen Basisdialekt und Standardsprache vermitteln kann.

Die beiden Filme bleiben, zumindest was das Zeichenhafte von Sprache auf Meta-Ebene anbelangt, hinter den Romanen Carl Amerys zurück. Dennoch werden, neben der Primärfunktion der sozialen Stratifikation des Handlungsraumes, zusätzliche Symbolisierungen erkennbar: In Xaver wird das Bairische zu einer Sprache der Verständigung, zum Mittel der Integration. Die Einfalt, die dem ‚Dorfdeppen‘ Xaver per Dialektverwendung zugeschrieben wird, entspricht dabei ebenso dem gängigen Klischee eines – mit Bernstein gesprochen – restringierten Codes, wie die Derbheit des Dialekts, die Affinitäten zu den Grobheiten der Dorfbewohner aufweist. Bei „Zombies from outer space“ kann schließlich, neben einer sprachlich relativ gering ausgeprägten Sozialsymbolisierung, eine verdeckte Indexikalisierung der genetischen Zugehörigkeit der Protagonistin entdeckt werden.

Insgesamt wird, sowohl bei Roman als auch bei Film, deutlich, dass die primären Funktionen der Authentizitätssicherung und der sozialen Stratifikation vorhanden sind. Bei den Filmen wird dies zusätzlich dadurch abgesichert, dass beide explizit als Heimatfilm bezeichnet werden. Daneben werden aber auch recht spezifische, im Werk selbst zu suchende Funktionen der Varietätengestaltung wirkungsvoll umgesetzt. Diese können nur vor dem Hintergrund des Gesamttextes verstanden werden: Durch eine permanente, nicht unbedingt statische Indexikalisierung der Romanfiguren eröffnet sich eine semiotische Kodierungsebene im Sinne einer Metasymbolisierung, wie sie Roland Barthes entworfen hat (Barthes 2012: 253-280; Nöth 2000: 108). Diese Möglichkeit hat Walter M. Miller jr. meisterhaft genutzt, Carl Amery hat diese Strategie adaptiert und gekonnt in seinen eigenen Romanen angewandt. Aber auch scheinbar einfachere Produktionen, wie die beiden zuletzt besprochenen Filme, lassen eine über bloße Authentizität und plakative Rollenzuweisung hinausgehende Symbolisierungsfunktion von Sprache und ihren Varietäten erkennen.

Die exemplarisch besprochenen Werke zeigen eine beeindruckende Bandbreite spezifischer Indexikalisierungen von Varietäten und Variationen, die zu einer Metasymbolisierung führen. Herauszufinden, dass damit die Möglichkeiten noch lange nicht ausgeschöpft sind, muss weiteren Analysen vorbehalten bleiben – die Science-Fiction könnte geradezu unendliche Weiten sinnhafter Sprachvariation eröffnen.

Literatur

Barthes, Roland (2012) Mythen des Alltags, vollständige Ausgabe, übersetzt von Horst Brühmann, Berlin, Suhrkamp.

Berlinger, Josef (1983) Das zeitgenössische deutsche Dialektgedicht. Zur Theorie und Praxis der deutschsprachigen Dialektlyrik 1950-1980, Frankfurt am Main, Bern und New York, Lang.

Brockhaus (2005) Der Brockhaus in zehn Bänden, unter redaktioneller Leitung von Joachim Weiß, Leipzig und Mannheim, Brockhaus.

Dobkowitz, Cornelia (2009) „»Wer früher stirbt, ist länger tot« – Bairischer Dialekt im Kinofilm“ in Mundart und Medien. Beiträge zum 3. dialektologischen Symposium im Bayerischen Wald, Walderbach, Mai 2008, Ulrich Kanz, Alfred Wildfeuer und Ludwig Zehetner (Hrsg.), Regensburg, edition vulpes: 61-80.

Kleiner, Stefan (2013) „Medienbairisch – Eine variationslinguistische Untersuchung der Dialekttiefe des Mittelbairischen in Film- und Fernsehproduktionen“ in Strömungen in der Entwicklung der Dialekte und ihrer Erforschung. Beiträge zur 11. Bayerisch-Österreichischen Dialektologentagung in Passau, September 2010, Rüdiger Harnisch (Hrsg.), Regensburg, edition vulpes: 429-449.

Koch, Günter (2008) „German dialects as multimedialects on television“ in Dialect for all Seasons. Cultural Diversity as Tool and Directive for Dialect Researchers and Translators, Irmeli Helin (Hrsg.), Münster, Nodus: 77-96.

---- (2012) „Mythos und Realität. Die Sprachvarietäten der Protagonisten in den Filmbiographien Schiller und Margarethe Steiff“ in Wechselwirkungen II. Deutschspra­chige Literatur und Kultur im regionalen und internationalen Kontext. Beträge der internationalen Konferenz des Germanistischen Instituts der Universität Pécs vom 9. bis 11. September 2010, Zoltán Szendi (Hrsg.), Wien, Edition Praesens: 461-476.

---- (2014) „Sprachverwendung und Sprachwissen in Carl Amerys Roman Der Untergang der Stadt Passau im Vergleich mit Walter M. Millers Roman Lobgesang auf Leibowitz“ in Skandal und Tabubruch – Heile Welt und Heimat. Bilder von Bayern in Literatur, Film und anderen Künsten, Jan-Oliver Decker und Hans Krah (Hrsg.), Passau, Stutz: 183-201.

---- (2016) „Carl Amery – ökopolitischer Vordenker, Schriftsteller, Publizist“ in Ostbairische Lebensbilder, Band V, Franz-Reiner Erkens (Hrsg.), Passau, Klinger: 174-200.

Konerding, Hans-Peter (2001) „Sprache im Alltag und kognitive Linguistik: Stereotype und schematisiertes Wissen“ in Sprache im Alltag. Beiträge zu neuen Perspektiven in der Linguistik. Herbert Ernst Wiegand zum 65. Geburtstag gewidmet, Andrea Lehr, Matthias Kammerer, Klaus-Peter Konerding, Angelika Storrer, Caja Thimm und Werner Wolski (Hrsg.), Berlin und New York, de Gruyter: 151-172.

Murray, James H., Bradley, Henry, Craigie, W. A., and C. T. Onions (Hrsg.) (1989) The Oxford English Dictionary, 2. Auflage, Oxford, Clarendon Press.

Nöth, Winfried (2000) Handbuch der Semiotik, 2. Auflage, Stuttgart und Weimar, Metzler.

Riemann, Andreas (2009) „Neue ‚Sprache‘, neue ‚Heimat‘, neues ‚Bayern‘?“ in Mundart und Medien. Beiträge zum 3. dialektologischen Symposium im Bayerischen Wald, Walderbach, Mai 2008, Ulrich Kanz, Alfred Wildfeuer und Ludwig Zehetner (Hrsg.), Regensburg, edition vulpes: 273-287.

Straßner, Erich (1983) „Rolle und Ausmaß dialektalen Sprachgebrauchs in den Massenmedien und in der Werbung“ in Dialektologie. Ein Handbuch der deutschen und allgemeinen Dialektforschung, Werner Besch, Ulrich Knoop, Wolfgang Putschke und Herbert E. Wiegand (Hrsg.), Berlin und New York, de Gruyter: 1509-1525.

Strassner, Erich (1986) „Dialekt als Ware“ Zeitschrift für Dialektologie und Linguistik 53: 310-342.

Zehetner, Ludwig (1985) Das bairische Dialektbuch, unter Mitarbeit von Ludwig M. Eichinger, Reinhard Rascher, Anthony Rowley und Christopher J. Wickham, München, Beck.

---- (2005) Bairisches Deutsch. Lexikon der deutschen Sprache in Altbayern, Regensburg, edition vulpes.

Literarische Werke

Amery, Carl (1974) Das Königsprojekt, München, Piper. Zitierte Ausgabe: München, dtv 1978 [abgekürzt als KP]

Amery, Carl (1975) Der Untergang der Stadt Passau, München, Heyne. [abgekürzt als UdSP]

Amery, Carl (1979) An den Feuern der Leyermark, München, Nymphenburger 1979. Zitierte Ausgabe: München, Heyne 1981 [abgekürzt als FdL]

Dick, Philipp K. (1981) Der heimliche Rebell, übersetzt von Karl-Ulrich Burgdorf, München, Moewig. Titel der Originalausgabe: The Man Who Japed, 1956.

Miller, Walter M., jr. (1979), Lobgesang auf Leibowitz, ungekürzte Neuausgabe, übersetzt von Jürgen Saupe und Erev, München, Heyne. [abgekürzt als LaL]

Miller, Walter M., Jr. (1959), A Canticle for Leibowitz, Philadelphia, New York, Lippincott. Zitierte Ausgabe: New York, Toronto und London: Bantam Dell 2007. [abgekürzt als CfL]

Filme

Dahoam is dahoam. Daily Soap, Deutschland 2007(-2015), 1556 Folgen, Bayerischer Rundfunk.

Der Bulle von Tölz. Deutschland 1995-2009, 69 Folgen, Sat1.

Der Verdingbub. Deutschland 2013, Regie: Markus Imboden.

Die Komiker – Altbayerisch für Anfänger. Deutschland 2009, Regie: Helmut Milz.

Die Rosenheim-Cops. Deutschland 2002(-2015), 322 Folgen, ZDF.

Die Scheinheiligen. Deutschland 2001, Regie: Thomas Kronthaler.

Margarethe Steiff. Deutschland 2005, Regie: Xaver Schwarzenberger.

Mars Attacks! USA 1996, Regie: Tim Burton.

Plan 9 from outer Space. USA 1959, Regie: Edward D. Wood jr.

Stubbe – von Fall zu Fall. Deutschland 1995-2013, 50 Folgen, ZDF.

Xaver und sein außerirdischer Freund. Deutschland 1985, Regie: Werner Possardt.

„Zombies from outer Space“. Deutschland 2012, Regie: Martin Faltermeier.

Internetquellen

Wikipedia (2015), Stichwort „Katja Riemann
<de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katja_Riemann> (abgerufen am 5. August 2015)

About the author(s)

Günter Koch was born 1972 and has a PhD in German Linguistics. He studied German linguistics, literature and history at the University of Passau, Germany, and at the University of Stirling, U.K. His main research interests are dialectology and morphology, the ongoing projects deal with intonation of varieties. He is teaching German Linguistics at the University of Passau.

Email: [please login or register to view author's email address]

©inTRAlinea & Günter Koch (2019).
"Sprachliche Varietäten und Variationen in der Science-Fiction – mit Fokussierung auf das Bairische"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2459

Zur Übersetzung dialektaler Pejorative – am Beispiel des Wienerischen und des Lviver Urbanolekts

By inTRAlinea Webmaster

Abstract & Keywords

English:

This article is dedicated to the problem of translating pejorative words and phrases using the example of two linguistic varieties – the Viennese and the Lviv/Lemberg urban language (as a variety of the Ukrainian language). Four criteria are proposed that can be taken as a basis for the translation: the intensity, the morphological and lexical-semantic features, the frequency of use and the stylistics. Since many pejorativa in both urban varieties belong to the fecal-anal domain, a literal translation is often not possible. For those cases where a literal translation does not work, a number of possibilities is proposed, depending on whether they are formal, metaphorical or metonymic pejoratives, which work in the speech act of "insult", or constitute other aggressive speech acts such as curses, threats, maledictions, aggressive calls, pejorative remarks or comparisons. Translators owe the freedom of translating pejorativa to the following peculiarity of their lexical meaning: the significant aspect of meaning plays a subordinate role, while the connotative (negative-emotive) aspect of meaning is in the foreground.

