Arash the Archer

Translated by: Abbas Mehrpooya (Islamic Azad University, Hamedan Branch, Iran)

آرش کمانگیر، سروده¬ی سیاوش کسرایی / by Siavash Kasra'i
Kasra’i, Siavash (2005) Āraŝ-e Kamāngīr/Arash-e Kamangir, Ketab-e Nader Publishing. Tehran, Iran.


It is snowing;
It snows on thorns and thorn-stones.
[1]
The mountains silent,
The vales heavy in heart;
The paths longing for a caravan with tinkling bells …
If smoke billows not from the roofs of huts,
If light glimmers not a message to us,
Nor footmarks were made on the slippery road,
What could we do in the snowstorm howling its disheartening cold?
There-there a lighted hut,
On the hill beyond!

The door they opened.
Kindness they showed.
Soon I knew Amoo Nowruz,
Away from the wrathful story of snow and nip,
[2]
By the fire flames,
Tells a tale to his children:

“...I told you life is beautiful.
Told and untold, there’ is a lot here.
The clear sky;
The golden sun;
The flower gardens;
The boundless plains;

The flowers peeping up through the snow;
The tender swing of fish dancing in crystal of water;
The scent of rain-swept dust on the mountainside;
The sleep of wheat fields in the spring of moonlight;
To come, to go, to run;
To love;
To lament for man;
And to revel arm in arm with the crowd’s joys;

To work and work;
To rest;
To behold the sight of the dry thirsty deserts;
To drink a sip of pure water from the fresh jar;

To shepherd the sheep to the mountain at dawn;
To chorus with the straying mountain nightingales;
To feed the trapped baby gazelles;
To take refuge in the vale at weary midday;

From time to time,
From the raindrops,
To hear the tangled tales of woe under the hazy roofs of clay;
And over the roof see
The steady rainbow cradle;

Or to sit by the fire flames,
On the snowy night,
And give heart to the fire’s warm, lapping dreams …
Yea, yea, life is beautiful,
Life’s a timeless fireplace everlasting.
If you light it, its flames from coast to coast shall plainly dance.
If not, it shall die down
And that’s but our sin.”

The old man serenely smiling,
Threw a log into the dying fire.
His eyes searched the blackness of the hut;
And these words he quietly whispered:

“Life must have burning flames;
The flames must have firewood to burn.

A forest you are! O man!

Forest, O freely grown,
Your lap you generously lay on the mountainsides,
The nests on your fingertips forever rest,
The streams in your shadows flow,
Over you the sunlight shines,
The wind blows,
And the rain falls,
Your soul, the fire’s servant...
Be lofty and green, O forest of man!”

“Life wants flames” Amoo Nowruz thundered,
“The flames must have firewood to light.
My children, our story was of Arash.
He was the soulful servant of the fire garden.

There was a time;
A dark and bitter time.
Our fates dim as the faces of our ill-wishers.
Foes ruling our lives
The battered land was raving;
So many sad stories it had on its tongue.
Life was as dark and cold as rocks;
A day of disgrace,
A time of shame.

Zeal in the shackles of slavery bound;
Love from the pain of melancholy numb.

The seasons all had turned to winter,
The scene of garden strolls was lost,
Into their chambers all crept.
From the flowers of the minds,
Into the chambers of silence
The scent of oblivion flowed.

Fear it was and the wings of death;
Like leaves on tree limbs,
None moved.
The freemen’s den was lulled;
The foes’ fronts all astir.

Like the unbound frontiers of the mind,
The land’s borders were upset.
The town’s towers,
Ruined, as torn to the ground were the citadels of the heart.
And over the frontiers and turrets had passed the foes...

No breast held hate.
Nor heart bore love.
None to a soul gave a hand.
None at another face did smile.

The gardens of hope were leafless;
The sky of tears was all a-rain.
Zealous freemen in chains;
Whorish fiends held the reins …     (107)

Foes held councils,
Advisors they gathered;
To beat us by our own hand
A plan they conceived in their ill heart.
Their wily minds shameless,
May they see no happy day,
At last, found the charm they sought...

Eyes fearfully strayed here and there in their sockets;
And all mouths whispered this news to an ear:
“Such is the last command,
The last word of disdain...
An arrow flight the far frontier shall tame!
If it lands nigh,
Our home is tight
Our hope is blind...
If it flies far,
To where? … till when ? …
Ah! Where’s an iron arm, the hand of faith?”

Each mouth related this news;
Did the eyes with no word each side search.

The old man sadly rubbed hand on hand.
From the far vales, a weary wolf howled.
The snow falling on snow.
The wind rubbing his wing on window.

“Morn was coming,” –The old man quietly went on
“Before the foe’s troops the friend’s army,
Not a plain, but a sea of soldiers ...

The sky had lost its diamond stars.     (136)
The dark’s breath choked in the mouth of morn;
The wind moulted on the open plains skirting Alborz.
 
Iran’s army was in a fiercely painful worry,
Whispering they teamed up in twos, in threes …
Children on roofs;
Girls sitting at windows,
Mothers sad by doors.

The muted murmur it rose to a crescendo.
The people, like a disturbed sea,
Came to rage;
Turned to roar;
Fell to waves;
Cleaved its chest like a shell
And did a man it bear forth.”

“Arash am I,
So began the man facing the foe;
Arash am I, a free warrior,
Armed with the only arrow in my quiver
All ready to take your bitter trial.

Seek not my roots,
Son of toil and torment am I;

As a meteor that flees the night,
As rising sun that shines alight.

Hallowed be the armor worn in war;
Blessed be the wine they drink in triumph.
Hallowed and blessed your armor and wine!

My heart I hold in hand
And clutch it tight,
The heart, the vengeful cup of blood;
The heart, the restless, the wrath-toned...

May I in a feast drink to your triumph;
May I in a fight clink to the cup of your heart!
For the cup of hatred is of stone.
In our feast, in our fight, stone and jar are at war.

In this battle,
In this trial,
It’s the heart of a people in my hand;
And the hope of a silent people, my helper.

The arc of the heavens in my hand
The bowman am I, the archer.
The swift-winged meteor;
The lofty crest of mountain, my haven;
The early-rising sun’s eye is my den.
Fire the feather of my arrow;
And the Wind is my servant.

Yet,
Today the cure shall not be the might and valor.
Freedom may not be by iron body and youth power.
In this field,
On this very life-taking and home-making arrow,     (187)
A feather of life shall be to fly with no rest.”

Then he turned his head heavenward,
And in an altered tone yelled out words of else:

“Salute, O Last morn! Farewell, O Dawn!
For it’s your last sight of Arash.
I swear to true morn!
I swear to the veiled sun, the pure-eyed, the love-raining!
Arash his life in the arrow shall fly,
And fast he shall fall.

The earth knows this, so do the heavens,
That my flesh is flawless and pure my soul.
Not a trick, nor a charm in my work dwells;
No fear in my mind, nor dread in my heart’s lair.”

He stopped then and said no word awhile.
Breaths in chests were restless.

“Before me Death,
Wearing a fearsome mask lumbers forth.
At each dreadful step,
Bloodily he eyes me up.
On the vultures’ wings he hangs over me,
He lingers and looms ahead;
And deadly cold laughs at me;
There resounds in the mounts and vales,
A baneful sneer he yells at me,
He then claims it back anew.

My heart loathes Death;
For the evil Death is flesh-consuming.
Yet, once the life’s soul is dimmed by pains;
When good and evil are at war;
It is sweet to go into the mouth of death.
It is all that freedom shall want.

Thousands of telling eyes ‘n’ silent lips
Know me their herald of hope.
Thousands of trembling hands and thrilling hearts
Bar me now and push me forth then.

With human charms I adorn my heart and soul.
And I tread forth.
And by all power life has in eyes and smiles,
I the fearful face of death shall unveil.”

He knelt in prayer,
Holding up his hands towards the peaks:
“Rise, O Sun, O provision of Hope!
Rise, O vines of Sunlight!
The flowing spring you are, thirsty and restless am I.
Rise and fill the soul to the rim ‘til it quenched shall be.

As I’ve got my foot in the mouth of ireful Death,
As in my heart I‘ve got a fight with the war-lusted evil,
I wish to bathe in your sea of light;
I seek the scent and hue in your petals, O golden Flower!