German:

Der Beitrag widmet sich der Übersetzung pejorativer Wörter und Wendungen am Beispiel von zwei sprachlichen Varietäten – dem Wienerischen und dem Lviver/Lemberger Urbanolekt als sprachlicher Varietät im Ukrainischen. Es werden vier Kriterien vorgeschlagen, die der Übersetzung zugrunde gelegt werden können: die Berücksichtigung der Intensität, der morphologischen und lexikalisch-semantischen Besonderheiten, der Häufigkeit des Gebrauchs und der Stilistik. Da viele Pejorativa in den beiden Urbanolekten zum fäkal-analen Bereich gehören, ist wörtliche Übersetzung oft nicht möglich. Für die Fälle, wenn die wörtliche Übersetzung nicht funktioniert, wurde eine Reihe von Möglichkeiten vorgeschlagen je nachdem, ob es sich um formelle, metaphorische oder metonymische Pejorativa, die im Sprechakt Beschimpfung funktionieren oder um andere aggressive Sprechakte handelt: Fluch, Drohung, Verwünschung, aggressive Aufforderung, abwertende Bemerkung oder Vergleich. Die Freiheit beim Übersetzen von Pejorativa verdanken Übersetzerinnen und Übersetzer der Besonderheit lexikalischer Bedeutung pejorativer Lexik, dass der signifikative Bedeutungsaspekt eine unterordnete Rolle spielt, während der konnotative (negativ-emotive) Bedeutungsaspekt im Vordergrund steht.

Keywords: Urbanolekte, Pejorativa, metaphorische, formale, aggressive Sprechakte, urbanolects, metaphorical, formal, aggressive speech acts

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"Zur Übersetzung dialektaler Pejorative – am Beispiel des Wienerischen und des Lviver Urbanolekts"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2458

1. Einleitung

Die Übersetzung bedarf wie jede andere kreative Tätigkeit der Feststellung von Gesetzmäßigkeiten und ihrer theoretischen Untermauerung. Der Schwerpunkt dieses Beitrags wird auf praktische Erfahrungen der Autorin, deren langjährigen Forschungsgegenstand Pejorativa im Deutschen und Ukrainischen darstellen, beim Zusammenstellen des Deutsch-Ukrainischen Schimpfwörterbuchs (Havryliv 2005) gelegt. Die im Laufe dieser Arbeit gewonnenen Herangehensweisen werden mit den morphologischen, strukturell-semantischen und syntaktischen Besonderheiten nicht nur der Pejorativa in der Rolle von Schimpfwörtern, sondern auch der komplexen aggressiven Sprechakte verknüpft.

Bei der Übersetzung dialektaler Pejorativa stehen wir vor der doppelten Schwierigkeit, denn abgesehen von Schwierigkeiten beim Übersetzen aus einem Dialekt haben wir es mit Wörtern und Wendungen zu tun, die durch intensive nationale Spezifik (kulturelle Tabus, Wertesysteme und stereotype Vorstellungen der Ursprungssprache) geprägt sind und deshalb als unübersetzbares Sprachgut bezeichnet werden (Mokienko und Walter 1999). Diese Besonderheiten der pejorativen Lexik erschweren auch die Erstellung eines zweisprachigen Schimpfwörterbuchs, denn die Suche nach einem Äquivalet unterscheidet sich von den Parametern der klassischen Lexikographie. Es ist deshalb verständlich, dass es nur wenige zweisprachige Schimpfwörterbücher gibt und dass diese unvollkommen sind. Im Falle des Deutsch-Ukrainischen Schimpfwörterbuchs stand die Autorin vor einer doppelten Herausforderung, denn zu dem Zeitpunkt existierte noch kein einziges Wörterbuch ukrainischer Pejorativa, während im deutschsprachigen Raum damals über hundert Schimpfwörterbücher existierten. Allein die Bibliographie des Großen deutschen Schimpfwörterbuchs (1996) zählt 123 Schimpfwörterbücher, die jedoch vorwiegend auf Unterhaltung ausgerichtet sind. Das Deutsch-Ukrainische Schimpfwörterbuch ist somit nicht nur das erste zweisprachige, deutsch-ukrainische Schimpfwörterbuch, sondern gleichzeitig die erste Sammlung ukrainischer Pejorativa überhaupt.

Am Anfang wurden zwei Kartotheken pejorativer Lexik, jeweils auf Deutsch und auf Ukrainisch, zusammengestellt. Deutsche Pejorativa wurden dem Großen Deutschen Schimpfwörterbuch (1996) entnommen, die ukrainischen Pejorativa kamen aus ukrainischen literarischen Texten und Wörterbüchern wie zum Beispiel dem Synonymwörterbuch von Karavans’kyy (2000) oder dem Jargonwörterbuch von Stavyc’ka (2003). Innerhalb jeder Kartothek wurden die Pejorativa in synonymische Reihen gegliedert, innerhalb welcher unter Berücksichtigung einer Reihe von Kriterien wie Intensität, morphologische und semantische Aspekte, Frequentivität und Stilistik nach den Äquivalenten in beiden Sprachen gesucht wurde. Das Deutsch-Ukrainische Schimpfwörterbuch beinhaltet neben den Schimpfwörtern auch pejorative Adjektive und Adverbien, die im Sprechakt Beschimpfung verwendet werden können. In diesem Beitrag werden neben dem Sprechakt Beschimpfung auch andere aggressive Sprechakte behandelt. Die empirische Grundlage bilden mündliche und schriftliche Befragungen von Wienerinnen und Wienern (610 Personen), die im Rahmen von zwei Projekten des österreichischen Fonds zur Förderung der wissenschaftlichen Forschung (FWF; 2006 bis 2008/Lise Meitner-Programm und 2012 bis 2017/Elise Richter-Programm) durchgeführt wurden. Die ukrainischen Äquivalente sind von der Autorin als Sprecherin des Lviver Urbanolekts konstruierte Beispiele oder wurden dem Lviver Lexikon (Khobzey et al. 2012) entnommen.

2. Dialekt und Emotionalität

Die Funktionsbereiche der Dialekte sind heute in erster Linie der landwirtschaftlich-handwerkliche und der häuslich-private, vgl. Löffler (2005: 145), Nabrings (1981: 67) und Wesche (1963: 368). Deshalb lässt sich in allen Dialekten ein ähnliches Bild beobachten: Eine differenzierte Lexik findet sich in den Bereichen des täglichen Lebens wie Kulinarik, Handwerk, regionales Obst und Gemüse, einheimische Tiere, Gegenstände des Alltags (Möbel, Geschirr, Kleidung usw.), psychische und physische Abweichungen, das Verhalten/der Charakter und das Aussehen der Mitmenschen. Der eingeschränkte Wortschatz des Dialekts bei den Abstrakta, Generalia und Kollektiva gleicht sich durch „eine größere Wortbreite im Bereich der sinnlichen Wahrnehmung, der Gefühle und der konkreten Welt“ (Löffler 2005: 457) aus.

Peter Wehle, ein österreichischer Kabarettist und Autor populärwissenschaftlicher Bücher über das Wienerische, stellt den „bunten Dialekt“ der „schwarz-weißen Hochsprache“ gegenüber und bezeichnet ihn als „das beste Transportmittel für unsere Emotionalität“ (1980: 286-287). Diese Ansicht wird auch von Sprachwissenschaftlerinnen und Sprachwissenschaftler wie Gernetz (1964: 259), Löffler (1980: 7) und Nabrings (1981: 67) bestätigt. Wie alle Dialekte, sind auch das Wienerische und der Lviver Urbanolekt eine unerschöpfliche „Schatztruhe“, was Schimpfwörter, Flüche und andere Wörter und Wendungen zur Äußerung negativer Emotionen betrifft. Allein zur Bezeichnungen von negativen Emotionen habe ich in Wörterbüchern des Wienerischen (Daniel 2006, Jontes 1987, Mayr 1980, Wehle 1980, Weihs 2000, Wintersberger 1995) 19 Lexeme mit der Bedeutung ‘zornig, wütend sein’ und 9 Lexeme mit der Bedeutung ‘Ärger, Wut’ gezählt. 15 Lexeme haben im Wienerischen die Bedeutung ‘schimpfen, streiten’. Diese Vielfalt bietet die Möglichkeiten, je nach der Besonderheit des Schimpfens zu unterscheiden: zum Beispiel keppeln ‘fortwährend schimpfen’, mugerzen ‘leise schimpfen’ oder motschgern ‘vor sich hin schimpfen’. Der Dialekt ist für die SprachträgerInnen näher als die Hochsprache, ist für sie ihr „sprachliches Zuhause“ (Wehle 1980: 286), folgend eignet er sich ideal zur Äußerung von Emotionen: Ergebnisse der von mir durchgeführten schriftlichen und mündlichen Befragungen von Wienerinnen und Wienern zeigen, dass vorwiegend im Dialekt geschimpft wird. Diese Tatsache spiegelt sich in der Lexikographie wider: Dialektwörterbücher bieten ein reiches Material für Schimpfwortforscher, und umgekehrt beruhen Schimpfwörterbücher oft auf einzelnen Dialekten.

3. Gemeinsame Kennzeichen beider Urbanolekte

Ein Umstand, der in vielen Fällen die wörtliche Übersetzung vom Wienerischen in den Lviver Urbanolekt ermöglicht, ist die Zugehörigkeit beider sprachlichen Varietäten im Bereich der Pejorativität zur fäkal-analen Sphäre (vgl. dazu auch Stavyc’ka 2008: 34): Leck mi am Oasch – поцілуй мене в дупу, Geh in Oasch – йди до дупи, G‘schissena – гімнюк, гімнючка, Scheißer – засранець, Oaschlecker – срако(дупо)лиз. Dagegen ist wörtliche Übersetzung in Sprachen (Dialekten), die wie das Englische, Russische oder Serbischen im pejorativen Bereich zur Sex-Schimpfkultur gehören, problematischer, da in diesen Fällen der semantische  Bereich gewechselt werden und die deutschen Ausdrücke, die der fäkalen Sphäre angehören, mit den Wörtern und Wendungen aus dem sexuellen Bereich übersetzt werden sollten wie zum Beispiel Leck mi am Oasch ins Russische mit Пошел на хуй wörtlich ‘Geh auf den Schwanz’. Eine wörtliche Übersetzung wäre zwar auch möglich (Иди в жопу/задницу), doch in diesem Fall würde ein wichtiges Kriterium für die Übersetzung von Pejorativa missachtet: die Übereinstimmung der Häufigkeit des Gebrauchs.

Ebenfalls sind beide sprachlichen Varietäten von der Schmelztiegelfunktion gekennzeichnet – zum Beispiel gibt es im Lviver Urbanolekt viele Germanismen, in beiden sprachlichen Varietäten treffen wir pejorative Wörter und Wendungen aus dem Jiddischen: meschugge мішіґіний; Alle Zähne sollen dir ausfallen bis auf einen – fürs Zahnweh! – Щоб тобі всі зуби повипадали, а один лишився і болів!

Das aus dem Jiddischen entlehnte Lexem cикса (jiddisch schickse ‘Christenmädchen, Dienstmädchen’) wird in Galizien abwertend für ein blutjunges Mädchen gebraucht. Bei der deutschen Entlehnung vollzog sich auch ebenfalls eine Bedeutungsverschlechterung – das Lexem Schickse bedeutet heute ‘liederliche Frau’. Eine entgegengesetzte Entwicklung (Bedeutungsverbesserung) hat auf seinem Weg aus dem Deutschen in den Lviver Urbanolekt das Lexem гунцвут (‘Hundsfut’) durchgemacht: Es ist eine kosende beziehungsweise ambivalente Bezeichnung für ein lebhaftes Kind.

Bei der Übernahme von Germanismen in die galizische Sprachvariante erfolgt ihre Anpassung an das graphische, lautliche und grammatische System des Ukrainischen. Graphische Anpassung äußert sich dadurch, dass die Wörter in kyrillischer Schrift wiedergegeben werden. Als Folge lautlicher Anpassung werden im Ukrainischen untypische Laute durch im Ukrainischen typische ersetzt. Als Folge grammatischer Anpassung verändert sich in manchen Fällen das Genus, Adjektive bekommen ukrainische adjektivische Suffixe, Verben folgen den Regeln der ukrainischen Konjugation (zu den Germanismen im Lviver Urbanolekt vgl. Havryliv 2008).

3. Aggressive Sprechakte

Im Anschluss an Searle (1991: 221), der diejenigen Sprechakte als expressiv bezeichnet, welche Gefühle und Einstellungen der sprechenden Person zum Ausdruck bringen, definiere ich Sprechakte, mit denen wir unsere negativen Gefühle ausdrücken, als aggressive Sprechakte und zähle dazu folgende: Beschimpfung, beleidigender Vergleich beziehungsweise beleidigende Bemerkung, Fluch, Verwünschung, Drohung, aggressive Aufforderung.

Im Weiteren wird jeder von diesen Sprechakten unter dem Blickwinkel der Übersetzung pejorativer Ausdrücke vom Wienerischen in den Lviver Urbanolekt behandelt.

3.1. Sprechakt Beschimpfung

Dass das Schimpfwörtervokabular als unübersetzbares Sprachgut bezeichnet wird, mag stimmen, wenn wir versuchen würden, Pejorativa wörtlich in eine andere Sprache zu übersetzen: Das gebräuchliche deutsche Pejorativum Arschloch würde, wörtlich ins Ukrainische (oder in andere Sprachen) übertragen, nichts weiter als einen anatomischen Vulgarismus darstellen. Es muss deshalb bei der Übersetzung von pejorativen Lexemen in erster Linie die Tatsache berücksichtigt werden, dass ihre begriffliche Bedeutung eine zweitrangige Rolle spielt und die emotive Bedeutung über den begrifflichen Inhalt dominiert.

Infolge der im Laufe meiner Arbeit am Deutsch-Ukrainischen Schimpfwörterbuch (2005) gewonnenen Erkenntnisse halte ich es für sinnvoll, der Suche nach dem entsprechenden Äquivalent für ein pejoratives Lexem in einer anderen Sprache folgende vier Hauptkriterien zugrunde zu legen (vgl. Havryliv 2009: 165-170):

  • Die Intensität pejorativer Lexeme sollte, obwohl sie in erster Linie vom situativen Kontext und von individuellen Wahrnehmungen geprägt wird, in beiden Sprachen übereinstimmen. Die Stärke des Pejorativums ist auch mit seiner Etymologie verbunden – in der Regel gehören die stärksten Pejorativa in beiden Urbanolekten, sowohl dem Wiener als auch dem Lviver, zum fäkal-analen und zum sexuellen Bereich.
  • Morphologische und lexikalisch-semantische Aspekte sind zu berücksichtigen. Nach Möglichkeit sollten metaphorische Pejorativa auch mit metaphorischen pejorativen Lexemen (wenn auch nicht immer wörtlich) übersetzt werden, nicht-abgeleitete (die nur über eine – pejorative – Bedeutung verfügen zum Beispiel Trottel – лох) mit nicht-abgeleiteten und formale (affixale Modelle, Zusammensetzungen) mit entsprechenden formalen Äquivalenten.
  • Die Häufigkeit des Gebrauchs sollte in beiden sprachlichen Varietäten annähernd übereinstimmen.
  • Die stilistische Färbung der Wörter in beiden Sprachen sollte im Einklang stehen. Dementsprechend werden im Deutsch-Ukrainischen Schimpfwörterbuch dialektale pejorative Lexeme (hauptsächlich aus dem bayerisch-österreichischen Sprachraum) ins Ukrainische mit ebenfalls dialektalen Pejorativa (aus dem Lviver Urbanolekt) übersetzt, vgl. Koffer – матолок, Wappla – бомок, Sepp – сьвірок, Schierchling – шкарада, und Pejorativa aus der Jugendsprache mit jugendsprachlichen, vgl. Alki – алік, алкан, алкаш, Null-Bock-Kerl – пофігіст, Schizo – шиз.

Ferner sollten bei der Übersetzung nach Möglichkeit auch die Zahl der Silben sowie generell lautliche Ähnlichkeiten berücksichtigt werden wie zum Beispiel bei Babler – баляндрасник, Stümper – штурпак, Schlampe – шльондра, шлюха.

Bei der Übersetzung von Pejorativa sehen wir uns außerdem mit einer sprachlichen Asymmetrie konfrontiert, die sich in den asymmetrischen synonymischen Reihen wiederspiegelt und die durch gesellschaftliche, mentale und kulturelle Besonderheiten verursacht wird. So entsprechen dem deutschen Pfuscher vier ukrainische Pejorativa – капарник, партач, халтурник, халявник. Zur Bezeichnung eines korrupten Menschen findet sich im Ukrainischen eine ganze Reihe von pejorativen Lexemen: хапко, хапуга, дерій, здирник, хабарник; im Deutschen (Wienerischen) kenne ich dagegen kein einziges pejoratives Substantiv zur Bezeichnung eines korrupten Menschen. Anders bei den pejorativen Lexemen zur Bezeichnung eines pedantischen, kleinlichen Menschen: Im Ukrainischen gibt es abgesehen von dem emotiv neutralen Lexem педант ‘Pedant’, das potentiell als Schimpfwort funktionieren kann, überhaupt keine pejorativen Lexeme zur Bezeichnung eines pedantischen beziehungsweise kleinlichen Menschen, im Deutschen (und im Wienerischen) hingegen finden wir mehrere pejorative Lexeme, die sich durch ausgeprägte Bildhaftigkeit auszeichnen, vgl. Haarspalter, Kümmelspalter oder I-Tüpferlreiter.

Folgen wir der These, dass die Pejorativa auf verbreitete Eigenschaften und Schwachstellen abzielen, und verbinden wir diese mit den stereotypen Vorstellungen von Deutschen als besonders korrekter, pedantischer Nation, so hätten wir eine Erklärung, warum es im Deutschen eine Reihe von pejorativen Lexemen zur Bezeichnung eines Pedanten gibt. In gleicher Weise steht die Tatsache, dass die Korruption in der Ukraine ein gravierendes Problem darstellt, im Zusammenhang mit der Vielfalt von Lexemen zur Bezeichnung eines korrupten Menschen.

3.1.1. Wenn ein Schwanz zum Arschloch wird: Metamorphosen beim Übersetzen von Pejorativa

Die Beachtung der vier oben angeführten Kriterien ermöglicht die Übersetzung pejorativer Lexik, so dass neben dem begrifflichen und emotiven Inhalt auch die Intensität, die Häufigkeit des Gebrauchs und die Stilistik übereinstimmen sowie etymologische Parallelen berücksichtigt werden. Um es an einem konkreten Beispiel zu veranschaulichen, wähle ich eines der gebräuchlichsten Pejorativa im Deutschen generell und im Wienerischen im Besonderen: Arschloch/Oaschloch. Das ukrainische Äquivalent, das ich im Deutsch-Ukrainischen Schimpfwörterbuch vorschlage, ist auch das häufig gebrauchte pejorative Lexem мудак (wörtlich Hodensack). In den beiden Sprachen ist die Intensität der Lexeme ähnlich stark, dasselbe betrifft auch die Häufigkeit des Gebrauchs. Sowohl im Deutschen als auch im Ukrainischen zählen diese Pejorativa zu den universalen pejorativen Lexemen, das heißt sie können in Bezug auf jeden Menschen gebraucht werden, über den wir uns ärgern, unabhängig von den Eigenschaften oder dem Verhalten der Adressatin beziehungsweise des Adressaten, die unsere negativen Emotionen hervorgerufen haben. Was die Etymologie der Lexeme Arschloch und мудак betrifft, so beziehen sich beide auf intime Körperteile des Menschen. Der Unterschied liegt darin, dass das deutsche Lexem auf den analen Bereich und das ukrainische auf den männlichen Geschlechtsbereich zurückzuführen ist.

Die Sprache als Teil der gesellschaftlichen Realität widerspiegelt gesellschaftlichen Veränderungen, besonders in den Umbruchszeiten. So würde ich heute das Deutsche (Wienerische) Pejorativum Arschloch/Oaschloch mit einem anderen ukrainischen Pejorativum übersetzen, mit хуйло (von хуй ‘Schwanz’), das in den letzten Jahren dank dem Gebrauch im Anti-Putin-Sprechgesang Путін хуйло sehr häufig geworden ist. Erstmals von den ukrainischen Fußballfans Ende März 2014 gesungen (Путін хуйло ла ла ла ла ла ла ла ла Putin ist ein Riesenarschloch), kam es zur schnellen Verbreitung des Spruchs so dass er zum Internet Meme wurde. Im deutschen Wikipedia-Artikel wird хуйло wörtlich als ‘Pimmel’ übersetzt. Bei diesem Vorgehen stimmen zwar die denotativen Bedeutungsaspekte überein (abgesehen vom differentiellen Sem „Größe“), nicht aber die emotiven. Die Intensität des Wortes, die Stilistik und die Häufigkeit des Gebrauchs, das heißt Kriterien, die bei der Übersetzung pejorativer Lexik wichtig sind, wurden nicht ausreichend beachtet: Das deutsche Pejorativum wird in der Kindersprache verwendet, während das ukrainische ein derbes Pejorativum darstellt. Da bei den Pejorativa die begriffliche Bedeutung im Hintergrund steht und der konnotative (emotive) Bedeutungsaspekt dominiert, ist es gerechtfertigt, bei der Übersetzung von dem Bereich, aus dem die jeweilige Sprache ihre Pejorativa schöpft, in einen anderen zu wechseln. Im Falle des Spruchs Путін хуйло vollzieht sich der Wechsel vom sexuellen in den fäkal-analen Bereich: Das von mir vorgeschlagene Äquivalent im Deutschen – (Riesen-)Arschloch – entspricht dem ukrainischen Pejorativum sowohl bezüglich der Intensität und Häufigkeit des Gebrauchs als auch inhaltlich: Wie auch bei хуйло handelt es sich um ein universales metaphorisches Pejorativum, mit dem wir einen als widerlich, niederträchtig und/oder mies wahrgenommenen Menschen bezeichnen.

Im Weiteren möchte ich auf die Besonderheiten der Übersetzung zweier Gruppen pejorativer Lexeme hingehen: metaphorische Pejorativa und formale Pejporativa.