Yea, O the rebel peaks of silence,
Who scrape your forehead against the dreadful thunders,
And overlook the dreamy view of the porch of night,
who ram the silvery pillars of gilded day on your shoulder,
And shelter the fiery clouds;
Be lofty and proud!
My hope, let it rise,
As flags of dawn breeze over your ridge.
Save my pride,
As the leopards you hold in your rocky side.”

The earth still and the sky silent was.
As if the world were all ears to hear Arash’s words.
The sun’s paw slowly slid down the mountains’ mane.
And flew a thousand spears of gold at the sky’s eye.

Arash calmly threw a look at the land beyond.
Children on roofs;
Girls at windows;
Mothers sad by doors;
Men on roads.
The song of no word with a heart-rending sorrow,
From eyes soared up on the morning breeze.
What song can sing,
What melody can play,
The resounding rhythm of the firm steps
Manly taken towards doom?
The refrain of steps taken surely forward?

His foes in a mocking silence gave way.
The children on roofs called his name.
Mothers for him prayed.
The old men turned their eyes.
Girls, clutching their necklaces,
Sent him power of love and loyalty.

Arash, yet silent,
Mounted up the Alborz side.
And did veils of tears ceaselessly after him drop.”

Closed his eyes a wink Amoo Nowruz,
His lips smiling, he was drowned in dreams.
Children with weary querying eyes,
Were in wonder at the bravery.
Flames in the furnace were flying,
Wind was roaring.

“At night,
The trackers who traced Arash up on the peaks,
Climbed down
Bearing no sign of him,
Save a bow, and an empty quiver.

Yea, yea,
Arash did his life with the souring arrow fly.
He did the work of hundreds of hundred thousand swords.

The arrow of Arash
The horsemen who rode along Jeyhun,[3]
The noon after that day,
Saw landed on a great walnut bough.
And there ever after,
Border of Iran and Turan they called.[4]

Sunlight,
In her slow fleeing,
For years strolling passed over the roof of world.

Moonlight,
Her nightly journeys all in vain,
In the heart of every land and lane,
Silently peeked into each porch and doorway.
Sun and moon in flight
Many years passed.
For years and again,
On all the vastness of Alborz,
All the doleful dumb peak there you see,
And in those snow-swept vales you know,
The helpless wayfarers lost at night
In heart of the mountains call Arash over and over,
And seek their needs.

By the mouths of the stones on the mountain
Arash answers.
Helps them know the rise and fall of paths;
Gives them hope,
Shows them the way.”

It’s snowing outside the hut.
It snows on thorns and thorn-stones;
The mountains silent,
The vales heavy in heart;
The paths longing for a caravan with tinkling bells …
It’s long the children have gone to sleep,
Amoo Nowruz is asleep, too.
I put a log in the fireplace.
The flame flies up fiery...

Saturday, March 14, 1959

Notes

[1] Regarding the lexical innovation thorn-stone (khäräsang: khär + ä + sang: khär/thorn/خار + sang/stone/سنگ), an old yet inventive example of applying a similar constructive pattern to create a relationship of equivalence in translation can be found between Persian and German wherein the Persian ‘خرمالو’ (khoromäloo: khoromä + älu: date/khoromä/خرما + plume/älu/آلو) and the German dattelpflaume (date/dattel + plume/pflaume) both meaning persimmon are placed in a relationship of lexical equivalence, as provided in the Faramarz Behzad’s Deutsch-Persisches Wörterbuch (2012).

[2] In Persian Culture, Amoo Nowruz, meaning Uncle Nowruz, is responsible for giving gifts to children. He makes their wishes come true and ensures that they are happy and healthy for many years to come. (See: Persian Mirror, 2004, ©2004 PersianMirror, Inc., http://www.persianmirror.com)

[3] According to DehKhoda Encyclopedia of Persian Language, Jeyhun River was the border between Khorasan and Transoxiana, Amuy near Balkh. Dr. Mansur Rastegar Fasaie quotes Tabari in his Dictionary of Shahnemé’s Names that Jeyhun River was called ‘the stream of Balkh’ which was the border between Iran and Turan (DehKhoda 1998).

[4] According to DehKhoda Encyclopedia of Persian Language, Turan was the name of the land of Transoxiana, beyond Amuy, which was the kingdom of Tur, Fereydoon’s eldest son, and named after him (DehKhoda 1998).

برف می بارد؛

برف می بارد به روی خار و خاراسنگ.
کوهها خاموش،
دره ها دلتنگ؛
راه ها چشم انتظار کاروانی با صدای زنگ...

بر نمی شد گر ز بام کلبه ها دودی،
یا که سوسوی چراغی گر پیامی­مان نمی­آورد،
رد پاها گر نمی­افتاد روی جاده­ها لغزان،
ما چه می کردیم در کولاک دل آشفته­ی دمسرد؟
آنک ،آنک کلبه­ای روشن،
روی تپه، روبروی من...

در گشودندم.
مهربانی­ها نمودندم.
زود دانستم، که دور از داستان خشمِ برف و سوز،
در کنار شعله­ی آتش،
قصه می­گوید برای بچه­های خود عمو نوروز:

«...گفته بودم زندگی زیباست.

گفته و ناگفته، ای بس نکته­ها کاینجاست.
آسمانِ باز؛
آفتابِ زر؛
باغ هایِ گل؛
دشت­های بی در و پیکر؛

سر برون آوردن گل از درون برف؛
تابِ نرمِ رقصِ ماهی در بلورِ آب؛
بویِ خاکِ عطرِ باران خورده در کهسار؛
خوابِ گندمزارها در چشمه­ی مهتاب؛
آمدن، رفتن، دویدن؛
عشق ورزیدن؛
در غمِ انسان نشستن؛
پا به پای شادمانی­های مردم پای کوبیدن؛

کار کردن، کار کردن؛
آرمیدن؛
چشم­انداز بیابانهای خشک و تشنه را دیدن؛
جرعه­هایی از سبویِ تازه آبِ پاک نوشیدن؛

گوسفندان را سحرگاهان به سویِ کوه راندن؛
هم­نفس با بلبلانِ کوهیِ آواره خواندن؛
در تله­افتاده­آهوبچگان را شیر دادن؛
نیمروزِ خستگی را در پناهِ دره ماندن؛

گاه گاهی،
زیر سقفِ این سفالین بامهایِ مه­گرفته،
قصه­های دَرهمِ غم را زِ نم نم های باران­ها شنیدن؛
بی تکان گهواره­ی رنگین کمان را
در کنارِ بام دیدن؛

یا، شب برفی،
پیشِ آتش­ها نشستن،
دل به رویاهای دامنگیر و گرم شعله بستن...

آری، آری، زندگی زیباست.
زندگی آتشگهی دیرنده پابرجاست.
گر بیفروزیش، رقصِ شعله­اش در هر کَران پیداست.
وَرنه، خاموش است و خاموشی گناه ماست.»

پیر مرد، آرام و با لبخند،
کُنده­ای در کوره­ی افسرده­جان افکند.
چشم­هایش در سیاهی­های کومه جست و جو می­کرد؛
زیرِ لَب آهسته با خود گفتگو می­کرد:

« زندگی را شعله باید برفروزنده؛

شعله ها را هیمه سوزنده.

جنگلی هستی تو، ای انسان!

جنگل، ای روییده آزاده،
بی دریغ افکنده رویِ کوهها دامن،
آشیان­ها بر سرانگشتانِ تو جاوید،
چشمه­ها در سایبان­های تو جوشنده،
آفتاب و باد و باران بر سرت افشان،
جان تو خدمتگرِ آتش...
سربلند و سبز باش، ای جنگلِ انسان!»

 

« زندگانی شعله می­خواهد »،  صدا سر داد عمو نوروز،
« شعله ها را هیمه باید روشنی­افروز.
کودکانم، داستان ما ز آرش بود.
او به جان خدمتگزار باغِ آتش بود.

روزگاری بود؛
روزگارِ تلخ و تاری بود.
بخت ما چون روی بدخواهانِ ما تیره.
دشمنان بر جانِ ما چیره.
شهر سیلی­خورده هذیان داشت؛
بر زبان بس داستانهای پریشان داشت.
زندگی سرد و سیه چون سنگ؛
روزِ بدنامی،
روزگارِ ننگ.

غیرت اندر بندهایِ بندگی پیچان؛
عشق در بیماریِ دلمردگی بیجان.

فصل­ها فصل زمستان شد،
صحنه­ی گلگشت­ها گم شد، نشستن در شبستان شد.

در شبستان­های خاموشی،
می­تراوید از گل اندیشه­ها عطرِ فراموشی.