3.1.1.1. Metaphorische Pejorativa

Die wörtliche Übersetzung metaphorischer Pejorativa ist in erster Linie dank demselben tertium comparationis, das heißt dank der Eigenschaft, die beide in der Metapher verglichenen Dinge oder Wesen gemeinsam haben, in beiden Sprachen möglich: Dreck und Scheiße – ekelhaft und widerlich, Kuh – dick, Schwein und Sau – dick und/oder schmutzig, Esel – dumm und stur, Stute, Hengst – gesund und sexuell ungezügelt usw.

Während in einigen Fällen das tertium comparationis bei den Tiermetaphern in den beiden Sprachen gleich ist und diese Wörter sich mit den gleichen Tiermetaphern übersetzen lassen, ist es in anderen Fällen unmöglich, da mit dem betreffenden Tier in einer anderen Sprache keine negative stereotype Vorstellung verbunden wird, wie zum Beispiel im Falle von Pute im Ukrainischen, oder dem Tier sogar, wie bei Ochse und Eule im Ukrainischen, eine positive Eigenschaft zugeschrieben wird. In diesen Fällen sollte in der anderen Sprache eine Tiermetapher gefunden werden, deren tertium comparationis mit dem deutschen Lexem übereinstimmt, vgl. Ochse – муфлон ‘Muflon’, Pute – вівця ‘Schaf’, Eule – мавпа ‘Affe’.

Auch Pejorativa anderer metaphorischen Gruppen lassen sich nicht immer direkt in den Lviver Urbanolekt übersetzen, da im Ukrainischen mit diesen Lebewesen (Dingen, Pflanzen usw.) keine negativen Eigenschaften verbunden werden und sie deshalb keine übertragene pejorative Bedeutung aufweisen, zum Beispiel Gurke(n), Koffer, Schachtel, Schwammerl u. a. Bei der Übersetzung dieser Lexeme muss nach Äquivalenten gesucht werden, die auf dieselbe negative Eigenschaft (Verhaltensweise) zielen und im Idealfall auch metaphorische Pejorativa (derselben Gruppe) wie zum Beispiel metaphorische Gruppe „Gegenstände“ sind: Schlitt‘n – підстилка wörtlich ‘Unterlage’, Schachtel (oide) – дрантя (старе) wörtlich ‘alte Fetzen, unnötiges Zeug’.

Ist es nicht möglich, das metaphorische Pejorativum mit einem pejorativen Äquivalent aus derselben metaphorischen Gruppe zu übersetzen, müssen Entsprechungen aus anderen metaphorischen Gruppen oder formale Pejorativa genommen werden wie im folgenden Beispiel, in dem sich ein Wechsel von der metaphorischen Gruppe „Obst/Gemüse“ zu der metaphorischen Gruppe „Tier“ vollzieht: Zwetschke – жаба wörtlich ‘Frosch’.

Schwierigkeiten können auch bei der Übersetzung metaphorischer pejorativer Lexeme auftreten, die von Vor- und Nachnamen gebildet werden und übertragene pejorative Bedeutung haben. Man muss hier in erster Linie feststellen, mit welcher Eigenschaft dieser Name verbunden wird und dann nach einem Namen im Ukrainischen suchen, der mit derselben Eigenschaft (demselben Charakterzug oder Verhalten) verknüpft ist: Heini – Іванко, Urschel – Марина, Trine – Мариська, Sepp – Василько. Wie sich herausstellt, sind es sowohl im Wienerischen als auch im Lviver Urbanolekt alte und verbreitete Namen oder Namenvarianten, die vorwiegend dümmliche, einfältige, lächerliche und gutmütige Menschen bezeichnen.

Im Wienerischen sind die metaphorischen Pejorativa, die mit Handlungen verbunden sind, sehr produktiv. Dazu gehören sowohl Lexeme, die von Verben aus dem Bereich der Körperausscheidungen gebildet werden (Scheißa, Brunzla usw.) und sich wörtlich ins Ukrainische übersetzen lassen (серун, сикун, засцянець), als auch bildhafte zusammengesetzte Lexeme, deren wörtliche Bedeutung „fast oder ganz irreal ist“ (Kiener 1983: 148). Die Übersetzung dieser Gruppe von Pejorativa in eine andere Sprache verlangt kreatives Herangehen: Während in einigen Fällen wörtliche Übersetzung möglich ist (Blutsauga – кровопій, Tellerlecka – блюдолиз, Halsabschneida – горлоріз, Oaschlecka – дуполиз), muss bei der Übersetzung anderer Lexeme dieser Gruppe nach Äquivalenten gesucht werden, die auch zur selben metaphorischen Gruppe gehören, durch Bildhaftigkeit gekennzeichnet sind und auf dieselbe Eigenschaft (dasselbe Verhalten) des Adressaten beziehungsweise der Adressatin gerichtet sind: Eisenbeißa – вибийоко eine Zusammenrückung mit wörtlicher Bedeutung ‘Schlag das Auge aus’, Läuseknicka – загнибіда wörtlich ‘biege den Kummer’.

Wenn die Übersetzung eines metaphorischen Pejorativums mit dem metaphorischen Äquivalent nicht möglich ist, werden formale (Ableitungen, Zusammensetzungen) oder nicht abgeleitete Pejorativa in Betracht gezogen: Koffer – матолок Tölpel, Gurkn – недотепа Nichtskönner, Nudel – товстуля ‘Dickerchen, Kröte – нахаба ‘Frechling. Die umgekehrte Situation ist ebenfalls möglich: Für ein formales deutsches (wienerisches) Pejorativum wird ein metaphorisches ukrainisches gewählt: Dämling – шпак wörtlich ‘Star’ (in der Bedeutung ‘Vogel’), Blödmann – баняк wörtlich ‘Topf’, Oaschkerl – гад wörtlich ‘Natter’.

3.1.1.2. Formale Pejorativa

Bei der Übersetzung formaler pejorativer Lexeme sollte in Betracht gezogen werden, dass im Deutschen (im Wienerischen) und im Ukrainischen (im Lviver Urbanolekt) verschiedene pejorative Wortbildungsmuster produktiv sind: Im Deutschen sind präfixale und zusammengesetzte Modelle produktiv, im Ukrainischen hingegen suffixale Modelle. Deshalb werden wienerische präfixale/halbpräfixale und zusammengesetzte pejorative Lexemen im Lviver Urbanolket mit suffixalen Pejorativa wiedergegeben: Oberoaschloch – мудацюра, Obersäufer пияцюра, Sauvieh – скотиняра. Bei den ersten zwei Pejorativa entspricht dem Halbpräfix Ober- das ukrainische pejorative Suffix -цюра und beim dritten Pejorativum tritt an Stelle des Halbpräfixes Sau- das pejorative Suffix -яра auf.

Auch Determinativkomposita lassen sich nicht mit einem Wort ins Ukrainische übersetzen, wobei bei der Übersetzung ins Ukrainische das Bestimmungswort die Form des Attributs annehmen muss: Hurensohnкурвий син Sohn einer Hure, Nazischweine – нацистські свині nazistische Schweine, Fettsau - груба льоха ‘fette Sau’, Vollkoffer – матолок квадратовий ‘Tölpel hoch Zwei’. Einen besonderen Fall stellen Pejorativa dar, deren Bestimmungswort eine Ortsbezeichnung ist und bei denen folglich Toponyme beider Sprachen in Übereinstimmung gebraucht werden müssen: vgl. Steinhofidiotвар´ят з Кульпаркова Verrückter von Kulparkiv, wo Steinhof und Кульпарків Bezeichnungen für Stadteile in Wien bzw. in Lviv sind, in denen sich Anstalten für Menschen mit psychischen Normabweichungen befinden. Noch ein Beispiel: Praterhur und Gürtelhur – шльондра з Валів ‘Flittchen von …’, wo der Wiener Prater beziehungsweise Gürtel und Вали in Lviv als Stadtteile erwähnt werden, in denen sich Prostituierte versammeln oder versammelt haben.

3.1.2. Beleidigende Vergleiche und Bemerkungen

Die Beleidigung der Adressatin/des Adressaten kann nicht nur durch Schimpfwörter, sondern auch mittels einem abwertenden Vergleich oder einer herabwürdigenden Bemerkung erfolgen. Bei einem Teil dieser Äußerungen ist eine wörtliche Übersetzung möglich, zum Beispiel ang’soffen wie ein Badschwamm – пити (п´яний) як губка, stur wie ein Esel – впертий як віслюк u. a, bei den anderen dagegen nicht. Beispiele hierfür sind:

schiach wia da Zins – страшний(а) як атомна війна wörtlich ‘häßlich wie der Atomkrieg’; in verschiedenen Zeiten entstanden – das Wienerische in der Zeit der Wirtschaftskrise Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts, seine Entsprechung im Lviver Urbanolekt im kalten Krieg – spiegeln diese Vergleiche die Ängste der Menschen wieder.

Dumm wie Brot – дурний як сало без хліба wörtlich ‘dumm wie Speck ohne Brot’. Interessant in diesem Beispiel ist, dass in den beiden sprachlichen Varietäten zum Vergleich nicht wie üblich negativ bewertete Gegenstände/Lebensmittel/Tiere herangezogen werden, sondern positive, nämlich Brot und Speck. Im Lviver Urbanolekt wird der negative Vergleich mit Hilfe des den Ukrainern stereotyp zugeschriebenen Lieblingslebensmittels Speck durch den Zusatz ohne Brot abgeschwächt.

Eine wörtliche Übersetzung von negativen Vergleichen ist in den Fällen nicht möglich, wenn die in einem Urbanolekt für den Vergleich herangezogenen Gegenstände oder Lebewesen im anderen nicht mit negativen oder gar mit einer positiven Eigenschaft verbunden werden: Blöd wie Stiefelabsatz/Stroh. Zur Übersetzung müssen ebenfalls bildkräftige Vergleiche herangezogen werden, zum Beispiel дурний як пень/ціп wörtlich ‘dumm wie ein Baumstamm/Dreschflegel’.

Dasselbe gilt für die Übersetzung von beleidigenden Bemerkungen:

  • Wörtliche Übersetzung:
    Bist deppert!? – Ти здурів (здуріла)!?
    Man könnte deinen Kopf mit dem Arsch verwechseln В тебе дупа замість голови.
    Dem hams ins Hian gschissn – Йому (їй) насрали до голови. Diese beleidigende Äußerung kann in beiden Varietäten auch erweitert werdenund ned obeloss’n beziehungsweise і забули перемішати wörtlich ‘und haben vergessen umzurühren’.
  • Nicht wörtliches Übersetzen, das den Sinn und die Metaphorik wiedergibt:
    Hin in der Marülln – Не всі вдома wörtlich ‘bei dem/der sind nicht alle zu Hause’.
    Einen Vogel haben – Мати крілики (бомки) в голові wörtlich ‘der/die hat Karnickel/Hummel im Kopf’.