ترس بود و بال­هایِ مرگ؛
کس نمی­جنبید، چون بر شاخه برگ از برگ.
سنگرِ آزادگان خاموش؛
خیمه­گاه دشمنان پرجوش.

مرزهای مُلک،
همچو سرحدات دامنگستر ِاندیشه، بی­سامان.
برجهای شهر،
همچو باروهای دل، بشکسته و ویران.
دشمنان بگذشته از سرحد و از بارو...

هیچ سینه کینه­ای در بَر نمی­اندوخت.
هیچ دل مهری نمی­ورزید.
هیچ کس دستی به سوی کس نمی­آورد.
هیچ کس در روی دیگر کس نمی­خندید.

باغ­های آرزو بی­برگ؛
آسمانِ اشک­ها پربار.
گرمرو آزادگان دربند؛
روسپی­نامردمان در کار...

انجمن­ها کرد دشمن،
رایزن­ها گردِ هم آورد دشمن؛
تا به تدبیری که در ناپاک دل دارند،
هم به دستِ ما شکستِ ما براندیشند.
نازک­اندیشانشان، بی شرم،-
که مباداشان دگر روزِ بهی در چشم،-
یافتند آخر فسونی را که می­جستند...

چشم­ها با وحشتی در چشمخانه، هر طرف را جست و جو می کرد؛

وین خبر را هر دهانی زیرِ گوشی بازگو می­کرد:
«آخرین فرمان، آخرین تحقیر...
مرز را پروازِ تیری می­دهد سامان!
گر به نزدیکی فرود آید،
خانه­هامان تنگ
آرزومان کور...
وَر بپَرد دور،
تا کجا ؟... تا چند ؟...
آه!... کو بازوی پولادین و کو سرپنجه­ی ایمان؟»

هر دهانی این خبر را بازگو می­کرد؛
چشم­ها، بی گفت و گویی، هر طرف را جست و جو می­کرد.

پیرمرد، اندوهگین، دستی به دیگر دست می­سایید.
از میانِ دره­های دور، گرگی خسته می نالید.
برف رویِ برف می­بارید.
باد بالش را به پشتِ شیشه می­مالید.

«صبح می­آمد- پیرمرد آرام کرد آغاز،-
«پیش رویِ لشکر دشمن سپاهِ دوست؛ دشت نه، دریایی از سرباز...

آسمان الماس­اخترهای خود را داده بود از دست.
بی­نفس می­شد سیاهی در دهانِ صبح؛
باد پر می­ریخت روی دشتِ بازِ دامنِ البرز.

لشکرِ ایرانیان در اضطرابی سخت دردآور،
دو دو و سه سه به پچ پچ گردِ یکدیگر؛
کودکان بر بام؛
دختران بنشسته بر روزن،
مادران غمگین کنارِ در.

کم کََمک در اوج آمد پچ­پچِ خفته.
خلق، چون بحری بر آشفته،
به جوش آمد؛
خروشان شد؛
به موج افتاد؛
بُرَش بِگرفت ومردی چون صدف
از سینه بیرون داد.»

مَنَم آرش،-
چنین آغاز کرد آن مرد با دشمن؛-
مَنَم آرش، سپاهی­مردی آزاده،
به تنها تیرِ ترکش آزمونِ تلختان را
اینک آماده.

مجوییدم نسب،-
فرزند رنج و کار؛

گریزان چون شهاب از شب،
چو صبح آماده­ی دیدار.

مبارک باد آن جامه که اندر رزم پوشندش؛
گوارا باد آن باده که اندر فتح نوشندش.
شما را باده و جامه
گوارا و مبارک باد!

دلم را در میان دست می­گیرم
و می­اِفشارمش در چنگ،-
دل، این جامِ پر از کینِ پر از خون را؛
دل، این بی تابِ خشم­آهنگ...

که تا نوشم به نامُ فتحتان در بَزم؛
که تا کوبم به جامِ قلبتان در رَزم!
که جام کینه از سنگ است.
به بزمِ ما و رزمِ ما سبو و سنگ را جنگ است.

در این پیکار،
در این کار،
دلِ خلقی است در مشتم؛
امیدِ مردمی خاموش هم پُشتم.

کمانِ کهکشان در دست،
کمانداری کمانگیرم.
شهابِ تیزرو تیرم؛
ستیغِ سر بلند کوه ماوایم؛
به چشم آفتابِ تازه­رس جایم.
مرا تیر است آتش پَر؛
مرا باد است فرمانبر.

و لیکن چاره را امروز زور و پهلوانی نیست.
رهایی با تنِ پولاد و نیروی جوانی نیست.
در این میدان،
بر این پیکان هستی­سوزِ سامان­ساز،
پَری از جان بباید تا فرو ننشیند از پرواز.»

پس آنگه سر به سوی آسمان بَر کرد،
به آهنگی دگر گفتارِ دیگر کرد:

درود، ای واپسین صبح، ای سحر بدرود!
که با آرش ترا این آخرین دیدار خواهد بود.
به صبحِ راستین سوگند!
به پنهان­آفتابِ مهربارِ پاک­بین سوگند!
که آرش جان خود در تیر خواهد کرد،
پس آنگه، بی درنگی خواهدش افکند.

زمین می­داند این را، آسمان­ها نیز،
که تن بی­عیب و جان پاک است.
نه نیرنگی به کارِ من، نه افسونی؛
نه ترسی در سرَم، نه در دلم باک است.»

درنگ آورد و یک دم شد به لب خاموش.
نَفَس در سینه های بی­تاب می­زد جوش.

«ز پیشم مرگ،
نقابی سهمگین بر چهره، می­آید.
به هر گامِ هراس­افکن،
مرا با دیده­ی خونبار می پاید.
به بالِ کرکسان گردِ سرم پرواز می­گیرد،
به راهم می­نشیند، راه می­بندد؛
به رویم سرد می­خندد؛
به کوه و دره می­ریزد طنین زهرخندش را،
و بازش باز می­گیرد.

دلم از مرگ بیزار است؛
که مرگِ اهرمن­خو آدمی­خوار است.
ولی، آن دم که ز اندوهان روانِ زندگی تار است؛
ولی، آن دم که نیکی و بدی را گاه پیکاراست؛
فرو رفتن به کامِ مرگ شیرین است.
همان بایسته­ی آزادگی این است.

هزاران چشمِ گویا و لبِ خاموش
مرا پیکِ امید خویش می­داند.
هزاران دست لرزان و دل پُرجوش
گهی می­گیردم، گه پیش می­راند.

 

پیش می­آیم.
دل و جان را به زیورهای انسانی می آرایم.
به نیرویی که دارد زندگی در چشم و در لبخند،
نقاب از چهره­ی ترس­آفرین مرگ خواهم کَند.»

نیایش را، دو زانو بر زمین بنهاد.
به سوی قله­ها دستان ز هم بگشاد:
برآ، ای آفتاب، ای توشه­ی امید!
برآ، ای خوشه خورشید!
تو جوشان چشمه­ای، من تشنه­ای بی­تاب.
برآ، سر ریز کن، تا جان شود سیراب.

چو پا، در کامِ مرگی تندخو دارم،
چو در دل، جنگ با اهریمنی پرخاش­جو دارم،
به موجِ روشنایی شست و شو خواهم؛
ز گلبرگ تو، ای زرینه­گل، من رنگ و بو خواهم.

شما، ای قله­های سرکشِ خاموش،
که پیشانی به تندرهای سهم­انگیز می­سایید،
که بر ایوانِ شب دارید چشم­انداز رویایی،
که سیمین پایه­های روز زرین را به رویِ شانه می­کوبید،
که ابرِ آتشین را در پناه خویش می­گیرید؛
غرور و سربلندی هم شما را باد!
امیدم را برافرازیید،
چو پرچم­ها که از بادِ سحرگاهان به سر دارید.
غرورم را نگه دارید،
به سان آن پلنگانی که در کوه و کمر دارید.»

«زمین خاموش بود و آسمان خاموش.
تو گویی این جهان را بود با گفتارِ آرش گوش.
به یالِ کوه­ها لغزید کم­کم پنجه­ی خورشید.
هزاران نیزه­ی زرین به چشمِ آسمان پاشید.

«نظر افکند آرش سوی شهر، آرام.
کودکان بر بام؛
دختران بنشسته بر روزن؛
مادران غمگین کنارِ در؛
مردها در راه.
سرودِ بی­کلامی، با غمی جانکاه،
ز چشمان بر همی شد با نسیم صبحدم همراه.
کدامین نغمه می­ریزد،
کدام آهنگ آیا می­تواند ساخت،
طنینِ گام هایِ استواری را که سوی نیستی مردانه می­رفتند؟
طنینِ گامهایی را که آگاهانه می­رفتند؟

دشمنانش، در سکوتی ریشخند­آمیز،
راه وا کردند.
کودکان از بام­ها او را صدا کردند.
مادران او را دعا کردند.
پیرمردان چشم گرداندند.
دختران، بفشُرده گردن­بندها در مُشت،
همرهِ او قدرت عشق و وفا کردند.

آرش، اما همچنان خاموش،
از شکافِ دامنِ البرز بالا رفت.
وز پی او،
پرده های اشک پی در پی فرود آمد.»

بست یک دم چشم­هایش را عمو نوروز،
خنده بر لب، غرقه در رویا.
کودکان، با دیدگانِ خسته و پی­جو،
در شگفت از پهلوانی­ها.
شعله­های کوره در پرواز،
باد در غوغا.

«شامگاهان،
راه­جویانی که می جستند آرش را به روی قله­ها، پی­گیر،
باز گردیدند،
بی نشان از پیکرِ آرش،
با کمان و ترکشی بی­تیر.

آری، آری، جان خود در تیر کرد آرش.
کار صد ها صد هزاران تیغه­ی شمشیر کرد آرش.

تیر آرش را سوارانی که می­راندند بر جیحون،
به دیگر نیمروزی از پیِ آن روز،
نشسته بر تناور ساقِ گردویی فرو دیدند.
و آنجا را، از آن پس،
مرز ایرانشهر و توران بازنامیدند.

 

آفتاب،
درگُریز بی­شتاب خویش،
سالها بر بام دنیا پاکِشان سر زد.

ماهتاب،
بی نصیب از شبروی­هایش، همه خاموش،
در دلِ هر کوی و هر برزن،
سر به هر ایوان و هر در زد.
آفتاب و ماه را در گشت
سال­ها بگذشت.
سال­ها و باز،
در تمام پهنه­ی البرز،
وین سراسر قله­ی مغموم و خاموشی که می­بینید،
وندرون دره­های برف­آلودی که می­دانید،
رهگذرهایی که شب در راه می­مانند
نام آرش را پیاپی در دل کهسار می­خوانند،
و نیاز خویش می خواهند.

با دهانِ سنگ­هایِ کوه آرش می­دهد پاسخ.
می­کندشان از فراز و از نشیب جاده­ها آگاه؛
می­دهد امید،
می­نماید راه.»

در برون کلبه می­بارد.
برف می­بارد به روی خار و خاراسنگ
کوه­ها خاموش،
دره­ها دلتنگ؛
راه­ها چشم انتظارِ کاروانی با صدای زنگ...
کودکان دیری است در خوابند،
در خواب است عمو نوروز.
می­گذارم کنده­ای هیزم در آتشدان.
شعله بالا می­رود پُرسوز...

شنبه 23 اسفند 1337

It is snowing;
It snows on thorns and thorn-stones.
[1]
The mountains silent,
The vales heavy in heart;
The paths longing for a caravan with tinkling bells …
If smoke billows not from the roofs of huts,
If light glimmers not a message to us,
Nor footmarks were made on the slippery road,
What could we do in the snowstorm howling its disheartening cold?
There-there a lighted hut,
On the hill beyond!

The door they opened.
Kindness they showed.
Soon I knew Amoo Nowruz,
Away from the wrathful story of snow and nip,
[2]
By the fire flames,
Tells a tale to his children:

“...I told you life is beautiful.
Told and untold, there’ is a lot here.
The clear sky;
The golden sun;
The flower gardens;
The boundless plains;

The flowers peeping up through the snow;
The tender swing of fish dancing in crystal of water;
The scent of rain-swept dust on the mountainside;
The sleep of wheat fields in the spring of moonlight;
To come, to go, to run;
To love;
To lament for man;
And to revel arm in arm with the crowd’s joys;

To work and work;
To rest;
To behold the sight of the dry thirsty deserts;
To drink a sip of pure water from the fresh jar;

To shepherd the sheep to the mountain at dawn;
To chorus with the straying mountain nightingales;
To feed the trapped baby gazelles;
To take refuge in the vale at weary midday;

From time to time,
From the raindrops,
To hear the tangled tales of woe under the hazy roofs of clay;
And over the roof see
The steady rainbow cradle;

Or to sit by the fire flames,
On the snowy night,
And give heart to the fire’s warm, lapping dreams …
Yea, yea, life is beautiful,
Life’s a timeless fireplace everlasting.
If you light it, its flames from coast to coast shall plainly dance.
If not, it shall die down
And that’s but our sin.”

The old man serenely smiling,
Threw a log into the dying fire.
His eyes searched the blackness of the hut;
And these words he quietly whispered:

“Life must have burning flames;
The flames must have firewood to burn.

A forest you are! O man!

Forest, O freely grown,
Your lap you generously lay on the mountainsides,
The nests on your fingertips forever rest,
The streams in your shadows flow,
Over you the sunlight shines,
The wind blows,
And the rain falls,
Your soul, the fire’s servant...
Be lofty and green, O forest of man!”

“Life wants flames” Amoo Nowruz thundered,
“The flames must have firewood to light.
My children, our story was of Arash.
He was the soulful servant of the fire garden.

There was a time;
A dark and bitter time.
Our fates dim as the faces of our ill-wishers.
Foes ruling our lives
The battered land was raving;
So many sad stories it had on its tongue.
Life was as dark and cold as rocks;
A day of disgrace,
A time of shame.

Zeal in the shackles of slavery bound;
Love from the pain of melancholy numb.

The seasons all had turned to winter,
The scene of garden strolls was lost,
Into their chambers all crept.
From the flowers of the minds,
Into the chambers of silence
The scent of oblivion flowed.

Fear it was and the wings of death;
Like leaves on tree limbs,
None moved.
The freemen’s den was lulled;
The foes’ fronts all astir.

Like the unbound frontiers of the mind,
The land’s borders were upset.
The town’s towers,
Ruined, as torn to the ground were the citadels of the heart.
And over the frontiers and turrets had passed the foes...

No breast held hate.
Nor heart bore love.
None to a soul gave a hand.
None at another face did smile.

The gardens of hope were leafless;
The sky of tears was all a-rain.
Zealous freemen in chains;
Whorish fiends held the reins …     (107)

Foes held councils,
Advisors they gathered;
To beat us by our own hand
A plan they conceived in their ill heart.
Their wily minds shameless,
May they see no happy day,
At last, found the charm they sought...

Eyes fearfully strayed here and there in their sockets;
And all mouths whispered this news to an ear:
“Such is the last command,
The last word of disdain...
An arrow flight the far frontier shall tame!
If it lands nigh,
Our home is tight
Our hope is blind...
If it flies far,
To where? … till when ? …
Ah! Where’s an iron arm, the hand of faith?”

Each mouth related this news;
Did the eyes with no word each side search.

The old man sadly rubbed hand on hand.
From the far vales, a weary wolf howled.
The snow falling on snow.
The wind rubbing his wing on window.

“Morn was coming,” –The old man quietly went on
“Before the foe’s troops the friend’s army,
Not a plain, but a sea of soldiers ...

The sky had lost its diamond stars.     (136)
The dark’s breath choked in the mouth of morn;
The wind moulted on the open plains skirting Alborz.
 
Iran’s army was in a fiercely painful worry,
Whispering they teamed up in twos, in threes …
Children on roofs;
Girls sitting at windows,
Mothers sad by doors.

The muted murmur it rose to a crescendo.
The people, like a disturbed sea,
Came to rage;
Turned to roar;
Fell to waves;
Cleaved its chest like a shell
And did a man it bear forth.”

“Arash am I,
So began the man facing the foe;
Arash am I, a free warrior,
Armed with the only arrow in my quiver
All ready to take your bitter trial.

Seek not my roots,
Son of toil and torment am I;

As a meteor that flees the night,
As rising sun that shines alight.

Hallowed be the armor worn in war;
Blessed be the wine they drink in triumph.
Hallowed and blessed your armor and wine!

My heart I hold in hand
And clutch it tight,
The heart, the vengeful cup of blood;
The heart, the restless, the wrath-toned...