3.2. Sprechakt Fluch

Der Sprechakt Fluch ist im Gegensatz zur Beschimpfung nicht auf eine Person, sondern auf eine (meist ärgerliche) Situation ausgerichtet. Dabei werden im Deutschen (Wienerischen) Wörter und Wendungen aus dem fäkalen und sakralen Bereich verwendet. Bei der Übersetzung in den Lviver Urbanolekt des sowohl im Deutschen wie auch im Wienerischen häufigsten Fluchwortes Scheiße vollzieht sich der Wechsel vom fäkalen zum sexuellen Bereich, weil diesem Wort im Lviver Urbanolekt das häufig gebrauchte Fluchwort курва ‘Hure’ am besten entspricht. Die Aufforderung Geh scheißen, die im Wienerischen häufig situationsbezogen als Fluch funktioniert, kann im Lviver Urbanolekt ebenfalls mit einer zusammengerückten Aufforderung, die zum Fluchen verwendet wird, übersetzt werden: Насерматри ‘Scheiß deiner Mutter’. In diesem Fall bleiben wir bei der Übersetzung im Bereich des Fäkalen, das im Lviver Urbanolekt durch die Mutterbeleidigung erweitert wird.

Die in katholischen Gegenden, in denen auch die in diesem Beitrag untersuchten sprachlichen Varietäten gesprochen werden, ebenfalls häufigen Erwähnungen der Namen Gottes und der Heiligen, die ich ebenfalls zum Sprechakt Fluch zähle, können wörtlich übersetzt werden: Jessas! Jessas und Maria! Ісус Марія! Dasselbe gilt für die Flüche mit der Erwähnung des Teufels: Zum Teufel – до дідька!

Die infolge reger Migrationsprozesse in den letzten Jahren bei den Wiener Jugendlichen häufige Äußerung Ich fick deine Mutter/Deine Mutter! können wir im Lviver Urbanolekt als Курва твоя мама! wörtlich ‘Deine Mutter ist eine Hure!’ oder wörtlich als (Йоб) твою мать/Твою мать! wiedergeben. Der letzte Ausdruck, obwohl er heutzutage häufig auch von dialektsprechenden Personen desemantisiert gebraucht wird, war vor 1939 in der Westukraine unbekannt. Er ist erst mit den sowjetischen Soldaten eingezogen und hat sich in allen Altersgruppen und sozialen Gruppen verbreitet.

Bei der Euphemisierung von Fluchwörtern werden die Pejorativa durch neutrale Wörter ersetzt, bei denen der erste Laut oder die erste Silbe denen im pejorativen Lexem entsprechen; sie werden durch eine absichtliche Pause noch zusätzlich hervorgehoben (auf der schriftlichen Ebene durch drei Punkte gekennzeichnet). Dadurch werden die pejorativen Konnotationen geweckt, ohne das Pejorativum ausgesprochen werden muss: Sch...ade! (statt Scheiße), Кур...ча! ‘Kücken’ statt kурва ‘Hure’, Йди до ду...ші/Ду...наю ‘Geh in die Seele/Geh an die Donau!’ statt Йди до дупи ‘Geh in den Arsch’. Euphemistische Flüche wie Scheibenkleister! Scheibe! können in Lviver Urbanolekt mit Ausdrücken Курча (ляґа)! Курна хата! wörtlich: ‘Rauchhaus’, Куртка на ваті! wörtlich ‘wattierte Jacke’ übersetzt werden, Ich scheiß mich an! mit На середині міста wörtlich ‘Mitten in der Stadt!’, einem Euphemismus für Насерматри! ‘Scheißdeinermutter’.

3.3. Sprechakt Drohung

Der Zusammenhang zwischen verbaler und physischer Aggression (verbale Aggression als Ersatz physischer) wird am Beispiel dieses Sprechaktes besonders anschaulich, da Drohungen jene Handlungen verbalisieren, die die sprechende Person der adressierten Person antun würde, wenn sie keine Angst vor ihr, vor dem Gericht oder anderen Sanktionen hätte.

In beiden sprachlichen Varietäten wird häufig mit physischer Aggression und insbesondere mit einer Ohrfeige gedroht. Wie auch bei anderen aggressiven Sprechakten kann eine Reihe von Drohungen wörtlich übersetzt werden, wobei in beiden Urbanolekten idiomatische Redewendungen dominieren:

I drah da den Hals um! – Я тобі скручу в´язи (шию)!
I hau di in di Gosch´n! – Я тобі вріжу по писку!
I hau di in die Fresse! – Я тобі заїду в пику!
I bring di um! – Я тебе заб`ю!

Die Häufigkeit idiomatischer Redewendungen bei den aggressiven Sprechakten lässt sich dadurch erklären, dass die schimpfende Person im Zustand des Affektes keine Zeit zum Nachdenken hat und auf festgefügte Formen zurückgreift.

Eine einfache Drohung mit physischer Gewalt erscheint der drohenden Person im Affektzustand meistens nicht genug, weshalb es in beiden sprachlichen Varietäten zahlreiche erweiterte Drohungen gibt, die neben realer physischer Handlung eine (oft hyperbolisierte) Beschreibung ihrer Folgen beinhalten. Mit einigen Ausnahmen (I hau di auf den Schädl, dass du aus dem Fenster fliegst! – Я тобі дам по черепку що з вікна вилетиш!) lassen sich diese Drohungen meistens nicht wörtlich wiedergeben, sondern es müssen Erweiterungen gefunden werden, deren Intensität und Bildkräftigkeit in den beiden Sprachen/Dialekten übereinstimmen, vgl. I hau da ane, dass d mit’m Oasch auf’ d Uhr schaust! – Як ти вріжу межи вочu, то ти в сраці забулькоче! wörtlich ‘dass es dir im Arsch blubbert’ oder I hau da ane, dass du di noch auf der Westbahn drahst! – Як вріжу, то зубів не позбираєш! wörtlich ‘dass du deine Zähle noch lange sammeln wirst’.

Für einige von den befragten Wienerinnen und Wienern angeführten besonders brutalen Drohungen habe ich noch keine Vorschläge im Lviver Urbanolekt, was nicht von ihrer Unübersetzbarkeit zeugt und einen Impuls für kreative Übersetzerinnen und Übersetzer darstellt: I reiß da den Schädel ob und scheiß da in den Hals! I reiß da di Brust auf und scheiß da aufs Herz!

3.4. Sprechakt Verwünschung

Dieser Sprechakt ist in den beiden untersuchten sprachlichen Varietäten nicht gleich häufig – während im Lviver Urbanolekt die Verwünschungen sehr zahlreich sind, kommen sie im Wienerischen selten vor. In folgenden Fällen können wir die Verwünschungen wörtlich übersetzen:

Verrecke! – Здохни! (Щоб ти здох!)
Krepieren sollst! – Щоб ти ноги натягнув!
Den Hals soll er sich brechen! – Щоб ти собі в`язи скрутив!
Die Hand soll dir abfallen! – Щоб тобі рука відпала!
Ein Teifl soll di holen!Дідько б тебе вхопив (і на скали заніс)!

Der Blitz soll di treffen! Щоб тебе грім побив! Interessanterweise ist es im Ukrainischen aber nicht der Blitz, der die adressierte Person treffen soll, sondern der Donner.

Die häufigste Verwünschung im Lviver Urbanolekt präsentiert die Äußerung Шляк би тебе трафив! – Der Schlag soll dich treffen! Die Bedeutung dieser in Galizien sehr häufigen Verwünschung ist den Benutzerinnen und Benutzern oft nicht bekannt; die deutsche Wendung hat sich soweit assimiliert, dass sie ukrainische Endungen angenommen hat und den Regeln der ukrainischen Grammatik gehorcht. Von der Häufigkeit des Gebrauchs der Verwünschung Щoб Тебе шляк трафив! ‘Der Schlag soll dich treffen’ zeugt die Tatsache, dass vom Germanismus шляк ‘Schlag’ ein Verb abgeleitet worden ist, das den Gebrauch dieser Verwünschung bezeichnet und auch synonym sowohl zum Sprechakt Verwünschung als auch zur verbalen Aggression generell (das heißt zum Verb schimpfen) gebraucht wird – шлякувати.

Die im Wienerischen häufige und meistens scherzhaft gebrauchte Verwünschung Wünsche dir Krätze am Oasch und zu kurze Hände zum Kratzen! hat keine Entsprechung im Lviver Urbanolekt, könnte aber wörtlich übersetzt werden, da sie zu der Gruppe der in beiden sprachlichen Varietäten häufigen aus dem Jiddischen entlehnten Verwünschungen gehört. Diese wörtlich aus dem Jiddischen übersetzten Verwünschungen sind besonders kreativ und heimtückisch. (Kiener (1983: 288) meint, dass das Jiddische auf diesem Gebiet „eine geradezu dichterische Kultur“ entwickelt hat.

Verwünschungen lassen sich in zwei Gruppen gliedern:

(A) Verwünschungen, die aus zwei Teilen bestehen, wobei der im ersten Teil enthaltene Unheilwunsch im zweiten Teil der Verwünschung noch verstärkt wird, vgl. Du sollst in einzelne Stücke zerfallen und anders zusammenwachsen!Аби с на кавалки розпався а інакше зрісся! und Alle Zähne sollen dir ausfallen bis auf einen – fürs Zahnweh! Най би тобі всі зуби повилітали крім одного і щоб він болів тебе ціле життя!

(B) Verwünschungen, deren erster Teil einen positiven Wunsch (oder einige positive Wünsche) enthält, der/die im zweiten Teil zunichte gemacht und für die adressierte Person ins Gegenteil verkehrt wird/werden, vgl. Wünsche dir 10 Häuser, in jedem Haus 10 Zimmer, in jedem Zimmer ein schönes weiches Bett – und das Fiber möge dich von einem Bett ins andere werfen!
Da die Verwünschung im Lviver Urbanolekt den häufigsten aggressiven Sprechakt ausmacht, gibt es dementsprechend auch viele Euphemismen, von denen hier nur einige besonders kreative erwähnt werden:
Щоб тебе качка копнула! ‘Die Ente soll dir einen Tritt geben!’
Щоб тебе пес облизав! ‘Der Hund soll dich abschlecken!’
Щоб тебе віденська кава залила! wörtlich ‘Der Wiener Kaffee soll dich übergießen!’

Als Ersatz-Verwünschungen funktionieren auch Segenswünsche: Щоб тобі добре було! wörtlich ‘Gut soll es Dir gehen!’ oder Щоб ти здоровий/а був/була! wörtlich ‘Gesund sollst du sein!’ werden, mit entsprechendem Nachdruck artikuliert, im Kontext unmissverständlich als Verwünschungen identifiziert.

Die euphemistischen Verwünschungen im Lviver Urbanolekt stellen beim Übersetzen ins Deutsche (Wienerische) eine Herausforderung dar; ein Vorschlag für ihre Wiedergabe im Wienerischen wäre zum Beispiel mittels eines anderen euphemistischen Sprechakts – der Aufforderung Hab mi gern/Du kannst mi gern haben!

3.5. Sprechakt Aggressive Aufforderung

Der Sprechakt Aggressive Aufforderung wird in beiden Urbanolekten häufig in Konfliktsituationen verwendet; dabei wird die Adressatin/der Adressat meistens zum Verschwinden oder zum Schweigen aufgefordert:

Geh zum Teufel! – Йди до дідька!
Leck mi am Oasch! – Поцілуй мене в дупу!
Hoit di Goschn! – Стуль писок (ґепу)!
Schleich di!  –  Гибай!
Gusch! – Замкни куферок! ‘Mach den Koffer zu!
Hoit di Pappn! – Заткай си канал (най не смердит)! ‘Mach den Kanal zu (damit es nicht stinkt)’
Hau di über die Häusa! – Пендзилюй!
Lass mi anglahnt! – Випхайся сіном! ‘Hau ab mit dem Heu’

Die Übersetzung in den ersten drei Beispielen erfolgt wörtlich (mit Verwendung bildhafter Pejorativa zur Bezeichnung des Mundes), in den anderen stehen den Wienerischen Ausdrücken entsprechend intensive und bildhafte im Lviver Urbanolekt gegenüber, die sich auch nicht alle direkt ins Deutsche übersetzen lassen.