May I in a feast drink to your triumph;
May I in a fight clink to the cup of your heart!
For the cup of hatred is of stone.
In our feast, in our fight, stone and jar are at war.

In this battle,
In this trial,
It’s the heart of a people in my hand;
And the hope of a silent people, my helper.

The arc of the heavens in my hand
The bowman am I, the archer.
The swift-winged meteor;
The lofty crest of mountain, my haven;
The early-rising sun’s eye is my den.
Fire the feather of my arrow;
And the Wind is my servant.

Yet,
Today the cure shall not be the might and valor.
Freedom may not be by iron body and youth power.
In this field,
On this very life-taking and home-making arrow,     (187)
A feather of life shall be to fly with no rest.”

Then he turned his head heavenward,
And in an altered tone yelled out words of else:

“Salute, O Last morn! Farewell, O Dawn!
For it’s your last sight of Arash.
I swear to true morn!
I swear to the veiled sun, the pure-eyed, the love-raining!
Arash his life in the arrow shall fly,
And fast he shall fall.

The earth knows this, so do the heavens,
That my flesh is flawless and pure my soul.
Not a trick, nor a charm in my work dwells;
No fear in my mind, nor dread in my heart’s lair.”

He stopped then and said no word awhile.
Breaths in chests were restless.

“Before me Death,
Wearing a fearsome mask lumbers forth.
At each dreadful step,
Bloodily he eyes me up.
On the vultures’ wings he hangs over me,
He lingers and looms ahead;
And deadly cold laughs at me;
There resounds in the mounts and vales,
A baneful sneer he yells at me,
He then claims it back anew.

My heart loathes Death;
For the evil Death is flesh-consuming.
Yet, once the life’s soul is dimmed by pains;
When good and evil are at war;
It is sweet to go into the mouth of death.
It is all that freedom shall want.

Thousands of telling eyes ‘n’ silent lips
Know me their herald of hope.
Thousands of trembling hands and thrilling hearts
Bar me now and push me forth then.

With human charms I adorn my heart and soul.
And I tread forth.
And by all power life has in eyes and smiles,
I the fearful face of death shall unveil.”

He knelt in prayer,
Holding up his hands towards the peaks:
“Rise, O Sun, O provision of Hope!
Rise, O vines of Sunlight!
The flowing spring you are, thirsty and restless am I.
Rise and fill the soul to the rim ‘til it quenched shall be.

As I’ve got my foot in the mouth of ireful Death,
As in my heart I‘ve got a fight with the war-lusted evil,
I wish to bathe in your sea of light;
I seek the scent and hue in your petals, O golden Flower!

Yea, O the rebel peaks of silence,
Who scrape your forehead against the dreadful thunders,
And overlook the dreamy view of the porch of night,
who ram the silvery pillars of gilded day on your shoulder,
And shelter the fiery clouds;
Be lofty and proud!
My hope, let it rise,
As flags of dawn breeze over your ridge.
Save my pride,
As the leopards you hold in your rocky side.”

The earth still and the sky silent was.
As if the world were all ears to hear Arash’s words.
The sun’s paw slowly slid down the mountains’ mane.
And flew a thousand spears of gold at the sky’s eye.

Arash calmly threw a look at the land beyond.
Children on roofs;
Girls at windows;
Mothers sad by doors;
Men on roads.
The song of no word with a heart-rending sorrow,
From eyes soared up on the morning breeze.
What song can sing,
What melody can play,
The resounding rhythm of the firm steps
Manly taken towards doom?
The refrain of steps taken surely forward?

His foes in a mocking silence gave way.
The children on roofs called his name.
Mothers for him prayed.
The old men turned their eyes.
Girls, clutching their necklaces,
Sent him power of love and loyalty.

Arash, yet silent,
Mounted up the Alborz side.
And did veils of tears ceaselessly after him drop.”

Closed his eyes a wink Amoo Nowruz,
His lips smiling, he was drowned in dreams.
Children with weary querying eyes,
Were in wonder at the bravery.
Flames in the furnace were flying,
Wind was roaring.

“At night,
The trackers who traced Arash up on the peaks,
Climbed down
Bearing no sign of him,
Save a bow, and an empty quiver.

Yea, yea,
Arash did his life with the souring arrow fly.
He did the work of hundreds of hundred thousand swords.

The arrow of Arash
The horsemen who rode along Jeyhun,[3]
The noon after that day,
Saw landed on a great walnut bough.
And there ever after,
Border of Iran and Turan they called.[4]

Sunlight,
In her slow fleeing,
For years strolling passed over the roof of world.

Moonlight,
Her nightly journeys all in vain,
In the heart of every land and lane,
Silently peeked into each porch and doorway.
Sun and moon in flight
Many years passed.
For years and again,
On all the vastness of Alborz,
All the doleful dumb peak there you see,
And in those snow-swept vales you know,
The helpless wayfarers lost at night
In heart of the mountains call Arash over and over,
And seek their needs.

By the mouths of the stones on the mountain
Arash answers.
Helps them know the rise and fall of paths;
Gives them hope,
Shows them the way.”

It’s snowing outside the hut.
It snows on thorns and thorn-stones;
The mountains silent,
The vales heavy in heart;
The paths longing for a caravan with tinkling bells …
It’s long the children have gone to sleep,
Amoo Nowruz is asleep, too.
I put a log in the fireplace.
The flame flies up fiery...

Saturday, March 14, 1959

Notes

[1] Regarding the lexical innovation thorn-stone (khäräsang: khär + ä + sang: khär/thorn/خار + sang/stone/سنگ), an old yet inventive example of applying a similar constructive pattern to create a relationship of equivalence in translation can be found between Persian and German wherein the Persian ‘خرمالو’ (khoromäloo: khoromä + älu: date/khoromä/خرما + plume/älu/آلو) and the German dattelpflaume (date/dattel + plume/pflaume) both meaning persimmon are placed in a relationship of lexical equivalence, as provided in the Faramarz Behzad’s Deutsch-Persisches Wörterbuch (2012).

[2] In Persian Culture, Amoo Nowruz, meaning Uncle Nowruz, is responsible for giving gifts to children. He makes their wishes come true and ensures that they are happy and healthy for many years to come. (See: Persian Mirror, 2004, ©2004 PersianMirror, Inc., http://www.persianmirror.com)

[3] According to DehKhoda Encyclopedia of Persian Language, Jeyhun River was the border between Khorasan and Transoxiana, Amuy near Balkh. Dr. Mansur Rastegar Fasaie quotes Tabari in his Dictionary of Shahnemé’s Names that Jeyhun River was called ‘the stream of Balkh’ which was the border between Iran and Turan (DehKhoda 1998).

[4] According to DehKhoda Encyclopedia of Persian Language, Turan was the name of the land of Transoxiana, beyond Amuy, which was the kingdom of Tur, Fereydoon’s eldest son, and named after him (DehKhoda 1998).

برف می بارد؛

برف می بارد به روی خار و خاراسنگ.
کوهها خاموش،
دره ها دلتنگ؛
راه ها چشم انتظار کاروانی با صدای زنگ...

بر نمی شد گر ز بام کلبه ها دودی،
یا که سوسوی چراغی گر پیامی­مان نمی­آورد،
رد پاها گر نمی­افتاد روی جاده­ها لغزان،
ما چه می کردیم در کولاک دل آشفته­ی دمسرد؟
آنک ،آنک کلبه­ای روشن،
روی تپه، روبروی من...

در گشودندم.
مهربانی­ها نمودندم.
زود دانستم، که دور از داستان خشمِ برف و سوز،
در کنار شعله­ی آتش،
قصه می­گوید برای بچه­های خود عمو نوروز:

«...گفته بودم زندگی زیباست.

گفته و ناگفته، ای بس نکته­ها کاینجاست.
آسمانِ باز؛
آفتابِ زر؛
باغ هایِ گل؛
دشت­های بی در و پیکر؛

سر برون آوردن گل از درون برف؛
تابِ نرمِ رقصِ ماهی در بلورِ آب؛
بویِ خاکِ عطرِ باران خورده در کهسار؛
خوابِ گندمزارها در چشمه­ی مهتاب؛
آمدن، رفتن، دویدن؛
عشق ورزیدن؛
در غمِ انسان نشستن؛
پا به پای شادمانی­های مردم پای کوبیدن؛

کار کردن، کار کردن؛
آرمیدن؛
چشم­انداز بیابانهای خشک و تشنه را دیدن؛
جرعه­هایی از سبویِ تازه آبِ پاک نوشیدن؛

گوسفندان را سحرگاهان به سویِ کوه راندن؛
هم­نفس با بلبلانِ کوهیِ آواره خواندن؛
در تله­افتاده­آهوبچگان را شیر دادن؛
نیمروزِ خستگی را در پناهِ دره ماندن؛

گاه گاهی،
زیر سقفِ این سفالین بامهایِ مه­گرفته،
قصه­های دَرهمِ غم را زِ نم نم های باران­ها شنیدن؛
بی تکان گهواره­ی رنگین کمان را
در کنارِ بام دیدن؛

یا، شب برفی،
پیشِ آتش­ها نشستن،
دل به رویاهای دامنگیر و گرم شعله بستن...

آری، آری، زندگی زیباست.
زندگی آتشگهی دیرنده پابرجاست.
گر بیفروزیش، رقصِ شعله­اش در هر کَران پیداست.
وَرنه، خاموش است و خاموشی گناه ماست.»

پیر مرد، آرام و با لبخند،
کُنده­ای در کوره­ی افسرده­جان افکند.
چشم­هایش در سیاهی­های کومه جست و جو می­کرد؛
زیرِ لَب آهسته با خود گفتگو می­کرد:

« زندگی را شعله باید برفروزنده؛

شعله ها را هیمه سوزنده.

جنگلی هستی تو، ای انسان!

جنگل، ای روییده آزاده،
بی دریغ افکنده رویِ کوهها دامن،
آشیان­ها بر سرانگشتانِ تو جاوید،
چشمه­ها در سایبان­های تو جوشنده،
آفتاب و باد و باران بر سرت افشان،
جان تو خدمتگرِ آتش...
سربلند و سبز باش، ای جنگلِ انسان!»

 

« زندگانی شعله می­خواهد »،  صدا سر داد عمو نوروز،
« شعله ها را هیمه باید روشنی­افروز.
کودکانم، داستان ما ز آرش بود.
او به جان خدمتگزار باغِ آتش بود.

روزگاری بود؛
روزگارِ تلخ و تاری بود.
بخت ما چون روی بدخواهانِ ما تیره.
دشمنان بر جانِ ما چیره.
شهر سیلی­خورده هذیان داشت؛
بر زبان بس داستانهای پریشان داشت.
زندگی سرد و سیه چون سنگ؛
روزِ بدنامی،
روزگارِ ننگ.

غیرت اندر بندهایِ بندگی پیچان؛
عشق در بیماریِ دلمردگی بیجان.

فصل­ها فصل زمستان شد،
صحنه­ی گلگشت­ها گم شد، نشستن در شبستان شد.

در شبستان­های خاموشی،
می­تراوید از گل اندیشه­ها عطرِ فراموشی.

ترس بود و بال­هایِ مرگ؛
کس نمی­جنبید، چون بر شاخه برگ از برگ.
سنگرِ آزادگان خاموش؛
خیمه­گاه دشمنان پرجوش.

مرزهای مُلک،
همچو سرحدات دامنگستر ِاندیشه، بی­سامان.
برجهای شهر،
همچو باروهای دل، بشکسته و ویران.
دشمنان بگذشته از سرحد و از بارو...

هیچ سینه کینه­ای در بَر نمی­اندوخت.
هیچ دل مهری نمی­ورزید.
هیچ کس دستی به سوی کس نمی­آورد.
هیچ کس در روی دیگر کس نمی­خندید.

باغ­های آرزو بی­برگ؛
آسمانِ اشک­ها پربار.
گرمرو آزادگان دربند؛
روسپی­نامردمان در کار...

انجمن­ها کرد دشمن،
رایزن­ها گردِ هم آورد دشمن؛
تا به تدبیری که در ناپاک دل دارند،
هم به دستِ ما شکستِ ما براندیشند.
نازک­اندیشانشان، بی شرم،-
که مباداشان دگر روزِ بهی در چشم،-
یافتند آخر فسونی را که می­جستند...

چشم­ها با وحشتی در چشمخانه، هر طرف را جست و جو می کرد؛

وین خبر را هر دهانی زیرِ گوشی بازگو می­کرد:
«آخرین فرمان، آخرین تحقیر...
مرز را پروازِ تیری می­دهد سامان!
گر به نزدیکی فرود آید،
خانه­هامان تنگ
آرزومان کور...
وَر بپَرد دور،
تا کجا ؟... تا چند ؟...
آه!... کو بازوی پولادین و کو سرپنجه­ی ایمان؟»

هر دهانی این خبر را بازگو می­کرد؛
چشم­ها، بی گفت و گویی، هر طرف را جست و جو می­کرد.

پیرمرد، اندوهگین، دستی به دیگر دست می­سایید.
از میانِ دره­های دور، گرگی خسته می نالید.
برف رویِ برف می­بارید.
باد بالش را به پشتِ شیشه می­مالید.

«صبح می­آمد- پیرمرد آرام کرد آغاز،-
«پیش رویِ لشکر دشمن سپاهِ دوست؛ دشت نه، دریایی از سرباز...

آسمان الماس­اخترهای خود را داده بود از دست.
بی­نفس می­شد سیاهی در دهانِ صبح؛
باد پر می­ریخت روی دشتِ بازِ دامنِ البرز.

لشکرِ ایرانیان در اضطرابی سخت دردآور،
دو دو و سه سه به پچ پچ گردِ یکدیگر؛
کودکان بر بام؛
دختران بنشسته بر روزن،
مادران غمگین کنارِ در.

کم کََمک در اوج آمد پچ­پچِ خفته.
خلق، چون بحری بر آشفته،
به جوش آمد؛
خروشان شد؛
به موج افتاد؛
بُرَش بِگرفت ومردی چون صدف
از سینه بیرون داد.»

مَنَم آرش،-
چنین آغاز کرد آن مرد با دشمن؛-
مَنَم آرش، سپاهی­مردی آزاده،
به تنها تیرِ ترکش آزمونِ تلختان را
اینک آماده.

مجوییدم نسب،-
فرزند رنج و کار؛

گریزان چون شهاب از شب،
چو صبح آماده­ی دیدار.

مبارک باد آن جامه که اندر رزم پوشندش؛
گوارا باد آن باده که اندر فتح نوشندش.
شما را باده و جامه
گوارا و مبارک باد!

دلم را در میان دست می­گیرم
و می­اِفشارمش در چنگ،-
دل، این جامِ پر از کینِ پر از خون را؛
دل، این بی تابِ خشم­آهنگ...

که تا نوشم به نامُ فتحتان در بَزم؛
که تا کوبم به جامِ قلبتان در رَزم!
که جام کینه از سنگ است.
به بزمِ ما و رزمِ ما سبو و سنگ را جنگ است.

در این پیکار،
در این کار،
دلِ خلقی است در مشتم؛
امیدِ مردمی خاموش هم پُشتم.

کمانِ کهکشان در دست،
کمانداری کمانگیرم.
شهابِ تیزرو تیرم؛
ستیغِ سر بلند کوه ماوایم؛
به چشم آفتابِ تازه­رس جایم.
مرا تیر است آتش پَر؛
مرا باد است فرمانبر.

و لیکن چاره را امروز زور و پهلوانی نیست.
رهایی با تنِ پولاد و نیروی جوانی نیست.
در این میدان،
بر این پیکان هستی­سوزِ سامان­ساز،
پَری از جان بباید تا فرو ننشیند از پرواز.»

پس آنگه سر به سوی آسمان بَر کرد،
به آهنگی دگر گفتارِ دیگر کرد:

درود، ای واپسین صبح، ای سحر بدرود!
که با آرش ترا این آخرین دیدار خواهد بود.
به صبحِ راستین سوگند!
به پنهان­آفتابِ مهربارِ پاک­بین سوگند!
که آرش جان خود در تیر خواهد کرد،
پس آنگه، بی درنگی خواهدش افکند.

زمین می­داند این را، آسمان­ها نیز،
که تن بی­عیب و جان پاک است.
نه نیرنگی به کارِ من، نه افسونی؛
نه ترسی در سرَم، نه در دلم باک است.»

درنگ آورد و یک دم شد به لب خاموش.
نَفَس در سینه های بی­تاب می­زد جوش.