Aggressive Aufforderungen können auch im Ukrainischen (im Lviver Urbanolekt) erweitert werden: Geh in Oasch (Erweiterung: wann in Hümme kummst eh net/da hast du’s nicht weit!) – Йди до дупи (Erweiterung: з ложкою ‘mit dem Löffel’).

Auch dieser aggressive Sprechakt weist Redewendungen auf, deren Übersetzung Kreativität der Übersetzerin/des Übersetzers verlangt, zum Beispiel Moch dir ein Loch im Knie und schieb a Gurkerl rein!, Hupf in Gatsch und schlage Wellen! oder Rutsch mir den Buckel runter und brems mit der Zunge!

Für die Lviver euphemistische Aufforderungen Йди до Дунаю/душі/Дублян/! wörtlich ‘Geh an die Donau/in die Seele/nach Dubljany (eine Stadt bei Lviv)’ anstatt Йди до дупи! würde ich eine okkasionelle Aufforderung, die ich in meinem Materialkorpus habe, vorschlagen: Geh dir ein Zuckerl kaufen!

Die von befragten Wienerinnen und Wienern häufig erwähnte euphemistische Aufforderung Du kannst mi gern haben! Hab mi gern! kann mit einem anderen aggressiven Sprechakt im Lviver Urbanolekt, nämluich den euphemistischen Verwünschungen А щоб Тобі добре було! wörtlich: ‘Gut soll es dir gehen!’ beziehungsweise А щоб ти здоровий був/була! wörtlich ‘Gesund sollst du sein!’ übersetzt werden. Mit diesen optimistisch klingenden euphemistischen aggressiven Sprechakten möchte ich die Analyse beenden.

4. Zusammenfassung und Ausblick

Die Wörtliche Übersetzung deutscher Pejorativa ins Ukrainische ist auf Grund der Verankerung des pejorativen Vokabulars beider Sprachen im fäkal-analen Bereich sowie der Nähe beider Kulturen, die sich in metaphorischer Affinität äußert, möglich. Bei der nichtwörtlichen Übersetzung von Pejorativa unterscheiden sich die begrifflichen Aspekte der Wörter, während die konnotativen (negativ-emotiven) Aspekte, die für die adäquate Wiedergabe der Pejorativität ausschlaggebend sind, übereinstimmen.

Das Distanzieren von der begrifflichen Bedeutung bei der Übersetzung von Pejorativa ist wegen der Dominanz des konnotativen (negativ-emotiven) Aspekts in der Bedeutungsstruktur von Pejorativa möglich. Beim Übersetzen formeller Pejorativa sollte die Produktivität verschiedener Wortbildungsmodelle im Deutschen und im Ukrainischen berücksichtigt werden; beim Übersetzen von metaphorischen Pejorativa sollte die Tatsache, dass den Vergleichen in diesen Sprachen unterschiedliche Eigenschaften oder Verhaltensweisen zugrunde liegen, Beachtung finden.

Generell sollten beim Übersetzen von Pejorativa folgende Kriterien beachtet werden: die Intensität, morphologische und strukturell-semantische Aspekte, die Frequentivität sowie die stilistische Färbung. Die in diesem Beitrag vorgeschlagenen vier Kriterien für die Übersetzung von Pejorativa können ihre praktische Anwendung bei der Übersetzung von literarischen Texten oder Filmen finden.

Die Unmöglichkeit wörtlicher Übersetzung stimuliert kreatives Herangehen beim Übersetzen von Pejorativa und aggressiven Sprechakten. Abgesehen von den vorgeschlagenen vier Kriterien für die Übersetzung pejorativer Wörter und Wendungen wäre es auch eine Möglichkeit, eine dialektsprechende Person miteinzubeziehen, der die Konfliktsituation (sei es in einem Film oder im literarischen Text) erklärt wird und die dazu bewegt wird, der Situation entsprechend zu schimpfen. Die auf diese Weise übersetzten Streitsituationen würden sich durch ein hohes Maß an Natürlichkeit auszeichnen. Die Übersetzung kann bei diesem Herangehen wesentlich vom Original abweichen: Beispielsweise kann ein aggressiver Sprechakt mit einem anderen, in diesem Dialekt/Urbanolekt häufigeren oder ausdrucksstärkeren übersetzt werden; die Schimpfwörter würden nicht auf der gleichen etymologischen und morphologisch-semantischen Basis beruhen (zum Beispiel metaphorische, formale u. a.), sondern es kann ein beliebiges Schimpfwort verwendet werden, das zu dieser Konfliktsituation passt. Diese Freiheit beim Übersetzen ist möglich, da bei den Pejorativa nicht der begriffliche Inhalt, sondern der konnotative (negativ-emotive) Bedeutungsaspekt im Vordergrund steht. Zwar kann solche Übersetzung als nicht exakt wahrgenommen werden, aber gerade diese nicht exakte Übersetzung entspricht ihrem Wesen – die (negativen) Emotionen in einer anderen Sprache auf eine Weise wiederzugeben, wie in dieser Sprache in dieser Situation geschimpft würde (vgl. Gauger 2012: 50).

Der Mangel an Arbeiten im Bereich der Übersetzung von Pejorativa einerseits und die Vielfalt des pejorativen Vokabulars in vielen Sprachen andererseits eröffnen breite Perspektiven für die künftige Forschung. Der Rahmen eines Beitrags erlaubt lediglich einen allgemeinen Überblick über die Übersetzungsmöglichkeiten verschiedener Gruppen pejorativer Lexik; im Weiteren wäre es sinnvoll, die Besonderheiten der Übersetzung einzelner Gruppen von Pejorativa zu erforschen. Besonders interessant erscheinen aus der Sicht der Übersetzung Pejorativa, die mit Personennamen verbunden sind, sowie andere Gruppen metaphorischer Pejorativa.

Literaturverzeichnis

Daniel, Walter Karl (2006) Das nicht immer so goldene Wienerherz. Das besondere Schimpfwörterlexikon mit ausgewählten 1300 Spitzenausdrücken, Verlag und Edition Wien (Eigenverlag).

Gauger, Hans-Martin (2012) Das Feuchte und das Schmutzige. Kleine Linguistik der vulgären Sprache, München, Beck.

Gernentz, Hans Joachim (1964) „Sprachschichten im heutigen Deutsch“ Jezyki obce w szkolie 5: 257-268.

Havryliv, Oksana (2005) Deutsch-Ukrainisches Schimpfwörterbuch, Lviv, Apriori.

Havryliv, Oksana (2008) „Germanismen im Ukrainischen in Galizien“ in Beiträge des Internationalen Symposiums „Kulturräume und Erinnerungsorte“, Lviv, Klassyka: 129-139.

Havryliv, Oksana (2009) Verbale Aggression. Formen und Funktionen am Beispiel des Wienerischen, Frankfurt am Main, Peter Lang.

Jontes, Günter (1987) Das große österreichische Schimpfwörterbuch, Fohnsdorf, Podmenik.

Kiener, Franz (1983) Das Wort als Waffe. Zur Psychologie der verbalen Aggression, Göttingen, Vandenhoeck und Ruprecht.

Karavans’yy, Svyatoslav (2000) = Караванський Святослав (2000) Практичний словник синонімів української мови, Київ, Українська книга.

Khobzey, Natalya et al. (2012) = Хобзей, Наталія та ін. (2012) Лексикон львівський: поважно і на жарт, Львів, Інститут українознавств ім. Івана Крип’якевича НАН України.

Löffler, Heinrich (2005) Germanistische Soziolinguistik, Berlin, Erich Schmidt.

Lötscher Andreas (1980) Lappi, Lööli, blööde Siech! Schimpfen und Fluchen im Schweizerdeutschen, Frauenfeld, Huber.

Mayr, Max (1980) Das Wienerische. Art und Redensart, Wien und München, Amalthea.

Mokienko, Valerij, Harry, Walter (1999) „Lexikographische Probleme eines mehrsprachigen Schimpfwörterbuchs“ Anzeiger für slawische Philologie XXVI, Wolfgang Eismann und Klaus Trost (Hrsg.): 199-210.

Nabrings, Kirsten (1981) Sprachliche Varietäten, Tübingen, Narr.

Putin chuilo, URL: http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Putin_chuilo (aufgerufen am 22.06.2017).

Searle, John R (1991) Intentionalität. Eine Abhandlung zur Philosophie des Geistes, Frankfurt am Main, Suhrkamp.

Stavyc’ka, Lesya. (2003) = Ставицька, Леся (2003) Короткий словник жаргонної лексики української мови, Київ, Критика.

Stavyc’ka, Lesya (2008) = Ставицька, Леся (2008) Українська мова без табу. Словник нецензурної лексики та її відповідників (обсценізми, евфемізми, сексуалізми), Київ, Критика.

Wehle, Peter (1980) Sprechen Sie Wienerisch? Wien, Ueberreuter.

Weihs, Richard (2000) Wiener Wut, Wien, Uhudla.

Wintersberger, Astrid, Artmann, H.C. (1995) Wörterbuch Österreichisch – Deutsch, Salzburg-Wien, Residenz.

Wesche, Heinrich (1963) „Deutscher Sprachatlas, Fragebogen, Tonband, moderne Mundart“, Festgabe für Ulrich Pretzel zum 65. Geburtstag, Werner Simon, Wolfgang Bachofer und Wolfgang Dittmann (Hrsg.), Berlin, Erich Schmidt: 355-368.

©inTRAlinea & inTRAlinea Webmaster (2019).
"Zur Übersetzung dialektaler Pejorative – am Beispiel des Wienerischen und des Lviver Urbanolekts"
inTRAlinea Special Issue: The Translation of Dialects in Multimedia IV
Edited by: Klaus Geyer & Margherita Dore
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2458

Translation and Interpreting as a Set of Frames:

By The Editors

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & The Editors (2019).
"Translation and Interpreting as a Set of Frames:"
inTRAlinea News
Edited by: {specials_editors_news}
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2457

©inTRAlinea & The Editors (2019).
"Translation and Interpreting as a Set of Frames:"
inTRAlinea News
Edited by: {specials_editors_news}
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2457

Cfp: Politics of Language, Multilingualism, and Translation in American Studies

By The Editors

Keywords:

©inTRAlinea & The Editors (2019).
"Cfp: Politics of Language, Multilingualism, and Translation in American Studies"
inTRAlinea News
Edited by: {specials_editors_news}
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2456

©inTRAlinea & The Editors (2019).
"Cfp: Politics of Language, Multilingualism, and Translation in American Studies"
inTRAlinea News
Edited by: {specials_editors_news}
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2456

Presentation

By The Editors

©inTRAlinea & The Editors (2019).
"Presentation"
inTRAlinea Commemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna Sky
Edited by: Roberto Menin, Gloria Bazzocchi & Chris Rundle
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2454

In September 2017, a year after his death, the Department of Interpreting and Translation of the University of Bologna organised two days of commemorative events in honour of Giovanni Nadiani: internationally recognised dialect poet and playwright, colleague, founding member of this journal, and much-lamented friend.