«ز پیشم مرگ،
نقابی سهمگین بر چهره، می­آید.
به هر گامِ هراس­افکن،
مرا با دیده­ی خونبار می پاید.
به بالِ کرکسان گردِ سرم پرواز می­گیرد،
به راهم می­نشیند، راه می­بندد؛
به رویم سرد می­خندد؛
به کوه و دره می­ریزد طنین زهرخندش را،
و بازش باز می­گیرد.

دلم از مرگ بیزار است؛
که مرگِ اهرمن­خو آدمی­خوار است.
ولی، آن دم که ز اندوهان روانِ زندگی تار است؛
ولی، آن دم که نیکی و بدی را گاه پیکاراست؛
فرو رفتن به کامِ مرگ شیرین است.
همان بایسته­ی آزادگی این است.

هزاران چشمِ گویا و لبِ خاموش
مرا پیکِ امید خویش می­داند.
هزاران دست لرزان و دل پُرجوش
گهی می­گیردم، گه پیش می­راند.

 

پیش می­آیم.
دل و جان را به زیورهای انسانی می آرایم.
به نیرویی که دارد زندگی در چشم و در لبخند،
نقاب از چهره­ی ترس­آفرین مرگ خواهم کَند.»

نیایش را، دو زانو بر زمین بنهاد.
به سوی قله­ها دستان ز هم بگشاد:
برآ، ای آفتاب، ای توشه­ی امید!
برآ، ای خوشه خورشید!
تو جوشان چشمه­ای، من تشنه­ای بی­تاب.
برآ، سر ریز کن، تا جان شود سیراب.

چو پا، در کامِ مرگی تندخو دارم،
چو در دل، جنگ با اهریمنی پرخاش­جو دارم،
به موجِ روشنایی شست و شو خواهم؛
ز گلبرگ تو، ای زرینه­گل، من رنگ و بو خواهم.

شما، ای قله­های سرکشِ خاموش،
که پیشانی به تندرهای سهم­انگیز می­سایید،
که بر ایوانِ شب دارید چشم­انداز رویایی،
که سیمین پایه­های روز زرین را به رویِ شانه می­کوبید،
که ابرِ آتشین را در پناه خویش می­گیرید؛
غرور و سربلندی هم شما را باد!
امیدم را برافرازیید،
چو پرچم­ها که از بادِ سحرگاهان به سر دارید.
غرورم را نگه دارید،
به سان آن پلنگانی که در کوه و کمر دارید.»

«زمین خاموش بود و آسمان خاموش.
تو گویی این جهان را بود با گفتارِ آرش گوش.
به یالِ کوه­ها لغزید کم­کم پنجه­ی خورشید.
هزاران نیزه­ی زرین به چشمِ آسمان پاشید.

«نظر افکند آرش سوی شهر، آرام.
کودکان بر بام؛
دختران بنشسته بر روزن؛
مادران غمگین کنارِ در؛
مردها در راه.
سرودِ بی­کلامی، با غمی جانکاه،
ز چشمان بر همی شد با نسیم صبحدم همراه.
کدامین نغمه می­ریزد،
کدام آهنگ آیا می­تواند ساخت،
طنینِ گام هایِ استواری را که سوی نیستی مردانه می­رفتند؟
طنینِ گامهایی را که آگاهانه می­رفتند؟

دشمنانش، در سکوتی ریشخند­آمیز،
راه وا کردند.
کودکان از بام­ها او را صدا کردند.
مادران او را دعا کردند.
پیرمردان چشم گرداندند.
دختران، بفشُرده گردن­بندها در مُشت،
همرهِ او قدرت عشق و وفا کردند.

آرش، اما همچنان خاموش،
از شکافِ دامنِ البرز بالا رفت.
وز پی او،
پرده های اشک پی در پی فرود آمد.»

بست یک دم چشم­هایش را عمو نوروز،
خنده بر لب، غرقه در رویا.
کودکان، با دیدگانِ خسته و پی­جو،
در شگفت از پهلوانی­ها.
شعله­های کوره در پرواز،
باد در غوغا.

«شامگاهان،
راه­جویانی که می جستند آرش را به روی قله­ها، پی­گیر،
باز گردیدند،
بی نشان از پیکرِ آرش،
با کمان و ترکشی بی­تیر.

آری، آری، جان خود در تیر کرد آرش.
کار صد ها صد هزاران تیغه­ی شمشیر کرد آرش.

تیر آرش را سوارانی که می­راندند بر جیحون،
به دیگر نیمروزی از پیِ آن روز،
نشسته بر تناور ساقِ گردویی فرو دیدند.
و آنجا را، از آن پس،
مرز ایرانشهر و توران بازنامیدند.

 

آفتاب،
درگُریز بی­شتاب خویش،
سالها بر بام دنیا پاکِشان سر زد.

ماهتاب،
بی نصیب از شبروی­هایش، همه خاموش،
در دلِ هر کوی و هر برزن،
سر به هر ایوان و هر در زد.
آفتاب و ماه را در گشت
سال­ها بگذشت.
سال­ها و باز،
در تمام پهنه­ی البرز،
وین سراسر قله­ی مغموم و خاموشی که می­بینید،
وندرون دره­های برف­آلودی که می­دانید،
رهگذرهایی که شب در راه می­مانند
نام آرش را پیاپی در دل کهسار می­خوانند،
و نیاز خویش می خواهند.

با دهانِ سنگ­هایِ کوه آرش می­دهد پاسخ.
می­کندشان از فراز و از نشیب جاده­ها آگاه؛
می­دهد امید،
می­نماید راه.»

در برون کلبه می­بارد.
برف می­بارد به روی خار و خاراسنگ
کوه­ها خاموش،
دره­ها دلتنگ؛
راه­ها چشم انتظارِ کاروانی با صدای زنگ...
کودکان دیری است در خوابند،
در خواب است عمو نوروز.
می­گذارم کنده­ای هیزم در آتشدان.
شعله بالا می­رود پُرسوز...

شنبه 23 اسفند 1337

An Arrow Yet to Land.[*] A Commentary on the Poem ‘Arash the Archer’ in Translation

‘Arash, the Archer’ or ‘Āraŝ-e Kamāngīr’ is a poem which has its roots in the age-old Persian legend of ‘Arash-é Shipak-teer’, what can be roughly paraphrased as ‘Arash (of) the Swift Arrow’. The story is first told in the New Avesta, the religious book of Zoroastrians, which most probably dates back to 900 or 800 BC (Boyce 1992). Here is the account of the legend of ‘Āraŝ-e Kamāngīr’, as it appears in the Encyclopedia Iranica (the text is abridged):

His feat occurred in these circumstances: After Afrasyab had surrounded the Pisdadian king, Manucehr, in Tabarestan, both agreed to make peace. Manucehr requested that the Turanian return to him a piece of land the width of a bow-shot, and Afrasyab assented. An angel (in Biruni it is “Esfanddrmad,” i.e., the Beneficent Immortal Spanddrmad) instructed Manucehr to prepare a special bow and arrow; wood, feather, and iron point were taken from a special forest, eagle, and mine (Gorar, p. 133). The skilled archer Araš was commanded to shoot. According to Biruni, Araš displayed himself naked and said: “Behold! my body is free of any wound or sickness; but after this bowshot I will be destroyed.” At dawn he shot and was immediately torn to pieces. (… A later tradition has him survive and become head of the archers…) God commanded the wind to bear the arrow as far as the remote regions of Khorasan, and in this way the boundary between the Iranian and Turanian kingdoms was established.(Tafazzol & Hanaway 1986)

Though the legend of ‘Arash the Archer’ has been re-casted almost equally ingeniously by different Iranian authors in different genres – e.g. the dramatic piece by Bahram Beyzai (1977), the eminent Iranian playwright and movie director, and the classical versified rendition by Mehrdaad Avesta (1996), the modern Persian poet − yet Kasra’i’s version is the one whose seriousness of textual and stylistic matter has appeared to encourage the translator to make an investment of ‘trust’, to use Steiner’s (1975) hermeneutic notion, in favour of rendering a ‘foreign’ translation of it, ‘foreign’ in the sense Berman (1985) had given credence to Heidegger. Arriving at such a conclusion has first and foremost been due to the narratological adherence with which the poet has re-framed the original legend’s main plot while exploiting certain elements of modern narrative-poetry. In the second place, the poet’s attempt at putting to use certain creative features of form and structure has as well appeared to offer a challenge to the translator, what has made the whole endeavor of translating such a literary piece objectivally virtuous. As such, the belief in the fact that there exists “something there” to be comprehended and transferred has appeared to offer sufficient justificatory grounds in favour of finding the labour of transversifying such a long poem all worth it while.