The event was called Beyond the Romagna Sky and it brought together poets, writers, translators, actors, musicians, colleagues and other friends, who gathered in Forlì to remember Giovanni and celebrate his work. This commemorative issue presents a selection of the contributions that were made during the event.

We would like to stress that this is not an academic issue and none of the contributions were peer reviewed. Given that this journal would not exist had it not been for energy and spirit of enterprise that Giovanni put into it for 15 years of its life, we wish to provide a permanent testimony of the respect, admiration and affection in which Giovanni is held by all those who were fortunate enough to know him.

©inTRAlinea & The Editors (2019).
"Presentation"
inTRAlinea Commemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna Sky
Edited by: Roberto Menin, Gloria Bazzocchi & Chris Rundle
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2454

Un deserto tutto per noi

By Roberto Menin (Università di Bologna, Italy)

©inTRAlinea & Roberto Menin (2019).
"Un deserto tutto per noi"
inTRAlinea Commemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna Sky
Edited by: Roberto Menin, Gloria Bazzocchi & Chris Rundle
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2455

Le pagine che seguono sono  il frutto di due giornate di studio e spettacolo dedicate a Giovanni Nadiani e tenute a Forlì negli spazi del Museo di San Domenico il 21 e 22 settembre 2017. Per quell’evento utilizzammo il titolo Beyond the Romagna Sky, tratto dal titolo di una raccolta di testi poetici di Nadiani pubblicata nel 2001. Usando l’inglese Nadiani voleva esprimere la pluralità delle lingue, saltando a piè pari la lingua nazionale, l’italiano, che identificava come il codice maggiore, a cui sovrapponeva il minore, le lingue sconfitte, minoritarie, i regioletti, gli idioletti, i rituali del parlato.

Questo numero speciale di Intralinea ospita gli interventi dei partecipanti a quelle emozionanti giornate di rievocazione. Si scoprirà come Nadiani sia stato una figura poliedrica, che ruota attorno al dialetto (romagnolo), ma da lì si alimenta delle relazioni tra le lingue, dei problemi della traduzione letteraria e multimediale, passa alla riflessione sulle forme della poesia e della narrativa breve, nelle performance a teatro e con orchestre jazz. Senza mai dare l’impressione di occuparsi d’altro, Nadiani raccontava in dialetto romagnolo o parlava di traduzione poetica a Turku, si produceva in indimenticabili performance al Teatro Diego Fabbri o assieme al gruppo musicale Faxtet, oppure insegnava traduzione dal tedesco al Dipartimento di Interpretazione e traduzione dell’Università di Bologna, che ha ospitato diversi convegni da lui promossi.

Le ragioni di una coerenza che si alimenta nella diversità, con esiti multiformi, variegati e poliedrici può essere cercata nelle relazioni che seguono, che nella loro polivocità tratteggiano l’immagine dell’uomo, del ricercatore e del poeta. A cominciare da Davide Argnani, poeta e critico, che va al cuore del problema del dialetto. Nadiani non è un cultore che voglia difenderne la purezza contro le evoluzioni della modernità globale, nemmeno come studioso. C’è un bisogno in lui di anti-idillio, dice Argnani, e soprattutto dal destino moderno del dialetto ne esce una lingua nomade, che si mescola ad altri idiomi, alimentata e anche sporcata dai linguaggi specialistici, ma mai cancellata. E c’è anche una forte componente personale, come per tutti coloro che si occupano di un problema che li vede pienamente coinvolti. Le preoccupazioni di Nadiani ruotano attorno alle sorti del dialetto e di chi lo parla, compreso lui stesso. C’è una totale identificazione tra la caducità di quella  lingua che rischiando la sparizione, rischia di cancellare anche il passato di chi è cresciuto con lei, nelle campagne di Faenza. E’ questo vissuto in pericolo, la ferita aperta, che spinge il poeta a farsi traduttore, studioso di altre lingue, a raccontare la sofferenza del quotidiano, ma in dialetto.

Gianfranco Miro Gori, poeta e critico anch’egli, indaga sul lemma dialettale invel (in nessun luogo) nella poesia omonima di Nadiani, da lui tradotta nella variante dialettale di San Mauro Pascoli, e che ritorna in tante composizioni poetiche. Parola modernissima, invel diventa testimonianza per Gori dello spaesamento. La “lingua di sopravvissuti da un'altra era del passato diventa miracolosamente e paradossalmente lingua di apolidi, esuli, senza patria, senza radici se non quelle dialettali.”

Christine Heiss ci conduce su un altro territorio, quello della traduzione multimediale che è terreno di incontro tra la parola e altri sistemi di segni, che approdano al cinema, alla televisione o ai videogiochi. Nadiani ha sondato a lungo la traduzione filmica cercando anche nel cinema le tracce del dialetto e delle sue traduzioni in altre lingue, che studiava con passione, come per il tedesco. Dalle note di Heiss emerge come il dialetto nel cinema è portatore di valori e significati che faticano a varcare i confini e spesso, per le convenzioni attuali del doppiaggio, tendono a essere sacrificati.

In questo e nell’intervento successivo di Irmeli Helin emerge il Nadiani studioso e organizzatore culturale attorno al problema della traduzione del dialetto. Fu promotore e coordinatore del MultiMedia Dialect Translation (MMDT),[1] un forum internazionale che tenne a Forlì due convegni, nel 2007 e nel 2010 e che ha coinvolto e coinvolge ancora studiosi da diversi paesi europei. L’ultimo intervento di Nadiani come relatore fu a Turku nel 2012 e la Helin ricostruisce la pervicace e creativa ricerca di soluzioni all’annoso problema della traduzione di elementi del cosiddetto colorito locale in altre lingue nazionali o in altri dialetti. Come è noto, l’ostacolo principale alla traduzione di elementi dialettali o gergali  è proprio la cooperazione interpretretativa del lettore. Sapendo che si tratta di un’opera tradotta, quindi proveniente da una lingua e da un paese straniero, il lettore accoglie con difficoltà una storia (filmica) della bassa baviera recitata con accenti napoletani o veneziani, perché l’effetto è lo spaesamento. Ne è ben consapevole Nadiani e la Helin ricorda come “spesso il risultato degli sforzi di tradurre il parlato dialettale in un unico dialetto del contesto di arrivo porta “fuori strada, perché il destinatario identifica gli attori con i parlanti del dialetto di arrivo e con i loro contesti di esistenza, cosa che è fuorviante”. Per questa ragione Nadiani proponeva una sorta di ‘lingua artificiale’ formata non da un dialetto ma da diverse parlate regionali, che evitassero l’identificazione parlante=zona di residenza. Oppure era necessario cercare nel contesto linguistico di arrivo di riprodurre le particolarità estranee tramite slang, scelte ritmiche o lessicali substandard. L’importante era comuque ‘salvare’ il portato dialettale nel contesto di arrivo, trovare una soluzione, per quanto straniante suonasse. Nell’ultima parte del suo intervento Helin ricorda un’altra ipotesi che Nadiani negli ultimi tempi difendeva, e che era legata sempre al problema della sopravvivenza dei dialetti e delle lingue delle minoranze. Quest’ultima opzione è una scelta più radicale, che sta avendo diversi riscontri, e cioè la traduzione in dialetto delle opere letterarie della lingua nazionale di riferimento. Il passaggio di valori letterari alti dalla lingua nazionale al dialetto poteva mantenere viva la forza espressiva delle lingue minoritarie, e soprattutto coinvolgeva il lettore in una dimensione di partecipazione critica. In questo caso, il minore (dialetto) era chiamato a rispondere alle sfide estetiche del maggiore (lingua), con la partecipazione del lettore che ne accettava la dimensione di finzione. Immaginare un Torquato Tasso in romagnolo, pur nello straniamento anche comico, non può che costituire una sfida vitale. Esperimenti di questo tipo, tra l’altro in ambito teatrale, ne sono stati fatti con diversi dialetti italiani.

A seguire, Gianni Jasimone, poeta, ricorda in un ciclo di poesie i momenti drammatici della perdita dell’amico, At salut Zvan [Ti saluto, Giovanni], col ricordo personale di Giovanni malato (Le fatiche di Giona) l’invocazione a resistere e il lavoro del lutto e della solitudine di chi resta, che cerca di riprendere la vita. In queste parole, di puro lirismo, si vede quanto Nadiani fosse appassionato combattente capace di entrare nelle corde e negli affetti di molti di coloro che incontrava.

Anche Dante Medina, poeta e critico messicano, ricorda l’amico e ne tesse una laudatio passando in rassegna diverse liriche, cercando in esse la lingua degli angeli, come dice esplicitamente. Riprende anche lui la parola invel (in nessun luogo) diventato simbolo dello spaesamento, ma riesce a darci anche un’immagine della complessità e della densità di Nadiani poeta: “È difficile spiegare la ruvidezza terrena nella tenerezza dei versi di Giovanni Nadiani. Le sue parole tagliano come coltelli, ma hanno petali; sanguinano, ma profumano; feriscono come il piacere amato” (Lo difícil es explicar la rudeza terrenal en la ternura de los versos de Giovanni Nadiani. Cortan como cuchillos, pero tienen pétalos; sangran, pero perfuman; hieren como el placer amado…)

Matthias Politycki, poeta e scrittore tedesco, continua sulla linea del ricordo dell’amico e traduttore, che aveva volto in italiano alcune sue liriche. Tra cui una sulla corsa. E la maratona è al centro del suo intervento. Ricordando così Giovanni maratoneta, la sua tenacia, che lo aveva aiutato nelle fasi più difficili della vita. E Politycki racconta come lui corresse la maratona anche per l’amico malato, finché un crollo fisico e psicologico lo costringe alla resa durante una competizione, mentre l’amico soffriva in ospedale per la corsa della sua vita. La poesia, in questo caso, diventa affettuoso racconto di empatia.

Ai poeti si aggiungono l’irlandese William Wall, quindi Nevio Spadoni che pubblicò il suo primo testo  grazie all’incoraggiamento dell’amico Giovanni e infine Michele Zizzarri che ci dà un saggio straordinario di traduzione in napoletano di liriche di Nadiani, a testimonianza della fecondità e dell’importanza dell’interscambio di esperienze tra dialetti.

Chiude, idealmente questa sezione, l’intervento di Christian Wehlte, collega di Nadiani nella sezione di tedesco del Dipartimento di Interpretazione e Traduzione che ricorda l’incontro tra lui, ricercatore del nord della Germania e Nadiani, un po’ folletto e poeta italiano che aveva tradotto proprio i poeti della sua regione e della sua ‘parlata’, il basso tedesco. Un incontro fatto di acuta osservazione, in cui Giovanni viene ritratto nella passione che aveva per il lavoro, per i suoi studenti e per quello che insegnava: tradurre.

C’è un libro importante di Giovanni Nadiani  che raccoglie i suoi principali interventi critici e da studioso, Un deserto tutto per se. Il titolo era ripreso da una nota di Deleuze e Guattari che commentavano l’importanza, per gli scrittori di comunità linguistiche minoritarie, di scrivere nella loro lingua, “Scrivere come un cane che fa il suo buco, come un topo che scava la sua tana. E, a tal fine, trovare il proprio punto di sotto-sviluppo, un proprio dialetto, un terzo mondo, un deserto tutto per sé.” Questo deserto è il luogo della solitudine, perché ormai il tuo dialetto non lo capisce e non lo parla quasi nessuno, e resti tu, solo. Giovanni se ci ha lasciato qualcosa è anche questa consapevolezza, un deserto tutto per noi.

E nella parte finale dell’happening in sua memoria davanti al Museo di San Domenico,  nel 2017, avevamo voluto far risuonare lo spirito che esce da queste parole di Giovanni Nadiani: “Ciò comporta, come afferma lo scrittore creolo, Édouard Glissant, che si abbandoni il monolinguismo, l’altro grande feticcio del maggiore, che si parli e scriva in presenza di tutte le lingue del mondo.”

Ispirandoci a lui abbiamo deciso di tradurre la sua toccante poesia Ciò nonostante, tratta dalla raccolta Ridente town, in alcune delle lingue presenti nel suo Dipartimento di Traduzione a Forlì, ovvero  in bulgaro, ceco, cinese, francese, giapponese, inglese, portoghese, russo, slovacco, tedesco.

Quelle traduzioni, lette allora sul palco dai rispettivi autori, sono ora raccolte nella Seconda sezione di questo numero monografico di Intralinea. I traduttori sono tutti colleghi di Nadiani, che lo hanno apprezzato e amato sul lavoro, e questo è il loro saluto, quel at salut  così importante nelle lingue minori, nei dialetti, nelle campagne del mondo.

La terza e ultima sezione cerca di dare un’immagine di Nadiani come uomo di spettacolo. E’ stato uno dei coautori della riscrittura di Re Lear in romagnolo, una rivisitazione del dramma elisabettiano con vicende della riviera, tra un ex albergatore caduto in disgrazia e le sue figlie che, tranne una, gli portano via tutto, mentre lui si riduce a barbone. E’ la vicenda di LEARdo e’ RE, scritto a tre mani da Mantegazza, Nadiani e Pizzol e messo in scena dallo stesso Pizzol, un brano di repertorio che vive tutt’ora sui palcosccenici italiani, oltre Imola, Rimini e il ravennate. L’intervento di Pizzol nella terza sezione di questo speciale ricostruisce la genesi ma anche la portata di questo Shakespeare in lingua romagnola.

Infine, non poteva mancare un omaggio musicale che costiuisce un coronamento e anche una sintesi di tutto quello che ho cercato di presentare. Chris Rundle presenta la sua lunga collaborazione con Giovanni Nadiani in ambito blues. Ricorda gli spettacoli in cui si sono esibiti insieme alla sua band, ma ricorda anche l’intreccio e la polivocità di quella collaborazione: il musicista che prende spunto dalla lirica del poeta e ne fa una nuova canzone in inglese, e il poeta che, oltre a salire sulla scena con lui, ritraduce il pezzo blues nella sua lingua. Alla fine il lettore può ascoltare uno dei brani che Rundle ha composto, ispirandosi alla poesia di Giovanni “Arzir”: Johnny’s Blues. Che diventa produzione circolare di testi che si generano a vicenda, lingue che combaciano o divergono, si allontanano e ritornano.

Note

[1] Si vedano le tre Special Issue pubblicate su inTRAlinea che sono frutto di questo progetto: Marano, Nadiani & Rundle (2009); Nadiani & Rundle (2012); Brenner & Helin (2016).

About the author(s)

Roberto Menin è Professore ordinario di Lingua e traduzione tedesca presso il Dipartimento di Interpretazione e Traduzione dell’Università di Bologna (sede di Forlì). Traduttore di testi di drammaturgia contemporanea di area tedesca si è occupato di traduzione e linguistica testuale.

Email: [please login or register to view author's email address]

©inTRAlinea & Roberto Menin (2019).
"Un deserto tutto per noi"
inTRAlinea Commemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna Sky
Edited by: Roberto Menin, Gloria Bazzocchi & Chris Rundle
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2455

Il dialetto di Giovanni Nadiani

By Davide Argnani

©inTRAlinea & Davide Argnani (2019).
"Il dialetto di Giovanni Nadiani"
inTRAlinea Commemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna Sky
Edited by: Roberto Menin, Gloria Bazzocchi & Chris Rundle
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2453

La foto di Giovanni Nadiani (di Valerio Tisselli) risale al 14/11/2015
in occasione di un incontro in Biblioteca A. Saffi di Forlì
a cura del Centro Culturale L’Ortica di Forlì

Giovanni Nadiani
a vajon

(i treno ch’u s’perd
i è sempar in ureri
e u s’toca d’aspitê
cvi ch’a ciapen)

andè sò e zò
par la stesa strê
par tot e’ dè zarchê
cla parôla şmenga
e farmês in ti cruşiri
a sintir e’ vent dal machin…
smaghé
da un pont spudêr int l’acva trovda,
insen al brustulin biasê al biastem
s-ciazend e vut di’ gos,
e pu
tra e’ lom e e’ scur
truvês ad chev d’un viol şmarì tra al siv
cun al şbar impet…

…gvardêr insò,
ad là de’ zet,
la zirandla…
 

A Zonzo: (i treni che si perdono/sono sempre in orario/e ci tocca attendere/quelli che prendiamo)/camminare su e giù/per la stessa strada,/per tutto il giorno cercare/quella parola scordata/e fermarsi agli incroci/a sentire il vento delle macchine/disgustati/da un ponte sputare nell’acqua torbida,/coi semi di zucca masticare le bestemmie/schiacciando il vuoto delle bucce,/e poi/all’imbrunire/trovarsi in fondo ad un viottolo smarrito tra le siepi/con le sbarre dirimpetto…/…guardare insù,/oltre il silenzio,/i fuochi d’artificio…

A ‘zonzo’ o ‘a vajon’, come si diceva una volta nelle nostre campagne, significava andare in giro alla scoperta del mondo lungo le carraie, o agli incroci delle strade polverose dei piccoli paesi, fermandosi a fare quattro chiacchiere con chi si incontrava in un confronto civile con gli altri. Mi piace riportare questa poesia “a vajon”[1] di Giovanni proprio perché in questi versi ci sento il travaglio di un ‘viaggio esistenziale-immaginario’ di una vita con tutto il simbolismo, l’ironia e la visione di un poeta dalla parola multietnica offrendo al proprio fruitore grandi vibrazioni e scuotendone l’abulia di rassegnato lettore perché, come annotavano i fratelli Grimm: “I Dialetti posseggono calore vitale, e non il calore dell’erudizione…”. E allora la Lingua Romagnola è ancora viva? Nella Lingua dei poeti possiamo dire subito di sì. Pensando a Giovanni Nadiani fin dal suo primo libro E’ sèch (del 1989), il dialetto, anche se oggi non si parla quasi più e tutto è cambiato, rimane  ben vivo grazie ai numerosi e ottimi scrittori e poeti dialettofoni non solo romagnoli, e Giovanni Nadiani con il suo dialetto di Cassanigo di Cotignola ha saputo ben coglierne i cambiamenti con determinata passione e conoscenza, per cui la lingua del luogo diventa la lingua dei nomadi o lingua bastarda o dello ‘spaesamento’ in un mondo ormai globalizzato con un vasto mescolio di diversi idiomi. Quella di Nadiani è dunque una voce nuova e originale, una “voce critica”, non  implicata, come dimostra tutta la sua opera, nei pruriti del localismo più spicciolo, avvalendosi anche di  lingue lontane dalle nostre, come il tedesco, il fiammingo e di altri elementi quali la musica rock, il jazz, il teatro, ma senza mai dissociarsi dalle proprie origini.

L’originalità del Nadiani-Poeta prende le mosse anche da una necessità primaria di anti idillio perché nel suo dialetto di Cotignola egli fa da sempre confluire tutte le tensioni di una realtà degradata e contradditoria: quella del nostro presente globalizzato pieno di infamie antropologiche non meno che politiche, oltre che di futilità commerciali e pseudo-economiche, osservate dalla prospettiva marginale di una provincia assimilata con velocità sempre più vertiginosa ai vizi e ai vezzi di un Occidente allo sbando, deserto di memoria e di punti di riferimento.

Giovanni Nadiani è un poeta che ha fatto del proprio dialetto un fertile laboratorio di ricerca linguistica nel quale unisce alle forme espressive del vernacolo la felicissima vena di un linguaggio atavico unito a soluzioni inedite là dove l’autore abbassa il suo dire, quello della vita quotidiana, mescolandolo con la vocazione più lirica, tipica dei vecchi autori romagnoli ma secondo il principio della ricerca e di uno sperimentalismo linguistico nuovi. E come dice Alberto Bertoni nella sua prefazione all’opera: ANmarcurd? (Non mi ricordo, Ed. L’Arcolaio, Forlì 2015): “La lingua romagnola diviene nel suo solfeggio esperto e appassionato lo strumento poetico ideale a rappresentare faglie e ferite aperte fra vita personale del soggetto e vita collettiva della comunità entro la quale il poeta si muove e che per assurdo rimanda a Beckett e dall’altra al santarcangiolese Raffaello Baldini”. Allora anche per questo si può dire che Giovanni Nadiani è l’interprete più ragguardevole della generazione nata negli anni cinquanta, dopo Raffaello Baldini, Nino Pedretti, Tonino Guerra, Gianni Fucci, Giuliana Rocchi. Insomma il dialetto di Giovanni Nadiani è lontano da ogni nostalgia e da ogni  sentimentalismo, distinguendosi per la sua forza critica e trasgressiva e di ampio respiro civile e sociale senza mai scadere nella retorica.

[1] Poesia pubblicata sul n. 12 della rivista Diverse lingue, Edizioni Campanotto-Udine – ottobre 1993 diretta da Amedeo Giacomini: uno fra i più noti poeti dialettali veneti, purtroppo scomparso da tempo.

About the author(s)

Davide Argnani, poeta e critico, è nato il 4 giugno 1939 a S. Maria Nuova di Bertinoro (FC). Dal 1953 vive e lavora a Forlì. Negli anni settanta-ottanta ha partecipato a numerose mostre e rassegne di poesia-visiva in Italia e all’estero. Sue opere sono riprodotte in molti cataloghi d’arte visiva e sono presenti in numerosi musei e centri di documentazione d’arte multimediale in Italia e all’estero. Ha collaborato e collabora a varie riviste letterarie; dal 1999 è condirettore della rivista Confini, di Cesena (Fc), e collabora alla pagina culturale del ‘Corriere di Romagna’. Nel 1979 a Forlì ha fondato il Centro Culturale ‘Nuovo Ruolo’ per la poesia e, dopo il suo scioglimento, nel 1991 ha fondato, insieme a un gruppo di poeti e artisti, il Centro Culturale ‘L’Ortica’ per la poesia, l’arte e la letteratura, tuttora in piena attività.

Email: [please login or register to view author's email address]

©inTRAlinea & Davide Argnani (2019).
"Il dialetto di Giovanni Nadiani"
inTRAlinea Commemorative Issue: Beyond the Romagna Sky
Edited by: Roberto Menin, Gloria Bazzocchi & Chris Rundle
This article can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/specials/article/2453