On the Translation

Shunning a translation that ‘reads smoothly’, to use Nabokov’s (1955/2012) phraseology, the translator of the present work has adopted what might be termed a ‘literal approach’ in translation, following Nabokov’s clue that ‘anything but [a literal rendition] is not truly a translation but an imitation, an adaptation or a parody (ibid., p.119). Thus, in rendering a translation of the poem ‘Arash the Archer’, it has been tried to remain as consistent as possible with the original work’s syntactico-semantic content, while trying to keep up as much as possible with the expressive voice of the author and at the same time attempting to make the poetic language of the original as visible in the target rendition. To substantiate such a claim, there follows a brief commentary on three critical points: 

1. To begin with, in line 107, there is the neologistic phrase ‘روسپی نامردمان’ (rüspi-nämærdomän), literally meaning: whorish non-people, which poses another major problem:

O: روسپی نامردمان در کار...

G: … work at non-people whore

T: Whorish fiends held the reins...

O = original
G = gloss
T = Translation

To start, the expression ‘the friendless’, used by P. B. Shelly, as provided by The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (1973) is defined as ‘unfriendly’, what can be perceived to be a translational equivalent for the word ‘نامردمان’ (nä-mardomän), meaning: non-people or non-friends. However, to give a target item which remains more consistent with the original text, perhaps the word ‘unman’, defined in the same dictionary as ‘a being below the status of man’, is found to be more appropriate semantically; what stands in a closer relationship of equivalence with the source word in terms of its semantico-morphological content. Yet, to make a more poetically adequate decision, the equivalent ‘fiend’, defined ibidem as ‘foe’ and ‘an enemy of mankind’, was decided upon for a more fitting poetic import to be permitted in the English rendition, what may well accord with the legendry world of the poem. This way, the existence of similar sound patterns in both fiends and friends – the latter to appear only further in the expression: the friend’s army − turns to more relevantly season the poetic flavor of the ultimate rendition.

2. In line 136, there is also an adjectival phrase where a noun, diamond, modifies another noun  star:

O: آسمان الماس اخترهای خود را داده بود از دست

G: Hand from had-given its stars-of diamond sky

T: The sky had lost its star diamonds.

In such a case, in lieu of an adjective imputing an attribute to a noun, a noun is opted for by the poet which appears to modify another noun. This phenomenon is not rare in Persian literary and everyday discourse, yet seemingly it has been looked into by few, if not no, language scholars. In English, M. L. Larson (1998), appears to bring a similar phenomenon under study by referring to it as lexical skewing. However, in the instances of lexical skewing which Larson provides these are nouns which appear to modify adjectives; while in the Persian case, a noun, a THING at deep-structure level, diamond, appears to be used as an, adjective, an ATTRIBUTE, to modify another noun, star. In the Persian text, such an attributive compound can manifest itself as both diamond stars (stars as diamond) as well as star diamonds (diamonds as star), of which the former has been chosen by the original poet. As it can be seen, there is a change of point of view in choosing the latter where star appears to modify diamond resulting in the conventional choice star diamonds, a construction which is likely to appear to ring more familiarly to an English ear and corresponds with the general proposition: diamonds that shine as star(s). It is while the Persian poet is telling of the stars that shine as diamonds in the dark velvety sky, what paves the ground for a decision in favour of the former case resulting in the novel construction of ‘diamond stars’. Therefore, though the conventional TL construction appears to be more convenient and handy, the point is that equivalence is equivalence and thus it should not be compromised as far as possible. Notwithstanding the fact that such a skewed adjectival phrase can also be de-skewed or paraphrased only to contain a translational modulation, such as starry diamonds, gemmy stars, jeweled stars, brilliant stars etc., it is clear that mere retaining of the skewed pattern ‘diamond stars’ not only guarantees the well-rendered transfer of the message in its original totality, but also attests the latent potential capacity of SL and TL to accommodate the ideal of supra-lexical equivalence.

3. In line 187, the author has created a rhyming pattern between two adjectival items imputing two contrasting attributes to a noun that is the ‘arrow’.

O: بر این پیکان هستی سوز سامان­ساز

G: To make boundary to burn existence arrow this on

T: On this very life-taking and home-making arrow

Here, the mere presence of a formal similarity in the form of parallel adjectival patterns does not prevent a case of semantic conflict between the two. In the phrase in question, an arrow takes life while at the same time making home, that is marking out the home frontiers. In the original, the second of the two modifying items ‘ساز/سوز’ (süz/säz: burn/make) form a minimal pair with a para-rhyming pattern, wherein ‘the last stressed vowels differ, but the following sounds are identical (Cuddon, 2013: 608).’ To bring such a formal alignment into being, a parallel construction was used in the target text by using the TL minimal pairs take/make in -ing form to provide for a rhyming pattern: life-taking and home-making, while at the same time taking care of transferring the semantic content as closely as possible.

In fine, suffice it to say that though the translational points worthy of explanation in this work far exceed the few examples included above, yet, due to space limitation, let’s bring this commentary to a close here and read the poem as it has appeared in translation.

Bibliography

Behzad, Faramarz (2012). Deutsch-Persisches Wörterbuch (German-Persian Dictionary). Kharazmi Publishing, Tehran.

Berman, Antoine (1985/2012). Translation and the Trials of the Foreign. In: The Translation Studies Reader, Lawrence Venuti (Ed.), Third Edition, New York: Routledge, pp. 240-253.

Boyce, Mary (1992). Zoroastrianism, Costa Mesa, New York, California, USA.

Cuddon, John Anthony B. (2013). A Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory. Fifth edition, Revised by M. A. R. Habib, Wiley and Blackwell: A John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Publication.

DehKhoda, Ali Akbar (1998). DehKhoda Encyclopedic Dictionary of Persian Language, Vol. 5, New Edition, 15 Volumes, Tehran: Tehran University Press: DehKhoda Encyclopedic Dictionary Institute in Cooperation with Rouzaneh.

Kasra’i, Siavash (2005). Āraŝ-e Kamāngīr/Arash-e Kamangir, Ketab-e Nader Publishing. Tehran, Iran.

Larson, Mildred L. (1998). Meaning-Based Translation: A Guide to Cross-Language Equivalence. (2nd Edition). University Press of America, Lanham, Maryland.

Nabokov, Vladimir (1955). Problems of Translation: Onegin in English. In L.Venuti, (Ed.), (2012). The Translation Studies Reader, Third Edition, New York: Routledge, 113-125.

Steiner George (1975). After Babel: Aspects of Language and Translation. London, Oxford, and New York: Oxford University Press.

Steiner, George (1975/2012). The Hermeneutic Motion. In: L. Venuti (Ed.) (2012), The Translation Studies Reader. Third Edition, New York: Routledge, 156-161.

The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (1973). Revised and edited by C. T. Onions. Third Edition, Vol. I. Clarendon Press. Oxford.

Yazdanparast, Hamid (2006). Name-ye Iran (Book of Iran): A Series of Articles, Poems, and Texts on Iranian Studies, comp. & abr, Volume two, Ettela’at Publications, Tehran, Iran.

Digital Sources

Abedi, Kamyar (2009). KASRA’I, Siavash. Encyclopaedia Iranica, Online Edition, April 20, 2009, http://www.iranica.com/articles/kasrai- siavash- marxist- poet.

Loghat-nameye Deh-Khoda (Encyclopedic Dictionary of the Persian Language) Kingroid Digital Version 1.0.0.

Oxford Collocations Dictionary CD-ROM (2009). First Edition, © Oxford University Press 2008 and its licensors. Database right Oxford University Press (maker).

Persian Mirror (2004). ©2004 PersianMirror, Inc., http://www.persianmirror.com.

Tafazzol, A. and Hanaway, Jr., W. L. (1986). ARAS. Encyclopaedia Iranica, Online Edition, December 15, http://www.iranica.com/articles/aras-avestan-erexsa.

[*] The title given to this commentary was inspired by a statement made by my late father, Ali Mehrpooya, upon my first reciting of the poem Arash the Archer in Persian: “If it was not for the walnut tree, the arrow had still a long way to fly!” he said.


©inTRAlinea & Abbas Mehrpooya (2018).
"Arash the Archer". Translation from the work of Siavash Kasra'i.
This translation can be freely reproduced under Creative Commons License.
Stable URL: http://www.intralinea.org/translations/item/2324

Go to top of page